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Old 03-05-2012, 08:02 PM   #31
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Those folks that like lychee, do you also like longans (logans)?
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Old 03-05-2012, 08:04 PM   #32
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A friend of mine lived in Jamaica for several years while he was growing up. He told us about a Jamaican fruit, I believe it was ackee, but I might be mistaken. In any case, when this fruit ripens and opens up, it gives off a toxic gas and it is extremely dangerous to be walking through one of the orchards when this happens.
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Old 03-05-2012, 11:39 PM   #33
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Ackee is toxic before ripening... you have to let it do its thing.

It can also pose issues if it is overripe...

Gotta love that in a fruit...
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Old 03-06-2012, 03:21 AM   #34
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My favorite, and a childhood favorite, was salt cod(rinsed, soaked and water refreshed at least three times)poached, and then crumbled into cooked potatoes, then mixed with butter, a little sour cream(or creme fraiche), salt and pepper, the whole mix was then put into individual cassoles, and broiled off until a little crusty on the top.

Mom would serve with toast points, and pickled onions.

SO DAMNED GOOD!!!!
my mom made something similar. wow was it good. reconstituted white fish, potatoes, cream, pickled veggies, and onions baked into a casserole.

rib stickin' cold weather food.
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Old 03-06-2012, 09:27 AM   #35
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salt cod - soak 48 hrs in cold water

soak 48 hrs in cold water and repeat change of water several times by draining

in 48 hrs: drain water and using a tweezer pluck out bones

this stage - cod shall be ready to use

this is very common in spain, portugal and italia

uses:

vizcaína - red bell roasted, tomato, shallot, leek and olive oil
pil pil - parsley and garlic and saute in olive oil
omelette
salsa verde, parsley and white wine with either a small potato to thicken or a drop of flour

Sorry have alot of computer trouble today getting line out as I am out of Madrid

Margi.
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:49 AM   #36
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If we buy salted cod in the bag, there are bones. But in the wooden box that is out of Canada there are no bones. At least I have never found one. I always get the wooden box. Boy though it is expensive. And the bag with the bones is not much cheaper. I am going to check to see if the both of them are from the same company. I have the feeling that the bony one is the leftovers from the wooden box. After reconstituting the box fish, I can take good size fillets and bread them and then saute them as if I had bought it fresh from my fish monger. But not with the bag ingredients. It is only good for creamed dishes where pieces are the norm.
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Old 03-06-2012, 12:20 PM   #37
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And I should have weighed the soaked, hydrated product. It appears to take up considerable water in being brought back to the consistency of fresh cod. That could take a little sting out of the price, which was, if I recall, $7 for the 16-ounce box. Previously frozen cod fillets in the same store generally run $6 to $7 per pound.

I have another box this week. I'll try to remember to weight it. It is said to increase in weight by one-third. That would make it about 21 hydrated ounces for $7, or 30-cents per ounce, which is $4.80 per pound hydrated, which isn't bad for fish.
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Old 03-06-2012, 12:41 PM   #38
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And I should have weighed the soaked, hydrated product. It appears to take up considerable water in being brought back to the consistency of fresh cod. That could take a little sting out of the price, which was, if I recall, $7 for the 16-ounce box. Previously frozen cod fillets in the same store generally run $6 to $7 per pound.

I have another box this week. I'll try to remember to weight it. It is said to increase in weight by one-third. That would make it about 21 hydrated ounces for $7, or 30-cents per ounce, which is $4.80 per pound hydrated, which isn't bad for fish.
Thanks for the math. My worst subject all through school. I have the feeling you will going to the store way before me. Take a look and see if the bag is from the same company. That is mostly scrap pieces. I never buy it because it usually has bones in it. $4.80 is an excellent price.
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Old 03-06-2012, 03:13 PM   #39
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My store doesn't have the bag. But I wouldn't be surprised if you're right. It's probably not worth the packer picking the bones out of the trimmings, and the trimmings may not justify the neat little wooden box. (Is there any real reason for that box, anyway? Or is it just to convey the idea that it keeps so long that they give you a box to keep it in? Or is it just a throwback to the practice of shipping larger lots of salt cod in boxes?)
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Old 03-06-2012, 04:58 PM   #40
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My store doesn't have the bag. But I wouldn't be surprised if you're right. It's probably not worth the packer picking the bones out of the trimmings, and the trimmings may not justify the neat little wooden box. (Is there any real reason for that box, anyway? Or is it just to convey the idea that it keeps so long that they give you a box to keep it in? Or is it just a throwback to the practice of shipping larger lots of salt cod in boxes?)
I would say it is the latter. It used to be stored on ships in large wooden barrels.
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recipe, salt

Salt Cod I have managed, for all these years, to have never used salt cod. But thinking about how much of a staple it is in the Caribbean where people are surrounded by excellent fresh fish, I figured there must be something more to it than preserved fish that people got a taste for during slave days. So, last night, I made cod cakes. They were quite good, very mild. While soaking the fish for a day and a half though many changes of water, I was struck that there was no fishiness at all after it was cured. I'll try another dish this week, if anyone has a suggestion. 3 stars 1 reviews
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