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Old 06-24-2016, 01:07 PM   #31
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Addie, most 7-11 products like candy, chips, bread, and sandwiches are brought in by independent contractors. They were assigned whatever shelf space we had available. Our manager did her best to keep those guys happy. They were responsible for taking the outdated items off the shelf and replacing them, although if we saw something outdated, we could take it off, put it behind the counter and give it to the vendor when he showed up. We took pride that our store was clean, safe for the customers, and didn't sell out of date food.

The beer and soda were also brought in by independent contractors, and you should have heard them fight about their spaces. Beer Co. A wanted to put a new beer out, so he'd pull some of Beer Co. B's beer off and replace it with his own new stuff. Honestly, sometimes it was like being in charge of first graders. "Teacher, he took my shelf!"
Someone from your former store needs to go to the store up the street. For a month now they haven't been able to accept EBT cards. Me thinks, and so do lots of their customers, that they were allowing illegal purchases charged to the cards and got caught. A large fine and loss of income and customers. This store is just badly run.
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Old 06-24-2016, 06:56 PM   #32
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It starts with the manager and trickles down to the employees. I was lucky - I had a great manager and some awesome coworkers. The other 7-11 in town also had a great owner and coworkers - I used to wait on that manager when I worked in the bank. Our whole town was sort of like that - we looked out for one another and we knew all the cops personally and I loved my regulars. People are amazed if I tell them I worked grave in a 7-11 for three years, and yes, I have lots of stories, but in that town and in that time, I could get away with it and not worry about too much trouble.
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Old 06-25-2016, 12:58 PM   #33
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I like the sardine pizza recipe. I am all ears for good canned-sardine recipes, because they're about the greenest protein you can buy, and they happen to taste terrific. They are the lie to the idea that poor people can't eat very well indeed.

I highly recommend Pasta con le Sarde which is a knickerdropping combination of sardines with fennel. I first discovered the flavour combination in a big yellow can labelled only in Portuguese, and it haunted me for years until I found out what it was.

(There's even a good vegan variation titled - best as I can manage - Pasta con le Sarde a la Mer: Pasta with Sardines in the Sea.)

There is a respected pizza-style called Finocchio Flower Power where "finocchio" is Italian for fennel. The recipe uses fennel sausage and thin slices of fresh fennel. Next time I have my wood-burning oven cranked, I'll make one with that sardine pizza sauce, slivers of fennel, and skip the sausage.
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Old 06-25-2016, 01:49 PM   #34
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I like the sardine pizza recipe. I am all ears for good canned-sardine recipes, because they're about the greenest protein you can buy, and they happen to taste terrific. They are the lie to the idea that poor people can't eat very well indeed.

I highly recommend Pasta con le Sarde which is a knickerdropping combination of sardines with fennel. I first discovered the flavour combination in a big yellow can labelled only in Portuguese, and it haunted me for years until I found out what it was.

(There's even a good vegan variation titled - best as I can manage - Pasta con le Sarde a la Mer: Pasta with Sardines in the Sea.)

There is a respected pizza-style called Finocchio Flower Power where "finocchio" is Italian for fennel. The recipe uses fennel sausage and thin slices of fresh fennel. Next time I have my wood-burning oven cranked, I'll make one with that sardine pizza sauce, slivers of fennel, and skip the sausage.
Thanks for getting this totally derailed thread back on the sardine track, with a very interesting post.
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Old 06-26-2016, 07:12 PM   #35
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I myself haven't used fennel in a long time in a recipe, I think I'm in a rut.
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Old 06-26-2016, 08:03 PM   #36
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Instead if giving Spike a list of what I would like from the produce department, I really need to take the time to go to that side of the store and browse the produce department. I haven't used leeks in ages. And I like them, even if they are a lot of work sometimes.
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Old 06-28-2016, 12:49 AM   #37
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I like the sardine pizza recipe.
I like the Portuguese ideas you have posted myself, the sardine pizza is mine, and well, you have to like sardines, one thing about that recipe, is it is scalable. You can easily add or detract from it.

I've done that exact recipe up in Williamsburg Brooklyn on New Years day 2001, with Kale mixed with fresh spinich, very nice artisan riccota cheese, and anchovies (which I still think are sardines, but fancy like) for author hipster friends, heirloom tomatoes, and chillies, and all loved it.

Same thing a month later in Oklahoma, replace the riccota with cottege cheese, the spinach was frozen, the sardines from a can, and a can of Ro-Tell tomatoes.

Same damn pizza. My Okie friends at least had yeast already for the crust.

I'll stand by that recipe whether you make it with good or awful ingredients. Salty fish belongs on pizza, some will vehemently argue against this. They are wrong.
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Old 06-28-2016, 10:19 AM   #38
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It's hard to find fresh sardines, and you have to have tolerance for bones, but I sometimes find them here in Seattle for $2/lb, simply silly pricing. I totally concur with your salty fish theorem. It's not well-known that sardines are just "small, oily fish," not a species. It's rare to find the larger types, like pilchards, in the US.

I used to do fisheries research on the Hudson River, and (little-known fact) anchovies are native to the tidal (lower 100 miles) section of the river. Most species of fish we hauled up survived just fine, even after measuring and tagging, but anchovies inevitably died. I likely killed a million of them, sadly. Some of the crew used them for garden mulch; I cooked with them (very mild and delicate when fresh) and made disastrous attempts at salt-curing.

Erehweslefox's pizza ideas are great, but what are people doing, buying ricotta? It only takes 15 minutes to get a gallon of whole milk to the hung-up-dripping-in-panty-hose stage of ricotta-making. Better than anything you can buy.

If you ever find white anchovies, pay whatever it takes (a lot!) to get them. They're a different world. Eat them right out of the jar. Bet you can't have just one.
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Old 06-28-2016, 11:52 AM   #39
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Stargazy Pie

Stargazy Pie




This surely is the most IN U FACE sardine recipe imaginable. The combination of oily fish and hard-boiled eggs is interesting. Fresh fish are mandatory, obviously, and you have to be a hardcore fish-eater, because they're going to be staring at you as you eat them. It's a centuries-old Cornish recipe, and a complete giggle to serve. Any oily fish like small mackerel or bluefish also work fine.

There's a reason for the pie geometry: the heads get roasted and their flavoursome juices and oils drain down into the pie (I DID mention "hardcore fish-eater" :-)

Here's the Saveur recipe, which is fine. Coleman's mustard (Keen's if you're in Canada) is mandatory. Crème fraîche is overkill, given all the flavours; plain yogurt or sour cream work fine. As you can imagine, getting the crust on while poking the heads through is an utter pain, so maybe get some help.
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Old 06-28-2016, 07:09 PM   #40
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Stargazy Pie




This surely is the most IN U FACE sardine recipe imaginable. The combination of oily fish and hard-boiled eggs is interesting. Fresh fish are mandatory, obviously, and you have to be a hardcore fish-eater, because they're going to be staring at you as you eat them. It's a centuries-old Cornish recipe, and a complete giggle to serve. Any oily fish like small mackerel or bluefish also work fine.

There's a reason for the pie geometry: the heads get roasted and their flavoursome juices and oils drain down into the pie (I DID mention "hardcore fish-eater" :-)

Here's the Saveur recipe, which is fine. Coleman's mustard (Keen's if you're in Canada) is mandatory. Crème fraîche is overkill, given all the flavours; plain yogurt or sour cream work fine. As you can imagine, getting the crust on while poking the heads through is an utter pain, so maybe get some help.
Oh, I MUST make this, it would freak my wife the Heck OUT! I've already been threatening her with Eel pie from my medieval cookbook.... I am just picturing the expression on her face here. I am Cornish and Welsh, why have I not heard of this?

TBS
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