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Old 07-14-2016, 11:16 AM   #11
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I usually bake mine straight away in a baking dish, usually without crumbs but with a bit of butter and maybe on a bed of sliced leeks or something.

Or in parchment.

IMO mild white fish benefits from aggressive seasoning. Same with salmon.
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Old 07-14-2016, 11:25 AM   #12
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Here's a simple, yet elegant dish, courtesy of the chef from Scoma's in San Francisco:

SNAPPER ROMANO

Ingredients:

Fish
· 4 Pacific rock cod, or other firm fleshed fish fillets
· 1 cup all-purpose flour
· 2 Tbs olive oil
· salt and pepper to taste

Sauce
· 1 tsp garlic, finely chopped
· ½ tsp lemon juice
· 2 Tbs butter, cubed and slightly chilled
· 2 Tbs Mushroom, sliced
· 2 Tbs yellow onion, sliced
· 1 scallion, white part only, sliced
· ¼ tsp oregano
· 2 cups marinara sauce
· 1 cup bay shrimp
· salt and pepper to taste
Instructions:

In a sauté pan or skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Dry fish fillets with paper towels, season with salt and pepper, dredge in flour, and sauté until cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Remove fish and keep warm.

Reduce heat to medium, add garlic to the sauté pan and cook, stirring constantly, until it just starts to get golden brown, about 30 seconds. Remove from heat, add lemon juice and butter and swirl the pan until butter just melts. Add mushroom, onion, scallion, and oregano and sauté until soft. Add the marinara and shrimp and bring to a boil. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper to taste. Pour sauce over fish fillets.
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Old 07-14-2016, 11:34 AM   #13
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Drain fillets well on paper towels if previously frozen. They will contain quite a bit of liquid.

In a small bowl add about a 1/2 cup ketchup, one or two garlic cloves (use a garlic press) a pinch of pepper flakes or a few drops of hot sauce and 1/2 squeezed lime juice. Salt and pepper.

Butter low sided broiler safe pan.
Stir ketchup mixture up very well and put on top of fish.
Put dots of butter on top of ketchup covering and push the butter pats down into the ketchup. So the butter will pool instead of running off the sides.
Broil ketchup side up until ketchup is marked and fish is done.
Do not turn fish. Broil ketchup side up until done and slightly charred.

Serve with anything you like.
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Old 07-14-2016, 11:41 AM   #14
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wow thanks, lots of tips to soak in and try!!!
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Old 07-14-2016, 12:35 PM   #15
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I recently made roasted fish coated with Dijon mustard and thyme. It was delicious. Personally, though, I don't like to turn the oven up to 400 in the summer, which is why I suggested pan-frying. YMMV, of course.
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Old 07-14-2016, 02:06 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I usually bake mine straight away in a baking dish, usually without crumbs but with a bit of butter and maybe on a bed of sliced leeks or something.

Or in parchment.

IMO mild white fish benefits from aggressive seasoning. Same with salmon.
I'm just the opposite. Unless the dish demands it, I prefer a mild flavored fish to be lightly seasoned, salt and pepper and/or a light seasoning blend like Savory's Barrier Reef Seasoning.. Heavy flavors just mask the fish, which in my opinion should be the star of the dish. I can change that somewhat depending on the flavor profile of the overall meal.
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Old 07-14-2016, 02:52 PM   #17
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I fry my walleye fillets (when I can get them) in butter in a pan on the stovetop. Or campfire.
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Old 07-14-2016, 05:48 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I'm just the opposite. Unless the dish demands it, I prefer a mild flavored fish to be lightly seasoned, salt and pepper and/or a light seasoning blend like Savory's Barrier Reef Seasoning.. Heavy flavors just mask the fish, which in my opinion should be the star of the dish. I can change that somewhat depending on the flavor profile of the overall meal.

By seasoning I mean salt, although the cod and haddock I usually eat can be pretty bland and boring flavor wise

But for salmon I like using rubs or marinades.
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Old 07-14-2016, 06:33 PM   #19
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I love cod, it's very versatile fish and is good any way you make it. I love a simple approach Red Lobster takes in preparation of it's baked cod. Baked in a little bit of butter it is yumy.
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Old 07-15-2016, 06:01 AM   #20
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I've never tried this but I'd bet you could steam fish in a bamboo steamer. Line the basket(s) with bok choy and throw in some dim sum that would go with the fish. Anyone ever done this?
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