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Old 12-14-2018, 08:16 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by JustJoel View Post
I do believe he was talking about lobsters, not fowl, TL. Female lobsters are called hens, and I would imagine, from the text, that either young lobsters or small female lobsters are called chicks.

Please correct me if Im wrong
That would explain it. I had never heard of female lobsters being called hens. I kind of expect some kind of bird for the word hen. I wouldn't have been thrown off as much if there hadn't been mention of chicken in the post that was quoted.
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Old 12-14-2018, 09:58 PM   #52
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Wow! And again WOW!!! I would have a heart attack looking at those prices. Our scallop fleet is out of New Bedford in SE Mass. Emeril Lagasse home town. One of the delicacies they serve down there is Conch Salad. Stinks to high heaven. Conch is a huge crab type animal in the really large shells you find on the seashore. My second husband used to bring home those shells with the live animal in it. I kept a bucket of bleach outside and he would put the shell in it before I would allow it in the house. The Pirate would take the shell down to the Curio Shop and sell the shell for money for the movies.
As previously mentioned, conch is closely related to snails, and it certainly shouldn't stink. I became VERY familiar with conch salad during the 2 years I lived in the Bahamas. I ate it almost weekly, and I miss it here in the Land of no Conch. Our best friends on the Island own Max's Conch Bar. Gary started with a piece of plywood across 2 barrels on the side of the highway (he had been making salad informally for years for the crew when he worked as a fisherman). His original conch salad bar was such a hit that he made it his full time business.

The current restaurant is still in the same place, just on the opposite side of the Queen's Highway from his original stand. You can get conch salad, conch fritters, crack conch, along with various other fish and seafood preparations. Also chicken, and several pork and wild boar dishes, and curry mutton (goat) is often on the menu. Some of Liz's specialties like pumpkin funny and stuffed breadfruit were also on the menu often.

A link to Trip Advisor's entry on the Conch Bar: Max's Conch Bar (The woman sitting at the bar is also a friend from Little Rock Arkansas. We spent a bit of time with them last month when just happened to be visiting the Island at the same time, and staying at the same villas.)
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Old 12-15-2018, 05:24 AM   #53
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The most I have ever seen for lobster is $7.99...
But I was talking about the prices for scallops. Even at $12.99, a pound of scallops at that price are a better value than a $7.99 lobster. A one-pound lobster rarely yields even a half pound, so you're paying at least $15.98 for edible lobster. And with scallops, you don't have to work for the meat!
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Old 12-15-2018, 05:46 AM   #54
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No. The sign said "Dry Scallops". I know the difference between them. I never buy wet ones. I refuse to pay for water. I never asked my mother what my first solid food was. But I wouldn't be surprised if it was seafood. During WWII, if there were small kids in the family, you would always find them at the beach in the summer, digging clams for meatless days. And after a Nor'easter, it was lobsters also. That's probably why I ended up marrying a professional fisherman. Seafood is as much a part of my makeup as breathing.
As GG mentioned, wet scallops are chemically treated to retain water. The place we get the dry packed from also carry live diver scallops.

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Every time I hear about conch I'm reminded of a lady I worked with back in the 1970s. She was from Jamaica and told me that conch was considered poor people's food back in Jamaica. People would sneak out to the beach to get conch at night, when they thought the neighbours wouldn't see them. They wanted to avoid the social stigma.
Back in the late 80's I was sent to Kingston to work on a lobster and conch companies high pressure compressors (5000 psi). One had to be rebuilt. They set me up under a lean-to, next to where they cooked the lobster catch for the Japanese market. I was totally appalled when they started cooking the lobsters as they took everything, including shorts and egg bearing females. At that time they were already working 40 miles off their coast because they had wiped out everything commercially viable in between.

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GG, maybe it was conch, but not Queen conch.
It was Queen conch, most likely from the Bahamas. The Bahamians, unlike the Jamaicans, got smart and realized that their fisheries resources were not an unlimited supply. Other conch species, like horse conch, do not exist in quantities to support a commercially viable harvest. There is a tourist trap in Cape Coral, FL called the "Shell Factory". The Queen conch shells they offer come from the Caribbean.
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Old 12-15-2018, 09:16 AM   #55
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But I was talking about the prices for scallops. Even at $12.99, a pound of scallops at that price are a better value than a $7.99 lobster. A one-pound lobster rarely yields even a half pound, so you're paying at least $15.98 for edible lobster. And with scallops, you don't have to work for the meat!
The cheapest I have ever seen scallops for recently was $9.99 and they were in the shell. I prefer my mollusk seafood in the shell. I also buy any clams in the shell.

The cost of lobster is well worth it to me. My ultimate shell fish.
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Old 12-15-2018, 10:32 AM   #56
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Lobsters generally run about $12 per pound here, more in the winter. They drop to around $6 a pound in early summer when they are soft shelled.

And I'm with you, Addie. Lobster is my ultimate seafood as well. I could eat it every week.
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Old 12-15-2018, 12:40 PM   #57
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Lobsters generally run about $12 per pound here, more in the winter. They drop to around $6 a pound in early summer when they are soft shelled.

And I'm with you, Addie. Lobster is my ultimate seafood as well. I could eat it every week.
I found quite by accident, that during the summer months, if I buy a lobster alive instead of steamed and then let it sit for a day or two in the fridge, the shell tends to be a bit harder than when I bought it. Lobsters just love the cold. The colder the better. When I do that, I also will put it in the freezer about an hour prior to plunging it in boiling water. They have less kick before plunging it, when you do that.

Only every week? Lobster roll every other day, lobster pie for Sunday, and lobster dipped in melted butter for other days. Or even a lobster salad on special occasions.

I have also had the privilege of having scallops right out of the shell, (I hate shucking them along with quahogs) of course clams galore, clam chowder made with fresh clams, quahogs, stuffed and chopped for chowder, etc.

I just love living where I do. Right on the coast of the Atlantic.
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