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Old 09-29-2006, 04:26 PM   #11
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I am not into making or stuffing lobster but I enjoy going out for a wonderfull lobster dinner.
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Old 09-29-2006, 05:06 PM   #12
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Well steaming for two minutes and then shocking did exactly as I predicted. The tail curls up parallel to the body, and then when you split it/cook it the tail stays flat.

Still unsure about a good temp. I think 145 may be a bit overdone for lobster. I'm going to try the quick steam followed by roasting at 300 until the Lobster reaches 130F. I'll have to pick up a few more bugs tomorrow.
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Old 09-29-2006, 07:04 PM   #13
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Here's a recipe from Joe's Crab Shack:

http://www.cajuncookingrecipes.com/r...p?recipeid=668

And here is a page that has several recipes from the Food Network:

http://web.foodnetwork.com/food/web/...rchType=Recipe
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Old 10-01-2006, 11:10 AM   #14
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Thanks guys!

I've started down another path here. Instead of leaving the tailpiece whole and submitting it to high temps in the oven, I removed all the meat in the lobster, broke it into chunky pieces, and incorporated it into one master stuffing that fills the entire shell. I am getting excellent results now, as the lobster is lightly steamed within the buttery stuffing maintaining it's fabulous flavor and texture similar to butter poaching (but still not quite as good).

Have to pick up a few more bugs today again to try some combinations, then I'll post tonight with what I came up with.

Off to the grocery store...
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Old 10-01-2006, 09:41 PM   #15
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Ok... I don't feel that it's 100% yet - but it's about 95% of what I imagine it to be . I still feel there is something small thats missing... haven't put a finger on it yet. Maybe it's just that I feel that butter poaching is the ultimate lobster preparation.

It's a modified version that Emeril uses.

1 1-1/2lb Lobster
1-T Butter
1-T Butter (Melted)
1-T Minced Shallot
1-T Minced Celery
1-T Minced Red Bell Pepper
1-T Minced Green Bell Pepper
1 Clove Garlic - Minced
1-t Minced Parsley
2-T Dry White Wine
1-t Fresh Lemon Juice
1/2-t Seafood Spice (e.g. Old Bay or Creole Essence)
3/4-C Crushed Garlic Croutons (Homemade is Best)
Kosher Salt & Freshly Ground White Pepper

Preheat the oven to 375F. Steam the lobster for two minutes, then plunge it into an ice bath to stop the cooking. Trim the legs, claws/knuckles, and split the lobster in half lengthwise. Thoroughly wash out the innards and digestive track. Remove all the meat from the tail, claws/knuckles, legs, and roughly chop it then set it aside. Remove the lung sections from each lobster half, being careful to leave the pieces of connective tissue that holds the cephalothorax to the tail shell. Dry the shells in the oven.

Heat a tablespoon of butter in a skillet over medium heat and sweat the shallot, celery, and peppers until they are soft and translucent. Add the garlic and parsley and cook for an additional minute or two. Remove the pan from the heat and incorporate the lobster. Stir in the wine, lemon juice, and seafood seasoning. Fold in the crushed croutons and melted butter. Season with kosher salt and white pepper.

Stuff the lobster shell halves and bake for 15-20min (15-16min seems to work best for me, but the retained heat in my skillet might be greater than someone with thinner pans which partially cooks the lobster while bringing the stuffing together).

Serve with a lemon wedge for squeezing. With a side salad and soup or dessert this will easily feed two people.

A quick lobster infused cream sauce might be perfect to drizzle over the plate... maybe thats what it could use. I'll have to try that out tomorrow. Oh, subbing lobster butter for the tablespoon that is folded into the stuffing might be killer too.
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Old 10-01-2006, 09:54 PM   #16
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Oh, and here is the blend of spices I used as a "Seafood Spice"...

2-T Paprika
2-T Kosher Salt
2-T Garlic Powder
1-T Freshly Ground Black Pepper
1-T Onion Powder
1-t Cayenne Pepper
1-t Dried Oregano
1-t Dried Thyme
1/2-t Celery Seed

It's kind of like Emeril's Creole spice mix with the addition of celery seed and different ratios of the other spices.
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Old 10-01-2006, 10:00 PM   #17
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Again, for homemade garlic crouton crumbs/pieces...

Old Bread
Butter
Garlic

Preheat the oven to 375F. Melt a stick of butter over medium-low heat. Add four large cloves of garlic that have been crushed with the broadside of a chef's knife. Simmer until the garlic turns a golden brown the remove from the heat.

Cut the bread into 3/4" thick slices and brush on both sides with garlic butter. Bake until the croutons are thoroughly crisp with no moisture left at their centers. Cool on wire racks, then crush in a ziplock bag with a rolling pin (or wine bottle like I use).
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Old 10-02-2006, 01:21 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher
I steam them for just a few minutes so the meat comes away from the exoskeleton cleanly (it's still raw), and then I poach the pieces as Keller does.
Just curious, do you find a difference between steaming and simmering in your first step? I am trying to think back, but I am almost positive that I read a whole essay on this in Rob Wolke's "What Einstein Told His Cook" - good book, if I remember correctly I think his conclusion was the results were similar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher
Oh, I just had some great fun a few minutes ago after wiping down my board and knocking a full cup of minced green bell pepper onto the floor...
Did that once, except it wasnt a cup of chopped peppers, but rather a big bowl of grilled and smoky pureed fresh tomatoes - after having sweated 15 minutes in front of the grill, not fun!


In your latest recipe, you chopped tail, claw and leg meat into the stuffing, did you notice any difference in the cooking time for the claw meat vs tail meat (since when you were doing them separate you were introducing the claws into the oven earlier) now that they were all chopped up together?

Thanks for sharing your experiments!!
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Old 10-02-2006, 08:20 AM   #19
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The claws took longer to cook because they were compact with less surface area than the long strip of tailmeat with direct exposure to the radiant heat of the oven walls. Removing all the meat after a quick 2min steam allows you to chop it into roughly equal size pieces which yields an even cooktime for all the meat. Within the stuffing it's also cooking by a gentle moist heat rather than a violent exposure to the 375F oven temp. This gave the meat a tender texture throughout rather than a seized up slightly-chewy exterior.

I still don't have that recipe 100%. I can tell I really nailed something when I crave it the next day. The above recipe was definetly good, but not yearning for another bite good. I bought one more lobster this morning to try a couple small changes. That makes twelve bugs this week, and I've pretty much drained the money I set aside for this project. I'll move on after today to try some other recipes while I ponder this one some more. Picked up some sirloin and tenderloin tips to play around with Stroganoff recipes tomorrow.

As far as steaming vs boiling, I almost always opt for the former (an exception might be a quick blanch/shock to bring out the color in green veggies, or to cook certain roots like potatoes of carrots). I can get a steamer going much quicker than a giant pot of water, and according to some, you retain more nutrients by not releasing them into the water. I've tried steaming vs boiling with a few vegetables, and I find the results similar. The catch is, you need a lot of water to dampen the effects of the room temp veggies sucking heat out of the water. If you don't, the process slows and you can develop a mushiness or discoloration by the time the vegetables are finished. Steaming recovers very quickly over high heat once you put the lid back on. BUT, unless you use multiple trays, you are severely limited by the amount of steaming you can do at once. You don't want things piled on top of one another or they won't cook evenly. For commerical applications or large 10+ people meals I would probably revert to an 8qt pot with 6qt of boiling salted water. One of my favorite weekday meals is a piece of meat pounded out and sauteed served with some roasted roots, steamed green beans, and a savory pan sauce. The beans are always the last thing prepared as they take just a few minutes. I often put them in just as the pan sauce is coming together.

Anyhoo, off to do some cooking.
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Old 10-02-2006, 09:14 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven S
I am trying to think back, but I am almost positive that I read a whole essay on this in Rob Wolke's "What Einstein Told His Cook" - good book, if I remember correctly I think his conclusion was the results were similar.


I seem to remember that part of the book as well.

I also so a show once where a number of chefs in Maine were asked if there was a diffeence in taste between boiling or steaming. Every single chef agreed that there was no taste difference at all, but at the same time each had a preference of one over the other.

I personally like steaming better for the sole reason that it is less messy. When you crack open a boiled lobster you get a ton of water that pours out. You get a lot less of that with a steamed lobster.
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