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Old 05-04-2011, 02:54 PM   #11
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After reading this tread I had to do some myself. This is how I do it.
For the Spice mix I used Paul Prudhommes recipie

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Old 05-05-2011, 12:55 PM   #12
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Blackened Fish was VERY trendy about 30 years ago. Chefs and home cooks tried it on just about every fish imaginable.

some interesting caveats....

1. It's not likely that your home stove will get hot enough to really "blacken" the fish. If it does, your kitchen may end up on fire. Restaurant chefs generally caution home cooks on this sad fact. You can season your fish with the spices, but real "blackening" needs to be done in a restaurant kitchen for safety's sake.

2. If you love the taste of the fish, be warned that the blackening spices are likely to take over the flavor.
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Old 05-05-2011, 01:35 PM   #13
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Blackened Fish was VERY trendy about 30 years ago. Chefs and home cooks tried it on just about every fish imaginable.

some interesting caveats....

1. It's not likely that your home stove will get hot enough to really "blacken" the fish. If it does, your kitchen may end up on fire. Restaurant chefs generally caution home cooks on this sad fact. You can season your fish with the spices, but real "blackening" needs to be done in a restaurant kitchen for safety's sake.

2. If you love the taste of the fish, be warned that the blackening spices are likely to take over the flavor.
Yup, "blackened" technique needs to be done outside for the home cook. CI is the proper way to go and it needs to be white hot. I've never lost the taste of the grouper due to the thickness of the cut I use and the speed at which it cooks in that white hot pan.

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Old 05-05-2011, 02:35 PM   #14
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I'm not a fan of anything blackened - too much pepper. Char-crispy, yes. Blackened with spices, no.
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Old 05-05-2011, 07:01 PM   #15
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Yup, "blackened" technique needs to be done outside for the home cook. CI is the proper way to go and it needs to be white hot. I've never lost the taste of the grouper due to the thickness of the cut I use and the speed at which it cooks in that white hot pan.

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I dunno, at work we cook our blackened chicken on the grill and I think it comes out mighty tasty! Well they start it on the grill to blacken the spices, then finish it in the oven. Probably more for lack of space on the grill than anything else. I never thought I'd say this, but I think this is one dish I'd like better on a gas grill than charcoal. With all the other flavors going on, I fear the added smoke might put it over the edge.
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Old 05-05-2011, 07:54 PM   #16
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I dunno, at work we cook our blackened chicken on the grill and I think it comes out mighty tasty! Well they start it on the grill to blacken the spices, then finish it in the oven. Probably more for lack of space on the grill than anything else. I never thought I'd say this, but I think this is one dish I'd like better on a gas grill than charcoal. With all the other flavors going on, I fear the added smoke might put it over the edge.
Then the technique is not being applied as originally intended. You're just grilling using the blackening spices, IMO. The pure form is done in a screaming hot, CI pan. Grilling just can't sear the spices properly and render the best results.

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Old 05-05-2011, 10:48 PM   #17
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I haven't made it in awhile, but any white fish fillets topped with chunky blue cheese dressing and chopped green onions and some crushed bread crumbs, then baked, is simple and surprisingly tasty.
White fish is becoming increasingly expensive, especially cod. Overfishing and environmental changes probably. Cod which was so abundant and economical is like buying shrimp or lobster now.
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Old 05-06-2011, 11:48 AM   #18
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I haven't made it in awhile, but any white fish fillets topped with chunky blue cheese dressing and chopped green onions and some crushed bread crumbs, then baked, is simple and surprisingly tasty.
White fish is becoming increasingly expensive, especially cod. Overfishing and environmental changes probably. Cod which was so abundant and economical is like buying shrimp or lobster now.
Shrimp is delicious done in a similar manner. Remember to peel them first!
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Old 05-06-2011, 03:45 PM   #19
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I am not big on blackening salmon as per OP, but I admit I have never done it either. Blackening a fish to me is much better suited for a white fish which often needs help in the zinger (flavor pumper) department.

As for Salmon... rather than look to your cupboard for spices, look to your fridge for dressings or condiments, such as dill pesto, rock mustard, creamy onion salad dressing, as for dry seasoning... Montreal Steak Spice.. goes great with fresh grilled salmon.
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Old 05-22-2011, 10:51 PM   #20
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I am not big on blackening salmon as per OP, but I admit I have never done it either. Blackening a fish to me is much better suited for a white fish which often needs help in the zinger (flavor pumper) department.

As for Salmon... rather than look to your cupboard for spices, look to your fridge for dressings or condiments, such as dill pesto, rock mustard, creamy onion salad dressing, as for dry seasoning... Montreal Steak Spice.. goes great with fresh grilled salmon.

I am curious as to how you would prepare a piece of Salmon with the Montreal Spice,,please elaborate if you would.
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The Simplest & Tastiest Fish Recipe It's so easy! [U][B]BLACKENED SALMON RECIPE[/B][/U] All you need is a slab of salmon (wiped with paper towel), garlic powder, onion powder and Carjun Spices and olive oil. Lay the salmon skin side down and cover the flesh facing up with Carjun spices, with a teaspoonful earch of garlic and onion powder. Film the pan with olive oil and wait for it to smoke, and carefully place the salmon skin side down onto the pan. Flip it once when the opacity reaches 2/3 the thickness of the salmon, so that the powdered side is facing downwards. High heat for 4 mins (depending on your stove) until the bottom is between dark golden brown and black. Serve, blackened side up. Bon Apetite! Great. Now I'm hungry again. I know this is a simplified version of blackened fish. Any ideas to make it even better? Carjun spices is the most fragrant mix of powdered spice I know. you guys happen to know any other good mixes? 3 stars 1 reviews
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