"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Fish & Seafood
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-02-2008, 01:07 PM   #21
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Attie, wet scallops have had a liquid injected into them. It makes them moist and adds weight so they get more money for less product.

Dry pack scallops do not have liquid injected so they are a higher quality scallop. They are more expensive then the wet ones because of this.

dmb88886, something you can try is broiling your scallops. That way the heat source is above the scallops so you are not trying to brown the side in the liquid if there is any.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2008, 05:40 PM   #22
Sous Chef
 
attie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Mackay Queensland Australia
Posts: 719
Thanks GB, Wikipedia tells us that they are treated with sodium tripolyphosphate to help preserve and gain weight so obviously we have only dry scallops here locally and 99% come with the roe on. To me the roe is the best part
__________________

__________________
http://cockeyed.com/inside/vegemite/vegemite.html
We are happy little Vegemites, happy as can be
attie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2008, 10:14 PM   #23
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Regardless of the pan heat, if you're getting a LOT of liquid out of your scallops, & they were reasonably priced, you most likely did not get "dry-pack" scallops. No amount of patting with paper towels are going to save them. Been there, done that. Plus, since the chemicals involved are basically a preservative & whitener (to make them look nicer in the display case), you really have no idea how long those scallops have been sitting there. This is yet another reason why dry-pack scallops cost more - there's no disguising their freshness.

I never buy anything other than dry-pack scallops anymore. Not only do I not like chemicals in my food (as much as I can avoid them), but I don't like the fact that I'm paying extra for them just so those scallops can look pristinely white & fresh & weigh more because of said chemicals. Yuck.

Next time, try to come across true dry-packs & try your recipe again. I'm sure you'll be pleasantly pleased & surprised at how nicely & quickly they sear up.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2008, 10:45 AM   #24
Head Chef
 
DramaQueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Posts: 1,347
Quote:
Originally Posted by attie View Post
Thanks GB, Wikipedia tells us that they are treated with sodium tripolyphosphate to help preserve and gain weight so obviously we have only dry scallops here locally and 99% come with the roe on. To me the roe is the best part
Scallop Roe?? I never heard of this before. I didn't know scallops had roe. I learned something today. Look at this: The red stuff is the roe.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Scallops with Roe On.jpg
Views:	128
Size:	98.6 KB
ID:	4828  
__________________
Visit my blogsite: Chew On This
DramaQueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2008, 03:44 PM   #25
Senior Cook
 
pugger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 248
Red face A little late

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmb88886 View Post
Hi, i'm new to this forum, first post.

I made scallops last night, and for the 2nd time this happened to me. I go to sear it (used a stainless steel pan) on a pretty high temperature and they started out searing nicely on the first side, and I flipped them over, and next thing you know all this juice comes out of the scallops and there is a ton of juice in the bottom of the pan and can no longer be seared. All I did was toss the scallops with olive oil, kosher salt and pepper. I also did pat them dry after rinsing them.

I remember last time I tried cooking scallops the same thing happeend.

Anybody have a clue as to why?
I don't know about the 'why' & apologize if already answered but I would use 2 pans, you've got good success on 1 side so an extra pan ready to go gets the other side, just a thought
__________________
pugger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2008, 04:16 PM   #26
Head Chef
 
DramaQueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Posts: 1,347
I think i mentioned this before in an earlier post. Instead of agonizing over it why not just drain the liquid as it accumulates? Pretty soon there is no more liquid and your scallops will brown beatifully. Just be sure not to overcook them.
__________________
Visit my blogsite: Chew On This
DramaQueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2008, 04:36 PM   #27
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
Melting a pat of butter at the end will sear them.
No, that won't sear anything. Searing takes place when the item first hit the pan, if it's going to happen at all. You need to have your product dry, and you need to have the pan hot enough that you hear a definits "sssssssssh" as you put each piece into the hot pan. The second side often doesn't sear, but doesn't really have to, as long as your top is beautifully browned.

If your unwrap your scallops and they are sitting in any kind of pool of liquid, they were treated, no matter what the market tells you about them being "dry" or "day-boat" or any such. Chemically treated scallops will always give off liquid in the pan, no matter how hard you try to dry them before cooking, and they will (at best) always have the faint but discernible taste of soapsuds.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2008, 04:37 PM   #28
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Originally Posted by attie View Post
Thanks GB, Wikipedia tells us that they are treated with sodium tripolyphosphate to help preserve and gain weight so obviously we have only dry scallops here locally and 99% come with the roe on. To me the roe is the best part
I quite agree, Wayne! If only we could get them in their shells with the roe! Sometimes restaurants can get those, but only "in season," and still, only sometimes.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2008, 06:11 PM   #29
Head Chef
 
DramaQueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Posts: 1,347
[quote=ChefJune;663572]No, that won't sear anything. Searing takes place when the item first hit the pan, if it's going to happen at all.

I respect your opinions ChefJune but I gotta argue the point about searing. I do this all the time and I get gorgeous, golden brown scallops. Wonder why it works for me and not for you.
__________________
Visit my blogsite: Chew On This
DramaQueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2008, 06:16 PM   #30
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,269
[quote=DramaQueen;663623]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
No, that won't sear anything. Searing takes place when the item first hit the pan, if it's going to happen at all.

I respect your opinions ChefJune but I gotta argue the point about searing. I do this all the time and I get gorgeous, golden brown scallops. Wonder why it works for me and not for you.

Chef June was disagreeing with the comment that adding butter at the end of cooking will sear the scallops.

She's right. The butter doesn't sear the scallops. The hot pan does.
You can sear scallops using butter, for sure, but it's not the butter that does the searing.
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.