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Old 01-06-2012, 10:53 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by htc View Post
I don't know what you would call this...political reasons maybe? The more I learn about slaughterhouse practices and other treatment of animals (i.e. lab testing, etc) the more I feel bad about eating meat.
You sound a little like me, though I'm not sure I would call my own reasons "political". Without going into too many of the gory details, let's just I just don't like some of the industrial agriculture practices used to produce meat for the masses. I don't think it's healthy for the animals or the people eating them.

I've never given up on meat, though I have cut down on it significantly and started buying it from what I consider to be better sources. Rather than get meat at the supermarket, I now buy it direct from the farm. And when I can't get that, I buy it at a co-op that sells locally raised meat from smaller farmers. If it's beef or lamb, I only buy 100% grass fed. Yes, it is more expensive, but I also feel it's more humanely raised and healthier. And because it's more expensive I don't eat as much of it.

Whereas my wife and I used to each down a 12 ounce steak in a single sitting, we now take an 8 ounce steak, cut it in half and eat 4 ounces each - all surrounded with lots of veggies. That, and a couple of eggs or some yogurt in the morning is all the animal based protein we eat in a single day.

Two days a week we eliminate the animal protein altogether and have a veggie protein day. Usually it's some sort of bean or tofu dish.

We've also upped our veggie intake overall.

Everyone has to do what they feel is right for themselves, but my suggestion is that if you like meat, eat it. Otherwise you'll always feel like you are missing something. But maybe just strive to make better choices, and replace some of that meat with fruits and vegetables.
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Old 01-07-2012, 07:14 AM   #22
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There used to be a doctor on a TV News program (don't remember which channel, his name was Rosen-something) who advocated "meatless Mondays". I think that for a lot of people, simply taking a period, be it a day of the week, or maybe going meatless except for celebrations, being meatless at home, but at restaurants or other peoples' homes, or as a friend recently wrote to me, she takes a period of time here or there, months usually, and goes vegan for that period, works. It "healthies-up" their diets, with out overwhelming their lifestyles and putting undue stress on the primary cook in their lives, their hosts, and when they do eat out.

A few years ago a daughter of a friend decided to "go vegan" without really knowing what it meant as a dedicated lifestyle. Because I'd done that interview a long time ago, I knew more about it than she. We'd had a potluck, and she asked if a dip I made was vegan and I started to say yes. Then clocked myself mentally, made a decision, and told her, no, it contains worcestershire sauce. She had no idea that was a no-no. (And when I explained, she didn't have the dip; I didn't know she was a vegan, or I'd have left it out).
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Old 05-12-2012, 01:52 PM   #23
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There used to be a doctor on a TV News program (don't remember which channel, his name was Rosen-something) who advocated "meatless Mondays". I think that for a lot of people, simply taking a period, be it a day of the week, or maybe going meatless except for celebrations, being meatless at home, but at restaurants or other peoples' homes, or as a friend recently wrote to me, she takes a period of time here or there, months usually, and goes vegan for that period, works. It "healthies-up" their diets, with out overwhelming their lifestyles and putting undue stress on the primary cook in their lives, their hosts, and when they do eat out.

A few years ago a daughter of a friend decided to "go vegan" without really knowing what it meant as a dedicated lifestyle. Because I'd done that interview a long time ago, I knew more about it than she. We'd had a potluck, and she asked if a dip I made was vegan and I started to say yes. Then clocked myself mentally, made a decision, and told her, no, it contains worcestershire sauce. She had no idea that was a no-no. (And when I explained, she didn't have the dip; I didn't know she was a vegan, or I'd have left it out).
It's very important that people know what it means to be a vegetarian or vegan before getting into it. Sadly for many it's just a trend instead of life investment.
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Old 05-15-2012, 09:47 AM   #24
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I make 2-3 "meatless" meals every week. It is not so much a choice to not eat meat, just that we have so many veggies, that adding some legumes (chick peas, lentils, beans) replaces the meat. It saves on the grocery bill <g>.
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Old 05-15-2012, 09:52 AM   #25
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I make 2-3 "meatless" meals every week. It is not so much a choice to not eat meat, just that we have so many veggies, that adding some legumes (chick peas, lentils, beans) replaces the meat. It saves on the grocery bill <g>.

I try to make a meal each week that includes a vegetable. Keeps Kathleen from whining...
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Old 05-15-2012, 12:57 PM   #26
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Even if you don't plan on becoming a vegetarian, it really isn't that difficult to eat one or two "meatless" meals a week.

Pasta with any variety of meatless sauces, pizza minus meat, grilled cheese or grilled veggie & cheese sandwiches & tomato soup, etc., etc. - are all items in many totally non-vegetarian menus.

Start with them & expand as you investigate all the many vegetarian options available to you that you think your family might enjoy.
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Old 05-15-2012, 01:52 PM   #27
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Vegetarian

You need to do some extensive research on this subject. Pros and Cons. I have serveral friends that are vegetarians but I know one that is having a lot of health issues from this lifestyle.

Please read below
The late Stephen Byrnes, PhD, RNCP, wrote an article in the Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients that dispelled many "myths" about the benefits of vegetarianism. In it he said, "many of the vegetarian claims cannot be substantiated and some are simply false and dangerous. There are benefits to vegetarian diets for certain health conditions, and some people function better on less fat and protein, but, as a practitioner who has dealt with several former vegetarians and vegans (total vegetarians), I know full well the dangerous effects of a diet devoid of healthful animal products."what one PHD's has to say. A lot has to do with the persons body chemistry and make up.
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Old 05-15-2012, 04:47 PM   #28
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I don't know what you would call this...political reasons maybe? The more I learn about slaughterhouse practices and other treatment of animals (i.e. lab testing, etc) the more I feel bad about eating meat.

I agree that you need some sort of protein with your meals and this is where I need to do more reading. I just thought I could substitute with stuff like beans and tofu or gluten. (?) I am the primary cook in the house so I have to factor stuff like that in as well.

Thanks for you input guys!
lets put a spin on this htc.....think outside the box.if your main objection is the slaughterhouse practices and,i guess,factory farming etc then why not buy free range & organic meats? true it is more expensive & harder to find the same range(at the moment) but usually(over here anyway) animal welfare & husbandry is to a far far higher standard on these farms than in a factory environment.as more & more people do this the industry grows & prices come down on the economies of scale,thus putting pressure on the factory farmers to either up standards to compete or shut down.a simplistic/idealistic view maybe but,over here,the price of free range/organic meats/eggs/dairy & veg have tumbled over the last few years for this reason.you see more & more shopping baskets with these products in them in the supermarket & the standard range produce all have animal welfare standard stickers on them.there is a greater range of free range/organic & barn eggs on the shelves than standard eggs.hellmans mayo & mcdonalds only use free range eggs & mcdonalds drinks only use organic milk(not sure if it's the same in the states).it can work!
what i'm really saying is that giving up meat for that reason isn't going to help the animals that will continue to be raised & slaughtered in the most horrific fashion.
but,that's just my opinion...........
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Old 05-15-2012, 04:52 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
You sound a little like me, though I'm not sure I would call my own reasons "political". Without going into too many of the gory details, let's just I just don't like some of the industrial agriculture practices used to produce meat for the masses. I don't think it's healthy for the animals or the people eating them.

I've never given up on meat, though I have cut down on it significantly and started buying it from what I consider to be better sources. Rather than get meat at the supermarket, I now buy it direct from the farm. And when I can't get that, I buy it at a co-op that sells locally raised meat from smaller farmers. If it's beef or lamb, I only buy 100% grass fed. Yes, it is more expensive, but I also feel it's more humanely raised and healthier. And because it's more expensive I don't eat as much of it.

Whereas my wife and I used to each down a 12 ounce steak in a single sitting, we now take an 8 ounce steak, cut it in half and eat 4 ounces each - all surrounded with lots of veggies. That, and a couple of eggs or some yogurt in the morning is all the animal based protein we eat in a single day.

Two days a week we eliminate the animal protein altogether and have a veggie protein day. Usually it's some sort of bean or tofu dish.

We've also upped our veggie intake overall.

Everyone has to do what they feel is right for themselves, but my suggestion is that if you like meat, eat it. Otherwise you'll always feel like you are missing something. But maybe just strive to make better choices, and replace some of that meat with fruits and vegetables.
sorry steve,read your post after i'd posted mine.guess we're mostly singing off the same hymn sheet on this one!
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Old 05-15-2012, 05:35 PM   #30
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I've been a vegetarian for maybe six months now. It can be challenging at times, but overall it's not too bad. I've always gravitated towards vegetarian food anyway so it's been a pretty easy change for me. However, I'm not a full vegetarian since I still do eat seafood, though I try and keep it to shellfish and cephalopods vs. bony fish. I think seafood is one of the healthiest things you can eat and I can't really have any moral qualms with eating fish, especially shellfish and cephalopods. Like, how cruel can it possibly be to eat a mussel or a clam? They don't even have brains, and barely a real nervous system.
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