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Old 09-04-2015, 10:56 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Add powdered gelatin to the gravy. Try to get gelatine made from grass fed beef. Knox gelatin is made mostly from pork bones. which is fine but bones from beef that was 100% pasture raised is my preference.
Gelatin is very good for us humans. Google the health benefits.
Corn starch and 'real' arrowroot powder react very differently when used in cooking.
Google has lots of info as to which one is the better choice given the food they are being used with.
If the gravy I'm making wasn't as dark as I like I'd sometimes use a little oyster sauce.
I use a little anchovy paste in every beef dish I make. Think anchovy>oysters. The suggestion of shellfish compliments beef dishes very well. Just the slightest suggestion.
I learned this tip many years ago from a classically trained French chef.
Any tips for chicken gravy? That is what she was most concerned with. She wants it to be darker. It was very pale and unappetizing.
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Old 09-05-2015, 10:21 AM   #12
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Any tips for chicken gravy? That is what she was most concerned with. She wants it to be darker. It was very pale and unappetizing.
She could add a little 'Tamari' to darken the gravy. It's gluten free and organic. A few drops is enough. It won't give a soy sauce flavor if used sparingly. It will add a little salty note so it's a good idea to season carefully after the gravy is made.
We know the key to a good gravy is to start with a good flavorful stock. Use the fond.
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Old 09-24-2015, 04:57 AM   #13
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Thanks for all the tips, folks. I'll have a look for some of those products, in particular the dark stocks and the Tamari. I have also been getting to know a lady recently who has coeliac disease - diagnosed at 57, having been ill since she was weaned as a baby - who told me of a product she uses which is available in our supermarkets here.

Gillian
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Old 09-24-2015, 07:42 AM   #14
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I've heard of people using Arrow root in place of flour. Also what about rice flour?


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I use arrowroot to thicken and Kitchen Bouquet or Maggi to darken the gravy.
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Old 09-24-2015, 11:08 AM   #15
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Some so-called 'arrowroot powder/flour' sold is tapioca flour. It's worth checking the label.
Arrowroot/tapioca flour will turn slimey if overheated. It's great for getting that shiny appearance on chinese food though.
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Old 11-04-2015, 05:38 AM   #16
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Hi All,

Thanks again for the tips. I haven't needed to make gluten free gravy recently as we have been having ready to cook roasts with stuffing included and my daughter has been having difficulty with swallowing, so traditional potatoes and veg that go along with a roast dinner are a no no for her.

I should also say that I have high blood pressure, so need to watch those salt levels and a lot of stock cubes and sauces are a no no for me.

I did see the idea of using an onion to brown the gravy, so might give that a go.
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Old 11-04-2015, 08:14 AM   #17
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As a thickening agent, cornstarch is a lot less expensive than arrowroot. I've used both and I didn't see that much better thickening effect with arrowroot over cornstarch. They both do equally well it seems to me. Arrowroot is so pricey over cornstarch. Is there an advantage?
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Old 11-04-2015, 10:00 AM   #18
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GilliAnne - you say, in your OP, that you liked the browning of cornflour (by heating it) but that it didn't readily mix with the water. It occurred to me that you may have tried to mix it in with cold water (the conventional way with cornflour), however, if the cornflour has been heated it might respond better with hot water/stock. Just a guess - have you tried it this way too?

If you favour the onion route for browning, I find potato flour an excellent thickener and prefer it to cornflour.
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Old 11-05-2015, 06:21 AM   #19
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I've study that Kitchen Aroma has gluten in it, so that might not be a great choice. If you can get lovely grain flour, that would perform better for lightly creating.
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Old 11-17-2015, 08:30 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by creative View Post
GilliAnne - you say, in your OP, that you liked the browning of cornflour (by heating it) but that it didn't readily mix with the water. It occurred to me that you may have tried to mix it in with cold water (the conventional way with cornflour), however, if the cornflour has been heated it might respond better with hot water/stock. Just a guess - have you tried it this way too?

If you favour the onion route for browning, I find potato flour an excellent thickener and prefer it to cornflour.
Thank you for pointing that out, Creative. Yes, I was using cold water and no, I haven't tried hot water, but will do so.

Thanks also for the tip about the potato flour - I don't often see that in our stores over here, but will look out for it. I haven't tried the onion trick yet.

Gilli
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