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Old 05-21-2014, 04:02 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by cave76 View Post


Beijing, China. Just sayin'.
Don't live in Beijing, China and have absolutely no sympathy for those that disrespect their environment. Hey, ya just can't fix stupid.
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Old 05-21-2014, 04:11 PM   #12
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Old 06-24-2014, 09:53 AM   #13
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Stevia will still leave you craving calories like any artificial sweetener. Stevia doesn't make syrups so it won't act like a sugar in recipes. Corn syr up, honey, maple is out of the question?
Interesting discussion on the radio yesterday. An American scientist called Swithers did some research that suggests that Artificial sweeteners appear to disturb the body's ability to count calories and, as a result, diet foods and drinks may wind up encouraging weight gain rather than weight loss

Apparently she's getting a lot of stick from the artificial sweetener manufacturers are up in arms abot her
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Old 06-24-2014, 01:28 PM   #14
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Interesting discussion on the radio yesterday. An American scientist called Swithers did some research that suggests that Artificial sweeteners appear to disturb the body's ability to count calories and, as a result, diet foods and drinks may wind up encouraging weight gain rather than weight loss

Apparently she's getting a lot of stick from the artificial sweetener manufacturers are up in arms abot her
I wouldn't doubt Swither's findings, even if all she studied were rats. But the reason I don't use artificial sweetener is simple: they taste awful to me.


ALL kinds of artificial sweeteners.
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Old 06-24-2014, 03:44 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
Thanks for the resource. Stevia is very different from manmade artificial sweeteners. It is an herb an has numerous health benefits. There are many articles online about it.
There are reliable sources and there are unreliable sources. Anyone can post whatever they want online, whether it's validated or not. So be careful which sources you choose to believe. Personally, I don't give credence to sites that don't provide scientific citations for their claims or that want to sell me something.
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Old 06-24-2014, 03:58 PM   #16
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If you want to, or need to, get away from sugar, forget all the artificial sweeteners and the natural sweeteners that leave a bad taste in your mouth, either literally or figuratively, and switch to agave nectar. It is a natural sweetener, has no funny taste, no aftertaste, and it won't spike your blood sugar levels like sugar, honey, maple syrup, HFCS, etc. It's the same stuff they use to make tequila, so how can you go wrong?
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Old 06-24-2014, 04:16 PM   #17
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" Agave syrup (also called agave nectar), often promoted as a healthy alternative to HFCS [high fructose corn syrup] (especially in diabetics), is very high in fructose, although there is some disagreement over how much fructose it contains. According to the USDA, the sugar in cooked agave is 87% fructose (due to breakdown of fructans — a starch-like polymer of fructose — in the plant when it is cooked) [6]. A wholesale supplier of agave syrup, however, lists the fructose as 70 — 75% of the total sugar in their syrup [13]. Either way, agave syrup is higher in fructose than any other natural sweetener (and any form of HFCS except HFCS 90). "

High Fructose Corn Syrup: Tasty Toxin or Slandered Sweetener? « Science-Based Medicine

(Harriet Hall, retired Air Force surgeon, is one of the editors of Science Based Medicine.)

"Agave nectar or syrup is as high as 90% concentrated fructose (a simple sugar that occurs naturally in fruit), and the rest glucose. But the agave you can buy ranges from 90% to as little as 55% fructose (similar to high-fructose corn syrup), depending on the processing, says Roger Clemens, professor at the University of Southern California and a spokesman for the Institute of Food Technologists."

The Truth About Agave
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Old 06-24-2014, 04:25 PM   #18
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Also from Harriet Hall and Science Based Medicine about stevia:

"Is Stevia Safer?

Stevia comes from a plant, and the Guaraní Indians of South America have been using it to sweeten their yerba mate for centuries. The “natural fallacy” and the “ancient wisdom fallacy” sway many consumers, but for those of us who are critical thinkers, who want to avoid logical fallacies and look at the scientific evidence, what does science tell us?

Is stevia preferable to aspartame? We really don’t know. Concerns have been raised about possible adverse effects such as cancer and birth defects. Stevia is banned in most European countries and in Singapore and Hong Kong because their regulatory agencies felt that there was insufficient toxicological evidence to demonstrate its safety. The US banned its import in 1991 as a food additive, but the 1994 Diet Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) legalized its sale as a dietary supplement. Most of the safety concerns have been dismissed, but so have the concerns about aspartame. Arguably, the concerns about stevia are more valid than those about aspartame, because there is less evidence refuting them.

The plant extract is refined using ethanol, methanol, crystallization and separation technologies to separate the various glycoside molecules. The Coca-Cola Company sells it as Truvia. Pepsi sells it as PureVia. It is a product of major corporations and is prepared in a laboratory using “toxic” chemicals like methanol. For some reason that doesn’t bother those who are promoting stevia as a natural product."

Note: since that writing stevia is now allowed in most European countries.


Artificial Sweeteners: Is Aspartame Safe? « Science-Based Medicine
Harriet Hall is also a founding member and Fellow for Institute for Science in Medicine (ISM)
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Old 06-24-2014, 04:41 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cave76 View Post
" Agave syrup (also called agave nectar), often promoted as a healthy alternative to HFCS [high fructose corn syrup] (especially in diabetics), is very high in fructose, although there is some disagreement over how much fructose it contains. According to the USDA, the sugar in cooked agave is 87% fructose (due to breakdown of fructans — a starch-like polymer of fructose — in the plant when it is cooked) [6]. A wholesale supplier of agave syrup, however, lists the fructose as 70 — 75% of the total sugar in their syrup [13]. Either way, agave syrup is higher in fructose than any other natural sweetener (and any form of HFCS except HFCS 90). "

High Fructose Corn Syrup: Tasty Toxin or Slandered Sweetener? « Science-Based Medicine

(Harriet Hall, retired Air Force surgeon, is one of the editors of Science Based Medicine.)

"Agave nectar or syrup is as high as 90% concentrated fructose (a simple sugar that occurs naturally in fruit), and the rest glucose. But the agave you can buy ranges from 90% to as little as 55% fructose (similar to high-fructose corn syrup), depending on the processing, says Roger Clemens, professor at the University of Southern California and a spokesman for the Institute of Food Technologists."

The Truth About Agave
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Old 06-24-2014, 04:41 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cave76 View Post
Also from Harriet Hall and Science Based Medicine about stevia:

"Is Stevia Safer?

Stevia comes from a plant, and the Guaraní Indians of South America have been using it to sweeten their yerba mate for centuries. The “natural fallacy” and the “ancient wisdom fallacy” sway many consumers, but for those of us who are critical thinkers, who want to avoid logical fallacies and look at the scientific evidence, what does science tell us?

Is stevia preferable to aspartame? We really don’t know. Concerns have been raised about possible adverse effects such as cancer and birth defects. Stevia is banned in most European countries and in Singapore and Hong Kong because their regulatory agencies felt that there was insufficient toxicological evidence to demonstrate its safety. The US banned its import in 1991 as a food additive, but the 1994 Diet Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) legalized its sale as a dietary supplement. Most of the safety concerns have been dismissed, but so have the concerns about aspartame. Arguably, the concerns about stevia are more valid than those about aspartame, because there is less evidence refuting them.

The plant extract is refined using ethanol, methanol, crystallization and separation technologies to separate the various glycoside molecules. The Coca-Cola Company sells it as Truvia. Pepsi sells it as PureVia. It is a product of major corporations and is prepared in a laboratory using “toxic” chemicals like methanol. For some reason that doesn’t bother those who are promoting stevia as a natural product."

Note: since that writing stevia is now allowed in most European countries.


Artificial Sweeteners: Is Aspartame Safe? « Science-Based Medicine
Harriet Hall is also a founding member and Fellow for Institute for Science in Medicine (ISM)
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