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Old 06-24-2013, 10:55 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
Yes! We frequent Cozumel. Eggs are in abundance, sitting unrefrigerated in the middle of the store on huge pallets. No fresh milk to be found, it's all in cartons on the shelf that are good for 2 years or more. Not too bad if it's chilled.
But it's vile in tea!
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Old 06-24-2013, 11:03 AM   #32
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Here in the states weekly food shopping is the norm. We have large refrigerators. Most people don't go to the market for their large shop more than once a week, if they do it is to fill in little things.

I buy eggs 2 dozen at a time from the farmer's market, it isn't as easy to get to so I have to go on my day off. Supermarkets here rarely carry local fresh eggs.
Supermarkets rarely carry fresh eggs period! By the time they've been shunted from place to place and driven several times round the country they are tired to say the least.
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Old 06-24-2013, 11:39 AM   #33
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I've experienced the opposite, for me they separate easier and cleaner when room temp. I use my hand to separate (let the whites slip through my fingers) and when room temp, it seems like the white separates cleanly from the yolk, so when I place the yolk in the bowl there is no white around the yolk.

It seems to me the yoke tends to break more easily when at room temp. But I do use the rotating from shell to shell to separate. It's also easier to pick out that little cloudy clump when cold. I just don't like that in there, lol.
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Old 06-24-2013, 11:49 AM   #34
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It's also easier to pick out that little cloudy clump when cold. I just don't like that in there, lol.


I have a friend (who is usually quite centered and sane) who will NOT eat those "little clumps." LOL

I finally looked up what they are---chalazae.

"An egg yolk is basically a bag of concentrated food for the development of a chicken embryo if the egg is fertilized. It doesn’t float around freely inside the clear egg white, but is anchored to the shell by two little twisted ropes called chalazae (pronounced cuh-LAY-zee), and these are the white things you are talking about. One chalaza connects the yolk at the more pointed end of the egg and the other at the rounder end. This tethering ensures that the yolk is protected against hitting the inner walls of the egg if the egg is moved around."

"As eggs age, these structures start to disappear, so clearly visible chalazae are a good sign your eggs are fresh."
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Old 06-24-2013, 12:06 PM   #35
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I have a friend (who is usually quite centered and sane) who will NOT eat those "little clumps." LOL

I finally looked up what they are---chalazae.

"An egg yolk is basically a bag of concentrated food for the development of a chicken embryo if the egg is fertilized. It doesn’t float around freely inside the clear egg white, but is anchored to the shell by two little twisted ropes called chalazae (pronounced cuh-LAY-zee), and these are the white things you are talking about. One chalaza connects the yolk at the more pointed end of the egg and the other at the rounder end. This tethering ensures that the yolk is protected against hitting the inner walls of the egg if the egg is moved around."

"As eggs age, these structures start to disappear, so clearly visible chalazae are a good sign your eggs are fresh."
I was thinking it could possibly be the embryo so I could never make myself leave it in, lol. So I learned something new today...
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Old 06-24-2013, 12:39 PM   #36
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Just read this thread. I really miss CWS. She would have had a lot to say about eggs.

My grandma always told us not to wash the eggs after getting them from the coop. She said that we needed to wait until right before cracking to wash because that was how they were kept fresh, and she kept them in the pantry. I have always kept my eggs in the refrigerator because they look really clean when I buy them, so I know someone washed them too early.
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Old 06-24-2013, 06:46 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by cave76 View Post


I have a friend (who is usually quite centered and sane) who will NOT eat those "little clumps." LOL

I finally looked up what they are---chalazae.

"An egg yolk is basically a bag of concentrated food for the development of a chicken embryo if the egg is fertilized. It doesn’t float around freely inside the clear egg white, but is anchored to the shell by two little twisted ropes called chalazae (pronounced cuh-LAY-zee), and these are the white things you are talking about. One chalaza connects the yolk at the more pointed end of the egg and the other at the rounder end. This tethering ensures that the yolk is protected against hitting the inner walls of the egg if the egg is moved around."

"As eggs age, these structures start to disappear, so clearly visible chalazae are a good sign your eggs are fresh."
Well that explains why the eggs from the farmer's market (fresh, really free roaming, outdoors chickens) have a much more visible white thingy.
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Old 03-12-2015, 11:07 PM   #38
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I buy my eggs locally, and get them unwashed, which allows me to keep them at room temperature at all times without fear of spoilage. When they are washed, it removes a natural coating, "cuticle" if I remember correctly, that creates a natural barrier to bacteria and spoilage. I find that eggs are easier to deal with at room temperature.
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