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Old 11-15-2013, 10:48 PM   #51
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I actually prefer a roasted turkey anyway, Alton Brown's brine makes the perfect turkey and it is much less cleanup than a turkey fryer!
+1.

I've been using Alton's brine method for years and couldn't be more pleased. Awesome turkey.

One thing I use to make the brining process easier is to brine the bird in a big orange drink cooler. You know the kind. Like the ones sports coaches are drenched with liquid at the end of a winning game.

Makes transport easy, keeps the contents cold for a long while and is easy to drain (from the spigot) before removing the turkey. I bought ours at a thrift store for next to nothing.
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Old 11-15-2013, 10:58 PM   #52
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I actually prefer a roasted turkey anyway, Alton Brown's brine makes the perfect turkey and it is much less cleanup than a turkey fryer!
I agree. I make the AB recipe every year. I was just offering a solution for gravy with a deep fried turkey.
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Old 11-15-2013, 11:00 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie H View Post

+1.

I've been using Alton's brine method for years and couldn't be more pleased. Awesome turkey.

One thing I use to make the brining process easier is to brine the bird in a big orange drink cooler. You know the kind. Like the ones sports coaches are drenched with liquid at the end of a winning game.

Makes transport easy, keeps the contents cold for a long while and is easy to drain (from the spigot) before removing the turkey. I bought ours at a thrift store for next to nothing.
I've been buying brining bags the last couple of years and those work great. Luckily we have a mini fridge in the den so I can put it there and it isn't taking up space in the kitchen fridge. One year it was cool enough here that I could leave a bucket outside and it stayed cold enough, the ice didn't even completely melt.
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Old 11-15-2013, 11:19 PM   #54
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That's when you buy some turkey parts and roast them. Roasted parts make some stock and the drippings go into the gravy. Add a little roux and seasonings and you're done.
I do that every year even with oven roasted turkey. There is never enough gravy to keep up with the leftovers. A week or so before Thanksgiving I buy a couple of wings or necks, roast them, make a stock and freeze it until the day before the meal. Make ahead gravy really helps stretch the pan drippings gravy for hot turkey sandwiches, leftover turkey casseroles and such. Heading to the store tomorrow to buy some parts and get that started.
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Old 11-15-2013, 11:23 PM   #55
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I do that every year even with oven roasted turkey. There is never enough gravy to keep up with the leftovers. A week or so before Thanksgiving I buy a couple of wings or necks, roast them, make a stock and freeze it until the day before the meal. Make ahead gravy really helps stretch the pan drippings gravy for hot turkey sandwiches, leftover turkey casseroles and such. Heading to the store tomorrow to buy some parts and get that started.
I bought a whole store brand turkey for that reason. Made stock and have three meals of turkey for sometime in the future. All for about $7.00 or $8.00.
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Old 11-16-2013, 12:07 AM   #56
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Great deal! I would so do that if I had the fridge space.
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Old 11-16-2013, 12:02 PM   #57
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I have a pile of people coming for dinner. This includes 5 vegetarians.

Peanut Soup
Turkey (2 of them)
Herbed dressing with giblets
Herbed dressing with nuts (vegetarian)
Gravy made from boiled and roasted turkey bits
Veggie gravy (stock from roasted veg)
Cranberry relish (cooked)
Cranberry relish (raw)
Mashed spuds
Baked Yams and w/sliced apples
Relish tray
Steamed Green Beans/ with toasted hazlenuts
Corn, cheddar and chile custard

Pumpkin Pie
Chocolate Pecan pie
Gingered Apple sorbet

Iced tea
WA state Malbac
Homemade Ginger-lime "beer" (no-alcohol)
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Old 11-16-2013, 02:01 PM   #58
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How long can I safely hold a thawed turkey, in the original packaging, prior to cooking it?

I have seen from 1-5 days on various sites, any thoughts?

The answer I want is 3 or 4 days, with no trips to the emergency room!
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Old 11-16-2013, 04:34 PM   #59
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How long can I safely hold a thawed turkey, in the original packaging, prior to cooking it?

I have seen from 1-5 days on various sites, any thoughts?

The answer I want is 3 or 4 days, with no trips to the emergency room!

I know that poultry in the grocery store has up to 2 weeks shelf life, so I imagine that a few days kept cold would be fine.
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Old 11-16-2013, 09:37 PM   #60
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I'll actually have people over this year, so I'm planning on a feast.

Alton Brown's Brined Turkey w/gravy
Italian sausage and Parmesan dressing
Mashed potatoes
Brown sugar, roasted sweet potatoes
Bacon sautéed Brussels sprouts
Green Beans
Buttered corn
Homemade Parker House bread rolls

Pumpkin Pie and Pecan Pie for dessert
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