"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-31-2014, 01:24 PM   #1
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,844
Fall Garden

My spring garden is close to ending and was very successful.

I am considering a fall garden. I never had a fall garden and had a couple questions.

1) What type of veggies would work best?
2) When should I plant them.
3) Since its a fall garden, it seems it will go into winter. Is this correct.
4) Is it to late to use seeds?

Thanks in Advance
__________________

__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2014, 01:35 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,893
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I have never had the opportunity to have a fall garden. Do you like snow peas? I know they like cooler weather.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2014, 01:38 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,127
Kale, lettuces, radishes, a second planting of green beans if you start them now, any leftover seeds you have might be worth a shot. When is your usual first frost date? Kale can handle some frost.
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2014, 01:41 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,913
Hi, RB. We're getting our fall garden going right now. We removed our cucumbers last week and planted green bean seeds. There will be more fall stuff going in the ground soon. Here is a guide for South Carolina and answers to your questions: What Vegetables Grow in Fall & Winter in South Carolina? | Garden Guides

1) Cool-season veggies include beans, peas, lettuces, and leafy greens like collards and kale, and onions and garlic.

2) You can start now, but you will need to keep an eye on them and make sure they get enough water.

3) Some will winter over, like leafy greens and lettuces. You can pick from the plants and they will start new leaves, so you can keep harvesting from them all season. Onions and garlic can be harvested next spring.

4) Not at all. First, find out the average first frost date for your area: South Carolina Interactive First Frost Map Then look at the seed packets and find out how long it will be before you can harvest the veggies. For example, suppose a packet of bean seeds says it's 60 days to harvest and in Columbia, SC, the first frost date is Nov. 21. The latest you can plant the seeds and have a harvest before the first expected frost is about Sept. 21. So you can plant anytime from now through Sept. 21. Just remember to keep seedlings watered.

Hope this helps.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2014, 02:16 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,844
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Hi, RB. We're getting our fall garden going right now. We removed our cucumbers last week and planted green bean seeds. There will be more fall stuff going in the ground soon. Here is a guide for South Carolina and answers to your questions: What Vegetables Grow in Fall & Winter in South Carolina? | Garden Guides

1) Cool-season veggies include beans, peas, lettuces, and leafy greens like collards and kale, and onions and garlic.

2) You can start now, but you will need to keep an eye on them and make sure they get enough water.

3) Some will winter over, like leafy greens and lettuces. You can pick from the plants and they will start new leaves, so you can keep harvesting from them all season. Onions and garlic can be harvested next spring.

4) Not at all. First, find out the average first frost date for your area: South Carolina Interactive First Frost Map Then look at the seed packets and find out how long it will be before you can harvest the veggies. For example, suppose a packet of bean seeds says it's 60 days to harvest and in Columbia, SC, the first frost date is Nov. 21. The latest you can plant the seeds and have a harvest before the first expected frost is about Sept. 21. So you can plant anytime from now through Sept. 21. Just remember to keep seedlings watered.

Hope this helps.
It helps me very much. Thank you.
I will check the links you provided. I am in zone 7b.
__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2014, 04:22 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,766
i started my summer garden pretty late so i'm just harvesting peppers and tomatoes now.

i left enough room between the rows, however, for a fall garden. sugar snap peas, snow peas, arugula, romaine, mesculun mix, and radishes will hopefully fit between the summer rows.

the leafy greens are done from seed. i over plant the heck out of the greens so that as they sprout and grow, my first few pickings to thin out the rows are what foo-foo joints call micro-greens.
the next few pickings to continue thinning are baby greens.
the rest are just what they are, lol.
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2014, 08:18 PM   #7
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 21
I am just starting my spring garden here down under. Nothing nicer or better for you than growing your own organic vegetables and fruit.
__________________
philkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2014, 09:31 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,913
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
i the leafy greens are done from seed. i over plant the heck out of the greens so that as they sprout and grow, my first few pickings to thin out the rows are what foo-foo joints call micro-greens.
the next few pickings to continue thinning are baby greens.
the rest are just what they are, lol.
Hee hee! It's all about the marketing
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.