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Old 07-10-2018, 05:09 AM   #11
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At least a wild rabbit has a good life until the last coup de gras. In England they can ruin crops. A friend of mine has a gun (yes, that is unusual in UK - He's ex-army and currently in the territorials so he knows what he's doing). He has a licence for it in order to shoot rabbits for local farmers who'd rather have a good shot to kill the rabbits humanely than do it themselves and not make clean kills. He sells the corpses to a local butcher so the rabbits don't die in vain.
In this country, many public land purchases and conservation projects are partially supported by funds from excise taxes on the purchase of firearms and ammunition. This is provided for by the Pittman-Robertson Act from 1937. I believe that in most states you must take a hunter safety course before you can purchase a hunting license.
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Old 07-10-2018, 09:31 AM   #12
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I’ve always wondered why the Americans and Europeans are horrified at the Asian tradition of raising dogs for meat and consuming them, but glorify cooked rabbit as a delicacy.
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Don’t get me wrong, raising dogs for food isn’t something I support. It’s not even something I’m comfortable with. I’m just saying, how can you make an argument against dogs as food while you’re dining on braised rabbit?
Dogs have partnered with man for 1000's of years, worked with him and for him, shown love and loyalty and intelligence. Rabbits rob your garden, dig holes in your pasture, and generally make a pest of themselves. Rabbits come from the same family as rats and mice, neither of which is generally considered a loving, devoted friend like a dog is. That's all the reason I need to differentiate my feelings about the two species.

I've tasted rabbit in a Moroccan restaurant - wasn't overly impressed, but that might be just me. I don't think I could eat dog if I was starving. In fact, a hungry man will still share what little food he has with his dog.... never heard of anyone doing that with a rabbit.

Dog's and cats (I'm not a cat person, but I still see them in a similar vein as dogs) have been loyal companions to man for too long to be viewed as just "food". The mere thought is repugnant - it would be quite literally the same as cannibalism to me.
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Old 07-10-2018, 10:58 AM   #13
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I quite agree - dogs and cats are able to 'bond' with their owners. In Italy, rabbits can be pests. They're considered food, and are mostly raised as such. Dogs have a job to do, which is to guard the premises. Strangers know they shouldn't approach them. Then there are the miniature dogs lap dogs and small guard dogs like corgis, the hunting dogs (wild boar, etc.), and setters and that category too, for flushing out game birds, and wild rabbits and game birds. It must be like that in the USA. Nothing that is out of the ordinary. But the way they kill dogs in Korea is sickening.

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Old 07-10-2018, 11:12 AM   #14
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Donít get me wrong, raising dogs for food isnít something I support. Itís not even something Iím comfortable with. Iím just saying, how can you make an argument against dogs as food while youíre dining on braised rabbit?
Same goes with horses, hamsters, squirrels. I'm sure there is more.

And yet, I still think Joel is right, or at least the way I understood him. It is not America business to tell other countries what and how to eat. I've eaten dog. Though I did not know what I was eating. Had a lot of Korean friends in college. There was a large stray dog living near dorm, one day Koreans were having party. But dog was no more. Can't say I liked it, can't say I did not like it. But in the same meal we had vodka with the snake inside the bottle, after drinking that and chasing with the piece of snake, I think you can eat anything. Same with horse meat. It makes the best salami, used to love it. And in Mongolia it is sold as canned meat, sort of like canned chicken here.

I think it's bad enough that all these powerful countries are mangeling in politics of others, for sure there should not be any interference in food industry.
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Old 07-10-2018, 11:18 AM   #15
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... Kosher is a bit more difficult to accommodate, as not only the food has to be kosher; the cookware in which itís prepared and the utensils used in preparation, and the dishes in which it is served must also be kosher as well, and if there is anything my kitchen is not, itís kosher!


Add the stove and oven into that line.
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Old 07-10-2018, 11:21 AM   #16
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Iíve always wondered why the Americans and Europeans are horrified at the Asian tradition of raising dogs for meat and consuming them, but glorify cooked rabbit as a delicacy.
Perhaps for the same reason they villify raising and eating veal, but have no problem with lamb?
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Old 07-10-2018, 07:49 PM   #17
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No, Iím not a vegan, not even a vegetarian, although I seldom eat beef or pork. I do love my chicken and fish though, and eggs and milk products are absolute essentials in my kitchen. I guess that makes me guilty of the egregiously inhumane treatment and slaughter of millions of animals, not to mention a major contributor to global warming and the countryís carbon footprint.

And Iíve eaten some strictly verboten items, from whale meat to shark fins, although I had no idea what the soup was at our hosted Chinese feast until it was finished. Iíve never eaten that again, but not out of concerns for the ecology; it simply wasnít very good at all, definitely not good enough to kill millions of sharks for. The whale meat was actually quite good, like very lean steak with a seafood umami quality. I imagine you can guess in which country I had this delicacy; and it is indeed a delicacy, even in Japan, whose merciless and cruel policies regarding whales I wholly condemn. It is very expensive, and in the few restaurants itís served, itís in very small quantities.

I also had rabbit once, again in Japan, but in a French restaurant. And again, I was not aware it was rabbit until the meal was over. I would never knowingly eat rabbit for the same reason I would never eat dog; to me, they are humansí companions, to be cherished, not sautťed. Iím sure there are some who feel the same way about fowl, be it chicken, duck, or goose. Iíll bet there are several aquarium enthusiasts who refrain from pescatarian dishes for the same reason.

Perhaps my thinking is hypocritical, perhaps just confused. I wonít try to defend it, especially here, where conversation is about food and not culinary politics. And I gladly cater to vegan or vegetarian guests for whom I cook, as well as those who are gluten-free, or allergic to peanuts or shellfish or any of the other dozen or so food allergies that have cropped up in recent years. Kosher is a bit more difficult to accommodate, as not only the food has to be kosher; the cookware in which itís prepared and the utensils used in preparation, and the dishes in which it is served must also be kosher as well, and if there is anything my kitchen is not, itís kosher!
The vegan question wasn't an accusation, just a interested query.

Regarding rabbits as pests - in many countries wild rabbits are a serious threat to food production. In the early 1900s Western Australia was so infested that they tried to build a fence to keep rabbits out. I admit that they can be excellent pets but we don't eat our pets.Rabbits for the pot are sourced from rabbit farming or from culling wild rabbits and the latter are a different kettle of fish from the former

We are lucky were I live. The local butcher has his own slaughter set up and prides himself on knowing which farm any piece of meat in his shop came from. If we are going to eat dead animals I think it incumbent on us to be aware of how they are treated and to make sure we only buy our meat from sources which treat their "victims" with proper care and attention.

Incidentally, one of the local butcher's slaughter men left to take on a better paid job in a large commercial slaughter house. He only managed a few weeks before asking for his old job back - He said that he couldn't stand the way the big abbatoir treated the animals and conducted their demise despite the methods being within the law - just!
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Old 07-10-2018, 09:23 PM   #18
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When my brother and I were young'uns, we moved from the 'burbs in Riverside County to a 5-acre place in the high desert of Kern County. There were several outbuildings, a barn, and a stable on the property - I was so excited to move there because I would be able to have my horse on our own property instead of having to board her.

My dad decided if he was going to have a horse on his new property, he may as well raise chickens and rabbits. He researched the care and raising of rabbits, fixed up one of the outbuildings, installed a swamp cooler for their comfort, built some big cages, and bought some rabbits. I learned real quick to not make friends with them and to put out of my memory of how they met their demise....but I also remember some delicious fried, stewed, and braised rabbit meals on the dinner table.
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Old 07-12-2018, 12:21 PM   #19
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Dogs have partnered with man for 1000's of years, worked with him and for him, shown love and loyalty and intelligence. Rabbits rob your garden, dig holes in your pasture, and generally make a pest of themselves. Rabbits come from the same family as rats and mice, neither of which is generally considered a loving, devoted friend like a dog is. That's all the reason I need to differentiate my feelings about the two species.

I've tasted rabbit in a Moroccan restaurant - wasn't overly impressed, but that might be just me. I don't think I could eat dog if I was starving. In fact, a hungry man will still share what little food he has with his dog.... never heard of anyone doing that with a rabbit.

Dog's and cats (I'm not a cat person, but I still see them in a similar vein as dogs) have been loyal companions to man for too long to be viewed as just "food". The mere thought is repugnant - it would be quite literally the same as cannibalism to me.
And dogs and cats are, to a certain extent, working animals. My house is surrounded by fields and my cat is on the payroll - she's a demon mouser and catches every one that finds its way into the kitchen (she also catches birds but she's a cat and doesn't understand the difference).

In the UK we don't have a tradition of eating horses (except, possibly, in wartime when food is desperately short). Why would we eat the animal who, in the past, helped fight our battles, provided us with transport, laboured in our fields, helped us gather wood for our fires, take our goods to market and currently helps exercise us and our children and gives pleasure and companionship to adults and children alike and can be trained (like dogs) to be assistance animals. As for dogs, they have guarded our homes and helped us catch our food, guided the blind and assisted people with all sorts of illnesses to live safe lives, minded our babies (as the neighbour's dog did when Mother put me out in my pram for fresh air - he sat by my pram and barked when I cried and growled at passing strangers). Would anyone want to eat friends like that?

A rabbit is a whole other issue. Wild rabbits are a pest and a serious threat to agriculture. They can decimate crops both on farms and in private gardens.
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Old 07-12-2018, 02:35 PM   #20
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MC, your neighbors across the pan don't seem to mind eating horse meat. But then they also eat frogs that is absolutely disgusting looking creature.
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