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Old 03-18-2018, 12:37 PM   #1
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Farm raised rabbit

This a recipe that requires 1 farmyard raised rabbit - wild won't do - that's very popular in Italy, especially in the Italian Western Riviera. It's truly delicious. The thing that appeals to me is that there aren't very many ingredients:
1 large rabbit, jointed
1 large onion
equal quantities of fresh sage, bay leaves and fresh rosemary
80 grams of 80 taggiasche olives
2 spoonsful of pine nuts
250 ml light white wine
EVOO

Place the rabbit pieces in a frying pan,nothing else, on low, to draw the juices out.When the juices dry out remove the rabbit pieces and rinse the pan. Throw the juices away.
Put 1 - 2 tbsp, and add the onion and garlic, and then the pine nuts and the herbs. Cook on a low heat for 50-60 mins, adding the stock a little at a time. After 30 mins, add the olives, and when they are soft, and the sauce is reduced a bit by half, serve

The Ligurian olives are small, black, soft, and fruity vis ŗ vis other olives, and this recipe requires such similar, in olive oil and not brine.


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Old 03-21-2018, 07:48 AM   #2
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I’ve always wondered why the Americans and Europeans are horrified at the Asian tradition of raising dogs for meat and consuming them, but glorify cooked rabbit as a delicacy.
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Old 03-21-2018, 07:51 AM   #3
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I’ve always wondered why the Americans and Europeans are horrified at the Asian tradition of raising dogs for meat and consuming them, but glorify cooked rabbit as a delicacy.
Don’t get me wrong, raising dogs for food isn’t something I support. It’s not even something I’m comfortable with. I’m just saying, how can you make an argument against dogs as food while you’re dining on braised rabbit?
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Old 03-21-2018, 08:21 AM   #4
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Donít get me wrong, raising dogs for food isnít something I support. Itís not even something Iím comfortable with. Iím just saying, how can you make an argument against dogs as food while youíre dining on braised rabbit?
Cultural differences.
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Old 03-21-2018, 01:09 PM   #5
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Cultural differences.
Then why do Americans and Europeans advocate for the elimination of the dog-for-food industry in Korea? Shouldn’t we all just mind our own business while eating our rabbits and goat? “We don’t eat dogs, that’s disgusting! So you shouldn’t eat dogs either,” is a very narrow point of view. And Koreans aren’t going around advertising “try some dog thigh in your next stew! You’ll love it.”

And what about monkeys? They are consumed regularly in Southeast Asia with no moral outrage from anywhere else in the world. I do understand that a lot of the outrage is over the way dogs are raised for food, I’m right in line with those people, but shouldn’t we be taking care of our own treatment of livestock before we worry about practices halfway round the world?

I’m playing devil’s advocate here. I could no sooner eat dog meat than I could eat dog poop. The very thought is repugnant.
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Old 03-21-2018, 02:56 PM   #6
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I don't know. There's a lot of information here if you're really interested.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_...in_South_Korea
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Old 03-21-2018, 04:13 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by di reston View Post
This a recipe that requires 1 farmyard raised rabbit - wild won't do - that's very popular in Italy, especially in the Italian Western Riviera. It's truly delicious. The thing that appeals to me is that there aren't very many ingredients:
1 large rabbit, jointed
1 large onion
equal quantities of fresh sage, bay leaves and fresh rosemary
80 grams of 80 taggiasche olives
2 spoonsful of pine nuts
250 ml light white wine
EVOO

Place the rabbit pieces in a frying pan,nothing else, on low, to draw the juices out.When the juices dry out remove the rabbit pieces and rinse the pan. Throw the juices away.
Put 1 - 2 tbsp, and add the onion and garlic, and then the pine nuts and the herbs. Cook on a low heat for 50-60 mins, adding the stock a little at a time. After 30 mins, add the olives, and when they are soft, and the sauce is reduced a bit by half, serve

The Ligurian olives are small, black, soft, and fruity vis ŗ vis other olives, and this recipe requires such similar, in olive oil and not brine.


di reston


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di - Is that oil or broth for doing the onion and garlic? I didn't realize rabbit would have so much liquid. Having never done rabbit (another on my to do list) I can only go by how they look at the grocer's. Rather dry looking.
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Old 03-23-2018, 12:10 PM   #8
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The method is: fry off the rabbit pieces, then add the onions and garlic and lower the heat. SautŤ this and when the onions start to get soft, add the black olives. The olives are the real ingredient that make this dish, together with the pine nuts. Then add your white wine and cook on a low heat until the meat is tender and comes off the bones. That's when it's ready. A little fresh rosemary enhances the flavours. The juices are an important element with this, and they're delicous mopped up withy rustic bread.


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