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Old 12-10-2011, 04:32 AM   #1
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Okra

I grew okra successfully this year (Direct seeded). I want to plant it again. I just heard on a tv show to soak the seeds overnight in either milk or buttermilk. Doing so shortens the germination time (5-7 days for it to sprout) and supposedly you can harvest it much earlier. I'm going to try it this year! BTW, it doesn't transplant well, at least not in my experiments with okra.
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Old 12-10-2011, 04:51 AM   #2
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After 40 years I've finally succeeded in persuading my wife to use more okra in her cooking.
Do you grow any indoors?
When do you plant it outdoors?
Is okra critter resistant?
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Old 12-10-2011, 04:59 AM   #3
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I direct seeded late May. I had tried to start it indoors, but the plants died when transplanted. I haven't tried growing it indoors year around. I didn't have any critter problems with the okra. Just don't let the pods get big--then they are woody. I was in MN and my DH left some of the pods (6 in.)because he didn't know what to do with it--good for seeds, but woody.
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Old 12-10-2011, 05:15 AM   #4
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Two to three inches long is fine by me. I like them as a thickener in vegetable soup.
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Old 12-10-2011, 06:36 AM   #5
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I have grown it before. I used to steal a blossom to put in my hat. A pretty hibiscus, yellow with a deep velvet red throat.

They grow so fast, you have to snip the pods off when they are small, sometimes saving them until you have enough.

Also I find that if I use slices in a gumbo or jambalaya, they aren't slimy if you cook them awhile. Not being able to grow them now, I like to use the sliced frozen okra.

Do you have a recipe for fried okra? It was my very first favorite food when I was 5 y/o. The landlady would call my mom to say she was making fried okra and did I want to come over and have some.

She would set me a plate of them on the open oven door, and I would sit there in my little chair and scarf them all up!

I've never been able to get a coating to stick properly, but know that corn flake crumbs taste great with them.

I tried buying the prebreaded frozen okra, but don't care for the breading.

I wonder if I could use Timothy's fritter batter and just make fritters?

Good thread, CWS. I love okra.
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Old 12-10-2011, 06:50 AM   #6
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I beat up an egg and slice the okra into it. Then I bread it with a 50/50 mix of cornmeal and flour, seasoned with salt and pepper. Deepfry in vegetable oil, 375, til brown and crispy. I leave little pods whole and cut the bigger pods into 2 or 3 pieces, so the breading doesn't overwhelm the okra. (If you are out of eggs, or just don't care to use them, slice the okra and put just a little water on it and let it sit a few minutes. The 'slime' will make the breading stick.)

I have direct seeded and grown seedlings indoors. Plant when the soil is warm--okra doesn't like to get cold.

I remember the first time I ate okra--I was about 6, and my older cousins bet my grandma that I wouldn't like it. My grandma took me aside and paid me twenty six cents (probably all she could scrounge up) to eat it and tell them I liked it. It was breaded and fried, and I did like it, but I kept the twenty six cents anyway.
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Old 12-10-2011, 09:44 AM   #7
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I've grown okra many times in the past. I seem to remember the seed coming up pretty fast normally (within few couple days). I bet a lot has to do with soil temperature because they LOVE the heat. They're pretty much the only thing that consistently produces through the summer down here while most everything else melts in the heat by August. They'll be 6 or 7 feet tall by then. I have transplanted them successfully, but it works better if you plant them in those cell packs, 1 plant per cell (they normally sell them as many seedlings in one pot that you have to break up and plant almost bear-rooted).

When I make fried okra, I coat with flour, then egg, then cornmeal. I also make sure to salt the okra directly, salt the egg, and salt the finished fried okra because it can be kinda bland if you don't. Also, I like to add a little baking powder to the flour which will get you rounder okras, like how they are at restaurants. That's my secret don't tell anyone, lol.
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Old 12-10-2011, 10:03 AM   #8
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I tried growing okra, and had three plants come up. It never gave me enough to fry. A pod here. A pod there. How many plants do I need to get enough for a plate of okra?

I absolutely love fried okra, but health-concerns these days...

I bought okra at the farmer's market this year and roasted it according to this recipe. The okra came out delicious and I did not miss the fried okra at all! I roasted mine whole rather than slice them up.
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Old 12-11-2011, 09:44 AM   #9
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I sometimes take little pods, toss them with olive oil and salt, and put them in a hot cast iron pan. Move them around until they are browned on the edges and tender. Or put them in a grill basket and grill them.
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Old 12-11-2011, 01:14 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
I wonder if I could use Timothy's fritter batter and just make fritters?

Good thread, CWS. I love okra.
I"ve never made or even seen Okra fritters, but I can only imagine they would be good.

Deep fried to a golden brown, then eaten with a goodly amount of butter on each bite! Oh Yeah...
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