"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-29-2014, 11:33 AM   #1
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,859
8 Things Nutrition Experts Wish You Would Stop Saying About Food

Love this: 8 Things Nutrition Experts Wish You Would Stop Saying About Food

Quote:
One day, your morning cup of coffee is a great idea for your health. The next, it has too many negative health risks. Even the savviest of consumers can easily become confused amid constantly evolving research and the loud personal opinions of prominent people.

And when food marketing is thrown into the mix, the black and whites get even more gray. Packaging with words like "organic" or "natural" or "light" purposely gives us the impression it has a nutritious product to sell, when in reality there's little to formally define what those terms mean.

"There is so much nutrition misinformation out there," says Appetite for Health's Julie Upton, MS, RD, CSSD, "and add on the fact that marketers often use 'health halo' descriptors to sell products, it's no wonder Americans are confused about what's really healthy to eat."

To help clear up some of the confusion, we asked a group of nutrition experts to dish on the healthy eating concepts we're most commonly misusing. Here are eight of the worst offenders.
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2014, 01:02 PM   #2
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,289
I agree with all 8.
__________________

__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2014, 01:10 PM   #3
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,324
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
Quote:
Originally Posted by princessfiona60 View Post
i agree with all 8.
+1, 110%
__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2014, 01:21 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
Sir_Loin_of_Beef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sir Francis Drake Hotel
Posts: 4,886
I agree with all except number 7. Breakfast IS the most important meal of the day because it is the food that gets your metabolism started after your longest fasting period, unless of course you are in the habit of getting up in the middle of the night for a snack and a beverage on a regular basis. It also gives you direction for what you will be eating the rest of the day. Doughnuts for breakfast usually results in high sugar, high carb meals and snacks the rest of the day, while oatmeal or eggs normally results in balanced meals for lunch and supper and healthy snacks in between.

I enthusiastically agree with number 1 ,and every time someone tells me they can't eat something I prepared at work because they are 'cleansing' I make sure to tell them that the only thing getting cleaned out is their wallet, and I do not care whom I piss off when I tell them this. I've told this to the owners of the company where I consult as well as several of the employees, and I've told them more than once because my knowledge and expertise in matters of health, exercise and nutrition is one of the things they pay me for.
__________________
Life is much more manageable when thought of as a scavenger hunt as opposed to a surprise party - Jimmy Buffett
Sir_Loin_of_Beef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2014, 01:22 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,759
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
De-tox, as explained in the article, should be totally eliminated from dietary/health suggestions. It does belong in hospitals where it can save someone's life.

" Detoxification treatments are medical procedures that are not casually selected from a menu of alternative health treatments, or pulled off the shelf in the pharmacy. Real detoxification is provided in hospitals when there are life-threatening circumstances."

The Detox Scam: How to spot it, and how to avoid it « Science-Based Medicine

Depending on what is being 'de-toxed' the procedure is sometimes fraught with problems and certainly needs the over-sight of a doctor or medical person.

Although not mentioned the Huff. article 'supporting the Immune System' is another scam unless the person does have something as severe as AIDS.

"Be skeptical

Many products on store shelves claim to boost or support immunity. But the concept of boosting immunity actually makes little sense scientifically. In fact, boosting the number of cells in your body — immune cells or others — is not necessarily a good thing. For example, athletes who engage in “blood doping” — pumping blood into their systems to boost their number of blood cells and enhance their performance — run the risk of strokes.

Attempting to boost the cells of the immune system is especially complicated because there are so many different kinds of cells in the immune system that respond to so many different microbes in so many ways. Which cells should you boost, and to what number? So far, scientists do not know the answer. "

How to boost your immune system : Harvard Health Publications - Harvard Health Publications
__________________
cave76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2014, 01:33 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,859
Yes, clearly this article isn't talking about actual, serious disease. My poor brother's wife put him through a five-day detox cleanse of drinking ridiculously overpriced bottles of some sort of vitamin water (which is another scam; it's cheaper to buy a bottle of multivitamins and drink tap water).

Boosting immunity is also a stupid idea if the person's problem is an autoimmune disease, caused by an overactive immune system. But the writer just chose the top eight. How those were selected I don't know and I don't think it really matters to the point.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2014, 08:20 PM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Somebunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 2,649
I just shared this on Facebook, because I'm so tired of people making others feel bad for eating something that they consider "bad". Just bullying IMO.
__________________
If you don't like the food, have more wine!
Somebunny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2014, 08:43 PM   #8
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebunny View Post
I just shared this on Facebook, because I'm so tired of people making others feel bad for eating something that they consider "bad". Just bullying IMO.
I had to tell the cardiology PA to stop being a bully about the food I eat. 95% of the time I eat correctly for my multiple maladies, but some days, I just have to have fried chicken with the skin and potatoes! May not be good for my heart, but it is good for ME!
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2014, 08:50 PM   #9
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,363
To be perfectly honest, I have stopped paying any attention to the constant barrage of "good for you/bad for you" claims. I do find them interesting in an amusing way.

Remember Newton's Third Law of Motion - For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. I apply a paraphrase of that to "good for you/bad for you" claims. If some self important guy in a white lab coat announces that Food X is bad for you, there will soon be another guy claiming he was wrong and that Food X is good for you.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2014, 02:50 PM   #10
Head Chef
 
GLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Near Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,216
A pretty astute nutritionist points out that people coerced into a task do poorly on the task. And that people who harp on others to eat this, eat that, do this, do that, to eat less of that, eat more of that, are trying to coerce behavior in which the rantor appears to have no stake. She also points out that (1) the eating behavior they are trying to coerce is not a particularly fun way to eat, and (2) even if it were, the coercion renders it not fun. Naturally people do poorly, quickly abandoning the behavior or negating it by cheating.

Of course, the rantors do have an interest, but it's not a healthy interest. It becomes moral territory, and moral territory is more vigorously defended than any other kind - and with fewer scruples. It is indeed bullying, justified by the rantor as being beneficial. There's no bigger bully than someone trying to force their morality on others, unless it's one who is trying to force their morality on you to do you good, and the more they fail, the wilder-eyed their rants become.

Bully Bloomberg's attempt to limit soft drink serving sizes was doomed, even had the law not been knocked down as simply having not sufficient valid governmental interest. It bolstered his marking of his moral territory but like most such efforts, ultimately fails. People may not have good bulls**t detectors, but they have hair trigger sensitivity to perceived attacks on freedoms, and they resent others trying to mark them as being within some moral fold by p**sing on them. And they will simply drink two, instead of one serving. (No doubt supported by offers of "two for one" or free refills by the food service folks who have a better grasp of human behavior than does Bloomberg.)

Our nutritionist asserts that the only valid advice is, "Eat what you like and as much as you like." But wait. Won't people say, "Well, I like MoonPies, lots and lots of MoonPies." Sure. Some will. No doubt about it. But, you know. That guy who habitually ate lots of MoonPies before you coerced him into salads and baked chicken with the skin off will, before long, be back on the MoonPie Express. So, what's up?

If I say, "Eat things you like, and eat as much of that stuff as you like. Go ahead. It's fine with me. In fact, it's none of my business. You get to eat exactly the way you want." If you say, "By golly, I will! It IS my business, not yours, and I will indeed do as I please." What of that?

But you may well pause and ask, "Hold on. You're the nutritionist. Won't all that eating what I like and lots of it make me fat?" My answer is, "Very likely, but I'm just saying that you get to say, with no coercion from me." Will you not likely ask next, "Well, I do like this stuff? How much can I eat of it without getting real fat?" Okay. Now were off. You've taken responsibility for your own behavior and have asked from reliable information on keeping it from hurting you. Irresponsibility and dumba** are costly and about equally incurable. Always was. Always will be.

Now, this is not the advice you give children. They don't have the experience. They're by definition not responsible adults. And very young children can't even tell reality from fantasy. You have to show them that you can eat what you like AND that you can do it in such a way that it doesn't hurt you. And yes, you have to coerce them from time to time when thry try to climb on the MoonPie Express.

But adults who will eat themselves silly will, if coerced into tiny portions of uninspiring, low-fat, low carb, low salt, low taste food, also return to eating themselves silly after a while. But those who are prepared to take responsibility won't be repelled by the bullying of those who stick their big nutritionist (or pretend nutritionist) noses where they weren't invited.

Are 44-ounce Big Gasp drinks bad? Of course. We could definitely do well without them. Are triple-meat HungerLusters bad? Yeah, pretty much no one needs the things. But are the here? Is the plate going to stay 12 inches across? Sure. It's never going back to the 1950's 10 inches. So there's a challenge and a responsibility to take up, each for himself, 'cause you can't get the megaburgers, giant sodas, and supersize plates off the street. But you can't negate their effect by carping coercion. Doesn't work.
__________________

__________________
"Kitchen duty is awarded only to those of manifest excellence..." - The Master, Dogen
GLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
food

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.