"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-08-2005, 12:21 PM   #1
Executive Chef
 
amber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Maine
Posts: 4,099
A few questions

I will be making chicken tikka masala. The recipe calls for tandoori masala powder. I have no idea what that tastes like, and probably will not be able to find it in any store ( we dont have ethnic stores). Any ideas of what I can substitute?

What is a "flake" of garlic?

What are green chilies? to mean that means jalapenos.

__________________

__________________
amber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2005, 12:50 PM   #2
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by amber
I will be making chicken tikka masala. The recipe calls for tandoori masala powder. I have no idea what that tastes like, and probably will not be able to find it in any store ( we dont have ethnic stores). Any ideas of what I can substitute?

What is a "flake" of garlic?

What are green chilies? to mean that means jalapenos.
Green chiles are NOT jalapenos. They can be a lot of things... there are a lot of chilies that are green, and it is easy to just lump them all into one category. Often the commonest green chiles are anaheim chiles, I think.
__________________

__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2005, 01:07 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
Zereh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 1,548
Garlic flakes are a form of dried garlic that you should be able to find in the spice section of most grocery stores. I would think that dried "minced" could be substituted if you can't find flakes.

Green peppers could mean bell peppers, serrano, jalapeno, pablano, etc. I've never eaten the dish you're making so I'm not sure which it calls for. All of the peppers I listed except the bell will add a nice layer of heat to your dish, but I'm not sure if that's what you're looking for. Bell pepper would add more bulk but not heat.

Here's a recipe for Tandoori Masala Powder I found using Google. You probably won't find mango powder at a regular grocery store, but other than that I think these are pretty common spices.




Ingredients:
4 tsp ground coriander
3 tsp ground cummin
4 tsp garlic powder
4 tsp paprika
3 tsp ground ginger
2 tsp mango powder
1 tsp dried mint
3 tsp deep red coloring
1 tsp chilli powder
1 tsp yellow colouring)

Mix all together and store. This will keep for
months if stored in an airtight container.


Z
__________________
Zereh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2005, 02:03 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
kyles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: UK
Posts: 1,181
Send a message via MSN to kyles
Is it an English recipe? Chicken Tikka Masala was created in England by the Pakistani community. I love it, but the sauce is a bit high in fat for my new lifestyle!

Garlic flakes are pretty horrible, you can easily substitute a fresh garlic clove as well as the minced garlic. English people are scared of real garlic!!!!

You can use any curry powder instead of the tandoori one. I have never heard of mango powder, and I don't think leaving it out would hurt at all.

A green chilli is a small, green hot chilli. They use them in Thai cooking a lot. This was the other thing that made me think it might be an English recipe, we have small green chilis and small red chillis and that's about it!!!! None of these exotic varieties here!!!!

Good luck and let us know how it turns out!
__________________
kyles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2005, 02:25 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
amber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Maine
Posts: 4,099
Thanks everyone! You've been very helpful

Kyles, I posted the recipe in the chicken forum. The person who submitted this recipe is originally from London, so I think it is an indian curry. My husband is from England so I wanted to try to make him an authentic curry. I've never heard of mango powder either, but I do have all the other spices listed onhand, so maybe I'll give it a go without the mango powder.
Tonight I am trying another curry dish called Jhinga curry which calls for prawns but my husband doesnt like them so I'm using chicken instead. Thanks for the tip about garlic flakes in terms of flavor. I'd rather use fresh garlic.

Thanks again everyone, oh and if you have some favorite curry dishes please pm me or put them in the ethnic forum, that would be great.

My mistake, the chicken tikka masala does not call for prawns, but another curry I am making tonight called Jhinga curry does call for prawns but I'm using chicken.
__________________
amber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2005, 03:15 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 3,484
You can get a few different kinds of chilli powder at the grocery store.

I have seen Chili powder, hot mexican style chili powder, Ancho chili powder, Cayenne Pepper powder, and the expensive habanero chili powder.

Pick up a bottle and enjoy.
__________________
Have you had your habanero pepper today????
The hotter the pepper, the better the pepper!!!
kleenex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2005, 05:47 PM   #7
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyles
A green chilli is a small, green hot chilli. They use them in Thai cooking a lot. This was the other thing that made me think it might be an English recipe, we have small green chilis and small red chillis and that's about it!!!! None of these exotic varieties here!!!!

Good luck and let us know how it turns out!
I'd have to argue this one. Green chiles (here in the American southwest) are only very slightly hotter than bell peppers, which is why I suggested Anaheims for this. They do have a different flavor than bell peppers however, and aren't interchangeable. They tend to be about 5 - 8 inches long and maybe 1-1/2 inches in diameter. We can get them fresh in the supermarket, whole in jars and cans, chopped, dried, and at the end of summer, there are stands along the highways selling the current crop. They are almost a staple food here in the Southwestern U.S.

Recipes I have seen in the past calling for hot peppers usually are very specific about it.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2005, 05:01 AM   #8
Head Chef
 
kyles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: UK
Posts: 1,181
Send a message via MSN to kyles
Hi Rick, I think you missed my point. In England, where this recipe originated and where I live, we do not sell chillis by variety. I am originally from Australia where you would get a large variety all with individual names and different suggested uses. Here it is either small red or small green. Because this is an English recipe that Amber is using, I believe the originator of the recipe only had a limited range of chilis to hand, hence the description of small green chilli, rather than using a varietal description.
__________________
kyles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2005, 11:34 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
That makes sense kyles and good reasoning since the recipe originated where chili peppers come in 2 colors LOL At first I could only think of the green chilies in the Mexican section that come in little cans
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2005, 01:51 AM   #10
Head Chef
 
kyles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: UK
Posts: 1,181
Send a message via MSN to kyles
Another weird cross cultural thing that we come across here every now and then!!! I am not sure why England is so limited in fruit and veggies. It's like cucumber, in Australia there are 8 different cucumbers at least, in England there is whole cucumber or cut cucumber LOL!!! So using Australian recipes is a bit frustrating, and I have been known to shout at the recipe book, "No I can't use a Lebanese lady finger cucumber so there!!!!"

Asian cooking is quite difficult here, if you want to use fresh ingredients. There are plenty of suppliers of dried spices and chillis, so I often use those, but I do miss the Asian shops in Australia that sell a large variety of interesting chillis!
__________________

__________________
kyles is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.