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Old 01-22-2008, 02:41 PM   #21
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Beth, yep, still the fat thread. And yep we sure do need fat in our diet. We just don't need as much of it as most of us get, and I think we need to understand what kinds of fat we put in there. I like to learn so I hope folks keep posting what they know or have done research on.
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Old 01-22-2008, 03:05 PM   #22
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Beth, yep, still the fat thread. And yep we sure do need fat in our diet. We just don't need as much of it as most of us get, and I think we need to understand what kinds of fat we put in there. I like to learn so I hope folks keep posting what they know or have done research on.
thanks alix. I was thinking some of this dialog was in another thread, I'm easily confused.

"Edit: found this on corn oil "Refined corn oil is 99% triglyceride, with proportions of approximately 59% polyunsaturated fatty acid, 24% monounsaturated fatty acid, and 13% saturated fatty acid."


I find this interesting. I am not familiar with dietary oils being referred to as triglyceride content. Is refined corn oil the key here? I am sure what I have used is unrefined corn oil. It is nothing like the pale yellow stuff I have seen in the grocery store. But this tryglyceride thing? Dietary cholestrol does not raise blood cholestrol, but are you saying intake of dietary triglycerides raises the trig, levels in the blood? My literature has corn oil being 13% saturated, 25% monounsaturated, and 62% polyunsaturated.
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Old 01-22-2008, 03:31 PM   #23
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I wonder if we are missing the point here? I use many different oils for my cooking: canola, corn, olive, vegetable, and now I am hearing about cottonseed.
Trying to keep track of what is what, yes you do need fats, but these fats are unhealthy, etc is getting confusing. And with each oil manufacturer trying to sabotage the next, it only makes it worse.
Then there are the so-called health gurus: This causes cancer, oh wait no it doesnt, well it might. Butter is bad get margarine, oh wait thats bad too, and on and on seems like these guys can neve make up thier minds.
But, one message has stayed constant thru all this: moderation moderation moderation.
IE cooking with oils and consuming fatty foods ALL the time = bad bad bad
IE cooking sometimes with oils and sometimes fatty foods = OK, keep working on it
IE cooking with oils only when it enhances the taste and not just cause you like fried, and consuming healthy foods alot more than fatty foods = good job

JMHO
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Old 01-22-2008, 03:42 PM   #24
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Yes Maverick - it's confusing. What I think we need to remember and what it always goes back to is - balance/moderation. Whether we're talking about oils, fats, carbs, sugars, vitamin intake (even vitamins can be bad if not moderated). You want to lose weight you simply have to burn more calories than you take in. That will NEVER change!

A good healthy dose of common sense goes a long way - and it tastes really good with butter!
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Old 01-22-2008, 04:44 PM   #25
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Canola Baloney

The following article addresses many of the issues about the safety of canola oil. The Author, a professor of chemistry, has written several books addessing food myths with science. Check it out. It's worth reading.

This article is too long for one post so the second half will be in a separate post.




Canola Baloney



By Robert L. Wolke

Wednesday, February 7, 2001; Page F01

In my e-mail, I received the attached information about the dangers of canola oil. Apparently, it's making the rounds on the Internet. How much truth is there to it?

The material you forwarded to me contains some 3,000 words of claims against canola oil. Here are some of the contents of that message, along with my parenthetical comments. Judge for yourself.

"A friend who worked for only nine months as a quality-control taster at an apple-chip factory where canola oil was used exclusively for frying developed numerous health problems." (Her high school guidance counselor should never have recommended a career as quality-control taster in an apple-chip factory.) "These included loose teeth and gum disease, numb hands and feet, swollen arms and legs upon rising in the morning, extreme joint pain especially in hands, cloudy vision, constipation with stools like black marbles, hearing loss, skin tears from being bumped, lack of energy, hair loss and heart pains." (Memo to the State Department's Bureau of Arms Control: Please add canola oil to your catalogue of chemical and biological weapons.)
Such stories are mere hearsay, you might think. But how can you argue with the following first-person account, which I quote verbatim?

"My daughter and her girls were telling jokes. Stephanie hit her mom's arm with the back of a butter knife in a gesture, 'Oh, Mom,' not hard enough to hurt. My daughter's arm split open. . . . She called me to ask what could have caused it. I said, 'I'll bet anything you're using canola oil.' Sure enough, there was a big gallon jug in the pantry." (Well there's your proof, right there, Sheriff.)
Then there is The Case of the Stubborn Stigmata:

"My sister spilled canola oil on a piece of fabric. After five pre-treatings and harsh washings, the oil spot still showed. She stopped using canola oil, wondering what it did to our insides if it could not be removed from cloth easily." (That is frightening indeed, especially for those of us whose insides are lined with cloth.)
www.humbug.net
The Internet is unquestionably the greatest medium for the dissemination of information since the invention of ink and paper. Unfortunately, it is also the greatest medium for the dissemination of misinformation since the invention of the political campaign. While scandalmongering has always boosted circulation in the print media, scaremongering keeps the kilobytes flying on the Internet. Urban legends, they are called.
I quote from a column that I wrote in this space about a year ago about a widely circulated urban legend (I won't identify it for fear of giving it fuel, because it's still circulating): "Urban legends are usually recognizable by certain characteristics. They warn of dire consequences from an innocent, everyday act; they are allegedly true stories but are nevertheless anonymous and unverifiable; and they lack sufficient detail to make logical evaluation possible."
I should add that many urban-legend scare stories take flight from a grain of truth. The canola stories fit this mold, and they are encouraged by a couple of ranting books full of undocumented pseudoscientific charges.
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Old 01-22-2008, 04:44 PM   #26
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Part II of the Canola Baloney Article

Some Facts
Peanut oil comes from peanuts; olive oil comes from olives. But what on Earth is a canola?
There is no such thing as a canola. Canola oil is rapeseed oil, pressed or extracted from the seeds of the rape plant (from the Latin rapa, meaning turnip) Brassica rapa or B. campestris, close relatives of mustard, kale, cabbage and broccoli. Mustard? Yes, but there is no truth to the hysterical claim made in the e-mail rave that rapeseed is the source of mustard gas, the flesh-burning chemical weapon used by the Germans in World War I; it is chemically unrelated.
The grain of truth behind the whole anti-canola crusade is that historically, rapeseed oil has proven to be toxic because of a high content -- between 30 and 60 percent -- of erucic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid. That has never stopped people in Asia and Scandinavia, however, from using it in their cooking for centuries. But while rapeseed oil has many industrial uses, it was not permitted as an edible oil in the U.S. because of its erucic acid content.
In 1974, plant breeders at the University of Manitoba in Canada succeeded in developing a genetically modified rape plant whose seed oil contained less than 2 percent of erucic acid. They nationalistically named it canola: can- for "Canadian" plus -ola, for "oil." This euphemism was approved for edible rapeseed oil by the Food and Drug Administration in 1989, provided that the erucic acid content did not exceed 2 percent.
Today's canola oil averages 0.6 percent erucic acid, only 1 percent or 2 percent of the amount in the rapeseed oil of old. It is valued for its fatty acid profile, which is 59 percent monounsaturated, 30 percent polyunsaturated and 7 percent saturated. This compares favorably with Health Champ olive oil's profile: 74 percent monounsaturated, 8 percent polyunsaturated and 14 percent saturated.
Apparently, some people find it hard to understand that if the erucic acid has been bred out of the plant, the acid's toxicity can no longer be ascribed to the oil.
This is not the only case of a dangerous substance having to be removed from a food to make it safe. Before cashew nuts are roasted, for example, they contain a substance that would burn your skin off. And cassava, a staple of the Central and South American diet, is full of hydrogen cyanide before it is soaked or heated. Shakespeare to the contrary notwithstanding, the sins of the fathers are not to be laid upon the children.

That's Oil, Folks
Whenever there are two defensible positions in a controversy, one may expect arguments for both to turn up in an objective inquiry. In searching the Internet for information on canola, I found tons of pro-canola material from the Canola Council of Canada's prolific public relations machine, plus at least half a ton of undocumented anti-canola allegations. But significantly, I found no research studies indicating that today's low-erucic-acid canola oil, as distinguished from ordinary rapeseed oil, is harmful to humans. If credible scientific -- not anecdotal -- evidence of canola's harmfulness does exist, I would like to have it pointed out to me.

As I have said, the Internet cuts both ways; it is a medium for spreading both information and misinformation. One thing is certain: Hysterical urban legends about bizarre diseases, rotting skin and spooky stigmata are of no help to anyone who is trying to form a rational opinion. Nor are the accompanying insinuations of conspiracy, such as the one about the Canadian government's bribing the Food and Drug Administration with $50 million to declare canola oil a safe food.

My own theory is that the Canadians are deliberately poisoning the U.S. population with canola oil so they can take over the country and move down to a warmer climate. E-mail that to everyone in your address book.



Robert L. Wolke (professorscience.com) is professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh. His latest book is "What Einstein Told His Barber: More Scientific Answers to Everyday Questions" (Dell Publications, $11.95). Send your kitchen questions to wolke@pitt.edu.
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Old 01-22-2008, 04:49 PM   #27
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Some Facts
My own theory is that the Canadians are deliberately poisoning the U.S. population with canola oil so they can take over the country and move down to a warmer climate. E-mail that to everyone in your address book.


And too late, my wife is Canadian, they are already here!!!
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Old 01-22-2008, 04:50 PM   #28
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Triglyceride is the most common form of fats (solid or liquid). They consist of a 3 molecule glycerol chain with 3 fatty acids attached to it - like the letter "E" where the vertical left side is the glycerol chain and the horizontal portions are the fatty acid chains. Other forms are diglycerids (two fatty acid chains are attached to the glycerol) and monoglycerides (one fatty acid chain attached to the glycerol). Fatty acid chains that are not attached to the glycerol chain are known as free fatty acids.

When fats are heated for cooking, the fatty acid chains begin to break apart and from the glycerol backbone .. the more free fatty acids the lower the smoke/flash point and the faster the fat will go rancid.

High Density Lipoproteins (HDL - referred to good cholesterol) and Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL - referred to as bad cholesterol) are cholesterol transport systems. LDL takes cholesterol out from the liver and leaves deposits around the body - HDL picks you the debris left by the LDL and carries it back to the liver to be eliminated from the body.

Saturated fats (fatty acid chains with no double bonds) raise both the HDL and the LDL.

Monounsaturated fats (fatty acid chains with 1 double bond) raise the levels of HDL (good) cholesterol and lowers the LDL (bad) cholesterol.

Polyunsaturated fats (fatty acid chains with 2 or more double bonds) lowers the total cholesterol by lowering both the LDL and HDL the same amount (so if your total cholesterol falls by 2 points, 1 poine came from each the good and the bad).

Saturated fats are basically straight, like the letter "I" - unsaturated fats are bent at the double bonds - so they take on shapes like the letters "L" or "C". Since sat fats have a straight shape they can "zipper" together and the more of them the more likely the "fat" will be solid at room temp. Hydrogenation irons out some of the "kinks" in the unsaturated fats so they physically behave like sat fats and can form solids at room temp.

Trans Fats: These are the really bad boys! Not only does it raise the bad LDL and lowers the good HDL - it raises the bad 2 points for every 1 point it lowers the good! So, for example, if your total cholesterol goes up 2 points from trans fats ... it has gone up 4 points in the bad, and down 2 points in the good. Opposite of what we would like to have happen!

MYTH: Trans fats only come from hyrogenated oils. The truth is, it is also found naturally in the fats, milk and milk products of ruminant animals (cattle, goats, sheep, bison, water buffalo, yak, deer, antelope, etc.) and from some research articles I have found it can run as high as 1% - 4% of the total fat content. Pork, chicken, duck and goose fat may have cholesterol, but they don't have any trans fats!

I've tried to keep it simple ... so I'm sure I've left something out.
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Old 01-22-2008, 04:53 PM   #29
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Good info, Michael. Thanks.
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Old 01-22-2008, 08:26 PM   #30
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Thanks Andy and Michael, you are always my go to guys for stuff. I'm still snickering at the deliberate poisoning thing...Dang! Foiled again!
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