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Old 06-06-2006, 08:43 PM   #11
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I would eat it .... but would probably taste hours before serving it to anyone else.
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Old 06-07-2006, 10:35 AM   #12
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Look everyone, first off I am not trying to be osteperous, nor am I lookng for a fight... I just value logical thinking...

Andy- if you go back to the chart supplied by the scientists as referenced by jenny, you will see that all ten of the bacteria discussed are killed by the normal cookng process. Once they are dead- they do not produce toxins. If they produced toxins before I orignally cooked it, then why don't we all get sick all the time?

In addition, the common sources of these bacteria are poor hygiene, fecal matter etc. Once I cooked the roast I did not handle it, or expose it to anything other than the evironmental air of my house. Then under cover for the time mentioned. While I agree that the pot was not hermetically sealed, it certainly was not open to the air. The chance of enviromental contamination is remote.

If our air was that nasty then why don't we all cook under a laminar flow hood?

I have thrown it out...
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Old 06-07-2006, 07:16 PM   #13
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Let's try another website, this one is the USDA Safe Food Handling - How Temperatures Affect Food Fact Sheet. This seems to be relevant to the original question since it addresses the question:
Quote:
Originally Posted by A U.S. Department of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Hotline caller
"Last night I left cooked roast beef on the counter to cool before refrigerating, but fell asleep and discovered it this morning. I immediately put it in the refrigerator. Since the meat is cooked, shouldn't it be safe to eat?"
I can't help you with your logic - but perhaps I can offer an idea based on the science of Microbiology. Some bacteria produce spores which are not killed at the cooking temp that the bacteria are. Left to sit for a while in an ideal environment of food, moisture, oxygen and a temperature in the "danger zone" (41-140-F) - they hatch and new bacteria begin to grow and multiply. And, in time, some will produce new toxins that may have been originally killed in the initial cooking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopz
I cooked at a boiling simmer the pot roast for 6 hours
Technically, there is no such thing as a boiling simmer. At sea level (760 mmHg) the boiling point of water is 212-F. Below boiling (starting at about 160-F) is a simmer and unless you are using a pressure cooker, water will never get hotter than 212-F - although turning a pot on high will cause more water to vaproize faster (a fast boil) the temp is the same. In a slow cooker - low temp is 200-F - a simmer just below the boil. Bacteria which might need a temp above 212-F for "instant kill" can be killed by a prolonged exposure to temps below that (I used to have a link to a website with the temps and times but I can't seem to find it now).

In your situation - given the cooking and standing times, and probable potential pathogens in beef - boiling the roast for an hour, after having been cooked and sitting out for 8 hours, before eating possibly rendered it harmless. Something I "might" try for myself under certain economic conditions (probably wouldn't) - but would not want to risk serving to anyone else.
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Old 06-07-2006, 07:59 PM   #14
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I would have no qualms reheating it and eating it. However, even food refridgerated has a life expectancy, and this pot has lost some of its 9 lives. SO I would use it quickly. I don't generally leave food lying around, and had it been a mayo based salad, I would not try to resurect it. But a pot roast, fully cooked and covered, historically should be fine. In days before the fridge, (and on Amish farms and in parts of Asia and Africa) this kind of pot meal was left covered and reheated the next day, or used for a meat pie filling. Two or three days more, no sir.

However, I don't expect anyone to follow my practices who has not seen first hand what can be safely done with pre-electric methods.
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Old 06-07-2006, 08:27 PM   #15
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***Keep in mind that this post is not directly responding to anyone (I'll quote you if I am), but it is meant for anyone who is reading this thread and has doubts about the subject being adressed. Being that my profession directly deals with liabilities which can result from the mishandling of food, I just feel that this needs to be said. Admins, delete this post if you feel you need to do so.***

Some people like to play roulette with their health, and some don't. Simple as that. You do what you feel is right and if nothing happens, so be it. But to suggest to others that it is the ok thing to do is irresponsible IMO.

By saying "Well I would eat it..." implies that it's ok to do so, but don't blame me if you get sick. Whether or not one has done or will do something food related and has not suffered any ill-effects from it is irrelevant, especially if that act can or may have a high, or even relatively high probability of someone getting a food-born illness. Anyone browsing the web could find this thread, and for all we know, they could be much more susceptible to listeria or salmonella than the average person.

It's like someone asking a question like, "I just cut up raw chicken and then used the same cutting board without washing it to cut my lettuce for my Caesar salad. Is the lettuce still safe to eat?"

"Sure, I did that last week and nothing happened. I felt fine!"

Yes, the example in this thread is not to this extreme, but the general idea is there. If there's a good risk of any food-borne illness (and keep in mind that different people have different immune systems and/or tolerances to different things), the ONLY good advice is to throw it out.
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Old 06-07-2006, 08:40 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
***Keep in mind that this post is not directly responding to anyone (I'll quote you if I am), but it is meant for anyone who is reading this thread and has doubts about the subject being adressed. Being that my profession directly deals with liabilities which can result from the mishandling of food, I just feel that this needs to be said. Admins, delete this post if you feel you need to do so.***

Some people like to play roulette with their health, and some don't. Simple as that. You do what you feel is right and if nothing happens, so be it. But to suggest to others that it is the ok thing to do is irresponsible IMO.

By saying "Well I would eat it..." implies that it's ok to do so, but don't blame me if you get sick. Whether or not one has done or will do something food related and has not suffered any ill-effects from it is irrelevant, especially if that act can or may have a high, or even relatively high probability of someone getting a food-born illness. Anyone browsing the web could find this thread, and for all we know, they could be much more susceptible to listeria or salmonella than the average person.

It's like someone asking a question like, "I just cut up raw chicken and then used the same cutting board without washing it to cut my lettuce for my Caesar salad. Is the lettuce still safe to eat?"

"Sure, I did that last week and nothing happened. I felt fine!"

Yes, the example in this thread is not to this extreme, but the general idea is there. If there's a good risk of any food-borne illness (and keep in mind that different people have different immune systems and/or tolerances to different things), the ONLY good advice is to throw it out.
I completely agree with you. As I said, "when it doubt, throw it out". There is no sense in risking food born illnesses.
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Old 06-07-2006, 08:52 PM   #17
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Don't worry Ironchef - I can't think of a moderator or admin that would delete your post. Sometimes you can dodge the bullet ... but there is a reason for the food safety guidelines.
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Old 06-07-2006, 09:10 PM   #18
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It is kind of like wearing your seatbelt. You can live a full life without ever wearing it, but that does not mean it is safe or advisable.
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Old 06-08-2006, 12:13 AM   #19
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I would have eaten it, even without putting back in the crock pot. i'm sure the extra cooking in the crock pot made it even better than the first time around and killed off any bacteria that may have grown on it overnight.
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Old 06-08-2006, 12:31 AM   #20
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i would say it facts and figures are a fine thing, something to be heeded, but you should know yourself, and who else may eat it.
i believe that i was raised a little less delicately than many people, eating lots of raw meats, fishes, and eggs, so i've found i have a fairly high tolerance to "iffy" foods. the worst i get is a little aggida, or gas.
is that a good thing? well, i'd think so. it shows that my immune and digestive systems are in good health, running on all cylinders.

if you are the same kind of person, then by all means just add a little moisture and reheat the sucker.
if you find you have a less than robust gut, chuck it.

shouldn't everyone be taking their daily antibiotics by now?
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