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Old 06-04-2006, 10:21 AM   #1
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Question A question of safety

I made a Pot Roast on Friday... it was great. Because it was still hot I left it out to cool before putting it in the fridge.

Woke up Saturday to find it still cooling on the stove top. Forgot to put it away.

For us, the leftover pot roast is almost better than the first serving. We like to make various dishes from the shredded beef.

So, I put the crock pot vessel back into the cooker and ran it for another 2 hours... hopefully killing any "nasties" thet grew over Friday night.

Question.... do you think it safe to eat? Would YOU eat it?

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Old 06-04-2006, 10:42 AM   #2
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Hmmm. If I had been you, I would have just popped it into the fridge as soon as I found it Saturday morning. Wouldn't have bothered sticking it back into the crockpot to cook at low temps for 2 more hours. I don't have anything scientific to go by, but I would think recooking it at low temps would just make any possible nasties even nastier.

I have left things like this out overnight accidentally & have never become ill from eating them - but I would also not serve them to the very young, very old, or anyone immune system-compromised.
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Old 06-04-2006, 10:49 AM   #3
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B.C. I should clarify... I cooked it again on HIGH-- actually it was boiling for and hour or so...
In my homebrewing experience... boiling for 20 minutes will kill anything nasty... or so I have been led to believe...
The question remains.
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Old 06-04-2006, 03:09 PM   #4
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When in doubt, throw it out. No sense in risking food poisoning. I wouldn't eat it.
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Old 06-05-2006, 12:54 PM   #5
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Throw it out. If heat were magically able to sanitize tainted food we wouldn't have refigerators. Bacteria is usually killed by heat, but once the bacteria has formed, as it surely did on your meat, it begins to produce toxins not all of which are killed off by heat.

Here is some information from the good folks at the Texas Agricultural Extension Service that should hopefully make you think twice about eating that pot roast. Sorry.
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Old 06-05-2006, 01:10 PM   #6
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Thanks for the tip, and the reference to the web site.

Curious to note that of the ten "nasties" (technical term...) only one, Listeria monocytogenes, seemed resistant to cooking temperatures.... all the rest were killed off.

I will throw it out, but I ate it anyway yesterday- so far no symptoms....
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Old 06-05-2006, 01:27 PM   #7
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But if you look at the chart, many of the types of bacteria listed produce toxins that are not killed by heat. So while the meat was sitting at room temperature the bacteria was spewing even more dangerous nasties just for you! Even if you recook the meat and destroy the bacteria the toxins that can make you sick are still there.
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Old 06-06-2006, 11:28 AM   #8
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jenny... I do appreciate your inputs, but look at my logic too.

I cooked at a boiling simmer the pot roast for 6 hours... that would have killed all ten of the listed bacteria. They would not be able to produce toxins.

Then it sat covered for about 8 hours.... previous bacteria dead... no new bacteria allowed to enter the mix... then boiled again for an hour... nothing alive in there to make toxins.

where am I missing the boat here?
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Old 06-06-2006, 12:10 PM   #9
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Whoa Nelly!!!

First off, do keep in mind that I was one of the posters who would have eaten the pot roast, no problem.

However, that said - your comment that it "sat covered for about 8 hours, previous bacteria dead, no new bacteria allowed to enter" is, unfortunately, completely untrue.

Unless the pot roast was hermetically sealed in a vacuum bag, it just being "covered" means less than nothing as far as barring bacteria from entering. Exactly how large do you think bacteria are - lol!!!!!!!
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Old 06-06-2006, 01:05 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopz
jenny... I do appreciate your inputs, but look at my logic too.

I cooked at a boiling simmer the pot roast for 6 hours... that would have killed all ten of the listed bacteria. They would not be able to produce toxins.

Then it sat covered for about 8 hours.... previous bacteria dead... no new bacteria allowed to enter the mix... then boiled again for an hour... nothing alive in there to make toxins.

where am I missing the boat here?

The bacteria create the toxins, then you kill the bacteria. The toxins remain. The fact that no new bacteria were added to the pot (wrong! breezy cooking is right) is immaterial.

You were lucky this time.
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