"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-05-2007, 11:54 PM   #1
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Bloomington, IN
Posts: 1,129
Send a message via AIM to college_cook
A spoonful of... coffee?

How about this instead of your morning cup?

These "caviar" are simply coffee encapsulated in a thin gel layer. Here's the kicker; the gel is also coffee. By using a few grams of sodium alginate and calcium chloride, you can encapsulate a liquid in itself, giving it a little bit of texture. When you bite in, the liquid flows into your mouth; it's really quite unlike anything I've ever experienced.

Once I get comfortable with this technique and the proper ratios to use, I'll start posting some recipes for anyone interested.

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN1575.JPG
Views:	132
Size:	199.0 KB
ID:	2990   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN1577.JPG
Views:	132
Size:	142.0 KB
ID:	2991  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN1578.JPG
Views:	133
Size:	100.7 KB
ID:	2992  
__________________

__________________
college_cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2007, 12:38 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 3,619
Did you make those spoonfuls of coffee, college cook? Please, please share the how to's. That looks like the coolest thing! Makes me wonder about the possibilities....
Terry
__________________

__________________
Fisher's Mom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2007, 02:01 AM   #3
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Fisher's Mom, basically, you take a liquid (in this case coffee, but you can use things like carrot juice, beet juice, apple juice, tomato soup, etc.) and blend it with sodium alginate. This liquid is then dispensed into a solution of calcium chloride and water (I usually use 2.5 g CC for every 500 g water). There is a chemical reaction with the sodium alginate that causes it to "gel" or "calcify" in the presence of calcium chloride. You can use a syringe to make the "caviar", but most people that I know use a caviar maker. It makes things much easier since you can do it in bulk.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2007, 09:23 AM   #4
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,324
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
you mad scientists! lol.

I want to know how Fernand Adria does his "Air". While I was in Englad for hte past 2 weeks, I watch Heston Bleumenthal doing some really remarkable things as well.

FAT DUCK
__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2007, 09:38 AM   #5
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Bloomington, IN
Posts: 1,129
Send a message via AIM to college_cook
Ironchef- have you found that the alginate thickens the flavorful liquid too much? I was happy with the end flavor, and that I got the effect to work correctly, but when breaking a larger-sized sphere last night the inside was very thick and viscous, almost like an egg yolk. I am just wondering if it's possible to cut the amount of alginate and still recieve the desired effect. I believe I used 2 g of Calcium chloride per 500 mL water, and 1g alginate for 250 mL coffee.
__________________
college_cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2007, 02:02 PM   #6
Head Chef
 
GrillingFool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: usa
Posts: 2,223
Very cool! Fascinating stuff!
__________________
GrillingFool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2007, 02:41 PM   #7
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by college_cook View Post
Ironchef- have you found that the alginate thickens the flavorful liquid too much? I was happy with the end flavor, and that I got the effect to work correctly, but when breaking a larger-sized sphere last night the inside was very thick and viscous, almost like an egg yolk. I am just wondering if it's possible to cut the amount of alginate and still recieve the desired effect. I believe I used 2 g of Calcium chloride per 500 mL water, and 1g alginate for 250 mL coffee.
You can try increasing the CC in the solution by a little bit while decreasing the alginate in the caviar. The liquid in the sphere will become thicker though. It's just a property of the sodium alginate because it's a food thickener.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2007, 03:26 PM   #8
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 3,619
Thanks for the link, IC. I'm going to order the caviar maker and the supplies. I think this will be a cool science thing for my kids. Just to clarify, this is how they make bubble tea, right? I don't care for it myself but it looks like a fun thing to do. Are there any other "applications" for this caviar?
__________________
Fisher's Mom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2007, 03:45 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
Thanks for the link, IC. I'm going to order the caviar maker and the supplies. I think this will be a cool science thing for my kids. Just to clarify, this is how they make bubble tea, right? I don't care for it myself but it looks like a fun thing to do. Are there any other "applications" for this caviar?
No, bubble tea uses large tapioca balls.

You can make larger sized spheres. My friend made an egg yolk sized sphere which was filled with a pea puree and used it for a "green eggs and ham" special.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2007, 03:53 PM   #10
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 3,619
IC, what would one do with this "caviar"? Is it just for fun like your friend's Seuss special (good enough for me) or are there actual meals people serve this with? You mentioned other liquids could be used. Would this be like a garnish? Would they ever be dissolved in hot liquid?
Your ignorant pal,
Terry (lol)
__________________

__________________
Fisher's Mom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.