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Old 12-22-2014, 06:41 AM   #1
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Aged beef vs unaged beef

Hi there,

I'm a first time poster!

I went to smithfield meat market this morning and bought a 2.5kg beef fillet (tenderloin). I have just realised that it's not been hung, it was slaughted on 16th, packed on 18th and I bought it on 22nd.

Considering it's not been hung, is this going to cause problems for my beef wellington over xmas day?

I know hung meat intensifys flavours, removes moisture and tendorizes the meat.... ARGHHH!!! Help!!!!!!!

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Old 12-22-2014, 10:02 AM   #2
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Welcome to DC! Your beef should be fine.
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Old 12-22-2014, 10:35 AM   #3
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Tenderness is not a problem with tenderloin (thus the name). I think you'll still be fine with your Wellington.
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Old 12-22-2014, 10:44 AM   #4
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I agree with others that tenderness is not a concern. The only thing that might be an issue is that it may contain more water than an aged cut, and in turn that may cause the pastry portion of your Beef Wellington to become soggy.

Keep in mind, however, Christmas is still a few days away, and you can "dry age" it for a few days in your fridge. I've used the method described in the linked article below many times and it works well for eliminating excess moisture in your meat. In fact, I have a rib roast myself in the fridge undergoing the same treatment.

Dry-Aging Beef Pays Off With Big Flavor
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Old 12-22-2014, 07:20 PM   #5
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Nice link Steve. TY.

Kind of shows that meats today have more moisture then in the past and that effects flavor.

Also shows that our foodstuffs can withstand some time sitting as opposed to having to be consumed immediately without ill effects resulting. Heck it might even enhance the flavor.
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Old 12-23-2014, 12:41 PM   #6
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Welcome to DC! I am in Ontario. Our provincial law only allows beef to be hung 14 days (it used to be 21 days). I bought a side of a 6-month old bull calf late August. It was hung for 16 days (timing is everything re: inspectors and returning phone calls to the abattoir). The meat is excellent. It was a grass-fed calf. I used the tenderloin for steak tartare.


I bought a grass-fed lamb in September. It was slaughtered on the Monday and ready for pick up on the Thursday. This was done at a halal (sp) abattoir--different practices. I picked up the lamb fresh and let some of it dry age in the fridge.


The meat that used to be hung 21-days did have more flavor and was more tender, IMO. The steers were usually around 18 months old.
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Old 12-24-2014, 12:02 PM   #7
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I even dry my turkey in the fridge like one would dry a duck. Much crispier skin and seems to taste and have better texture.
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