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Old 06-07-2006, 08:07 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Robo410
I also wish one could buy smaller quantities of oils because I don't use much other than olive oil, however, every now and then the cannola or peanut comes in handy.
What is available depends on your grocery store. Although you will pay more for small amounts ($/oz) because of packaging costs and sometimes it's cheaper to go ahead and get the next larger size .... I can generally find 12 oz bottles of just about any kind of oil.
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Old 06-07-2006, 10:23 PM   #12
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What is available depends on your grocery store. Although you will pay more for small amounts ($/oz) because of packaging costs and sometimes it's cheaper to go ahead and get the next larger size .... I can generally find 12 oz bottles of just about any kind of oil.
I do not know about elsewhere, but here in Australia it is generally cheaper to buy peanut oil (or other Asian groceries, of course) from Asian supermarkets and stores rather than the big chain supermarkets. Might help.
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Old 06-08-2006, 03:22 PM   #13
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Peanut oil called for in asian dishes is usually the stronger-flavored oil manufactured in asia.

American peanut oil is more neutral.

Many American asian restaurant use canola oil or a combo of peanut and canola oil.
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Old 06-08-2006, 05:18 PM   #14
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Thanks for the suggestions (and yes I'm pretty sure I could figure out what to do with that oil from the peanut butter Caine ). My goal was to keep it as close to the original flavor as possible, hence why I didn't simply want to swap oils unless the difference would be negligable.

As for the black beans, the recipe actually calls for canned black beans that have been rinsed and chopped, so that wouldn't be hard to deal with anything left over could be just putinto a pot of chilli, and I happen to rather enjoy chilli (who doesn't?).


Sadly, I've lately found that the more unlikely I am to use an ingredient, the bigger the amount I have to buy (like peanut oil in gallon sized containers).

But again, thanks!
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Old 06-08-2006, 05:29 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Blue Phoenix
As for the black beans, the recipe actually calls for canned black beans that have been rinsed and chopped, so that wouldn't be hard to deal with anything left over could be just put into a pot of chilli, and I happen to rather enjoy chilli (who doesn't?).


Sadly, I've lately found that the more unlikely I am to use an ingredient, the bigger the amount I have to buy (like peanut oil in gallon sized containers).

But again, thanks!


Those are NOT the black beans called for in an asian recipe. If you are looking for authentic taste they won't be anything remotely close.

Look for black beans in an asian market. They are fermented soy beans and will come in a glass jar usually. Very salty and usually pungent.

And, in any asian store you should be able to buy a quart of peanut oil or peanut/canola oil with no problem. Look for "Lion and and Globe" brand.
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Old 06-08-2006, 08:28 PM   #16
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Look for black beans in an asian market. They are fermented soy beans and will come in a glass jar usually. Very salty and usually pungent.
Can also be sold in vacuum-packed (or regular) plastic bags. Make sure you rinse them first before using.
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