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Old 10-08-2007, 11:01 AM   #11
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Nope... not to old at all.
Go for the dream!
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Old 10-08-2007, 11:33 AM   #12
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You're never too old to learn anything. If this is what you want, go for it. This is a very tough industry. My son in law was a chef for years, had to give it up now due to back problems. But I can tell you this - it's a 7 day a week 14 to 16 hour day type of job. You will work under very hard conditons, the heat in a kitchen can exceed 120 degrees. He worked very hard and for the first 7 or 8 years he made just over minimum wage. The pay is low and few chefs are able to handle the pressure. If you know and accept this then work hard and be what you want to be. Just do your research. Try to get a job in a kitchen so you can see what the industry is about. And the best of luck to you.
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Old 10-08-2007, 11:45 AM   #13
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You're never too old to learn anything. If this is what you want, go for it. This is a very tough industry. My son in law was a chef for years, had to give it up now due to back problems. But I can tell you this - it's a 7 day a week 14 to 16 hour day type of job. You will work under very hard conditons, the heat in a kitchen can exceed 120 degrees. He worked very hard and for the first 7 or 8 years he made just over minimum wage. The pay is low and few chefs are able to handle the pressure. If you know and accept this then work hard and be what you want to be. Just do your research. Try to get a job in a kitchen so you can see what the industry is about. And the best of luck to you.
Wow...so this is what you get from getting a culinary degree? What's the motivation to do it then?
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Old 10-08-2007, 11:50 AM   #14
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hi all

just spoke to my dad yesterday that i want to take cooking seriously and go to cooking school/college. At the moment i am casual cooking fanatic but i am in university doing music production and i wont graduate until i am 22 (2009). After telling my dad this he said that it is too late for me to learn to cook profesionally and after when he said that to me i felt like he was right in someway and my dreams has kinda shattered.

Any advice?

Cheers

Aaron
It is definitely NOT too late. However, before you invest even one dollar in culinary school, you need to get a job working in a professional kitchen. Likely it will NOT be a cooking job, but a dish dog.

You need to get a feel for what the professional kitchen is really like before you make that big move (and investment). The professional kitchen is to the home kitchen as quinces are to apples.....

and good luck!
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Old 10-08-2007, 12:05 PM   #15
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Wow...so this is what you get from getting a culinary degree? What's the motivation to do it then?
If you have to ask that question, then you are definitely not motivated. You do it because you love cooking, or because you want to excel in the industry or because you want to be creative with food. IF you're doing it for the money, or the easy job idea, forget it. As I said, you need to get a job in the industry to see firsthand what it's all about. If you can't take the heat stay out of the kitchen. Cuz you're going to take a lot of heat. The head chef will give you all the heat you can take. They are temperametal, and will scream at you if you screw up or don't work fast enough. This is their job, to see that the kitchen runs as smoothly as possible. Do yourself a favor and take a good hard look at what you're getting into. This is a great way to be creative, but you're going to work very, very hard and long.
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Old 10-08-2007, 12:41 PM   #16
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I suggest you make an appointment to sit down and have a nice, long, heart-to-heart with your career planning and placement counselor.
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Old 10-08-2007, 01:30 PM   #17
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DQ has said it in a very truthful, maybe painful way... but that's what it is.

There is nothing, ABSOLUTELY NOTHING glamorous about being a chef. It may look that way when you see folks performing on TV, but the reality of the job is long, long hours on your feet, lots of heavy lifting, in a very hot kitchen. If you don't have the passion, you will never make it.Those who are successful are so because they are compelled to cook.
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Old 10-08-2007, 01:40 PM   #18
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Do you have any experience working in a restaurant? If not, I suggest trying to get some entry level job just so you can get exposed to what goes on before persuing a degree in the field.
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Old 10-08-2007, 02:40 PM   #19
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Wow...so this is what you get from getting a culinary degree? What's the motivation to do it then?
I would assume it is the same motivation that drives most people to follow a career path for which they feel a calling. For instance, who on earth would ever become a teacher, if not called to it? Dealing with parents who all think their little angels are perfect and could never do wrong, dealing with ever-changing principals (I had 8 in 10 years) who each have a different idea of how to run the school, dealing with kids who ask things like, "Is Magellan still dead?" and truly mean it, dealing with sagging pants, children cussing, and trying to bring a class full of 4th graders (several of whom can't read) up to grade-level by the end of the year--who would take something like that on? Who would take on a culinary career? People are attracted to various careers for many reasons. We don't choose a career path because of the difficult parts, but in spite of them, and we try hard to be the best at it because it isn't always bad or difficult, and the rewards seem even sweeter then. Without mountains, a valley is just flat land.

Barbara
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Old 10-08-2007, 03:09 PM   #20
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sounds good, and Verablue, I don't think your daughter has wasted anything of her two years...all that will come to good use...either in the kitchen or front of house, as personnel or customer relations, you name it. And if she goes for a BPS in culinary or baking, some core courses may be transferable.
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