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Old 02-19-2014, 01:03 AM   #91
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Indian Pudding is a New England dish. Nasty stuff made with molasses, corn meal and raisins. A Julia Child favorite dish. They serve it at one of the restaurants , Durgin's Park at Fanuiel Hall. A tourist trap in Boston.
Some of us like it Addie. Properly done, it can be very flavorful and the texture is right. Haven't eaten at Durgin Park since the 1970s, so maybe they do a shortcut version from their original, not that I remember what it was like. But there is a restaurant in West Brookfield that had an amazing Indian Pudding. Haven't been there recently, but when we went soon after we moved here it was every bit as yummy as when we first discovered the restaurant back in the 1970s when we went camping in Sturbridge. Now we live near there! Hmm, might have to plan the budget for a trip out to Salem Cross sometime this summer.
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Old 02-19-2014, 01:58 AM   #92
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American Chop Suey?

Never heard of American Chop Suey, until I read about it here, but I remembered goulash from my youth. I was visiting my mom yesterday and remembered to ask her about it, she was a little confused about what was in it, but it defiantly contained elbow macaroni and some kind of tomato. Either sauce, or stewed or soup. She seemed to think other things left over from the fridge might have gone in to it) They called it goulash or slumgullion (they are pretty much interchangeable in her book) what could be confusing her is that her "spaghetti" was made with pretty much the same ingredients with the addition of ground beef. Lol!
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Old 02-19-2014, 02:43 AM   #93
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Slumgullion! AKA "Slop" in our house. That's a word I haven't heard in ages. What my Mom made by that name was fried ground meat, plus some red "sauce", discs of carrots, and pre-cooked wide noodles. Combine in a big fry pan, cover, and cook until the carrots are tender. Mom probably used tomato soup, which Himself doesn't really like, so I think I'll try it with tomato sauce.
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Old 02-19-2014, 04:01 AM   #94
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American Chop Suey?

Ha! That's the one CG! Mom said grandma probably used tomato soup too, but mom usually used tomatoes or sauce. I guess most of our generation probably ate a lot of the same fare.except maybe those with strong ethnic backgrounds. (I'm a Heinz 57)lol!
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Old 02-19-2014, 06:47 AM   #95
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Some of us like it Addie. Properly done, it can be very flavorful and the texture is right. Haven't eaten at Durgin Park since the 1970s, so maybe they do a shortcut version from their original, not that I remember what it was like. But there is a restaurant in West Brookfield that had an amazing Indian Pudding. Haven't been there recently, but when we went soon after we moved here it was every bit as yummy as when we first discovered the restaurant back in the 1970s when we went camping in Sturbridge. Now we live near there! Hmm, might have to plan the budget for a trip out to Salem Cross sometime this summer.
To each there own.
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Old 02-19-2014, 09:30 AM   #96
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I had forgotten slumgullion was another name for this dish or a version of it. Amazing it took until the 92nd post for it to come up.
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Old 02-19-2014, 09:34 AM   #97
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I had forgotten slumgullion was another name for this dish or a version of it. Amazing it took until the 92nd post for it to come up.
My Czech Grandmother was the only one to call it that, as kids we kept telling her it was Goulash.
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Old 02-19-2014, 10:33 AM   #98
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Ha! That's the one CG! Mom said grandma probably used tomato soup too, but mom usually used tomatoes or sauce. I guess most of our generation probably ate a lot of the same fare.except maybe those with strong ethnic backgrounds. (I'm a Heinz 57)lol!
That explains it. I never had anything like that except at camp. My parents were fairly FOB from Scandinavia when I was born. I got pyttipanna and biksemad.
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Old 02-19-2014, 01:16 PM   #99
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Slummuligan! Oh, my! That is a great name for the American Chop Suey. I think it's a good name.

Don't get me wrong, I lke it (ACS), I just hate that it seems to malign real chop suey which I like and that I think deserves to keep it's own name.
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Old 02-19-2014, 03:23 PM   #100
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Slummuligan! Oh, my! That is a great name for the American Chop Suey. I think it's a good name.

Don't get me wrong, I lke it (ACS), I just hate that it seems to malign real chop suey which I like and that I think deserves to keep it's own name.
But ACS is within the spirit fo the original dish. It means quite simply - leftovers. American Chop suey, slumgullian, Chop suey, all represent the same thing, even if the actual dishes are different.

To me, only goulash and gulyas are something completely different. The dish that we Americans regulary call goulash, doesn't even remotely resemble, in fact, or spirit, the European stew from which the name originated.

And don't even get me started on things like bruschetta. In the U.S., we have such a wide range of ethnicities that live here, each bringing unique flavors to our culinary salad, that original names and recipes get lost in the fusion. I'm all about people giving up ethnic traditions that create tensions. But I think that the great parts of each should be cherished, and preserved so that they can be shared with all.

Whoa! Slow down the horses. I'm straying off course here. It must be time for me to shut my mouth, or put mittens on my typing fingers.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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