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Old 02-15-2014, 07:57 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
The LaChoy stuff was exactly what my Mom called American Chop Suey. While most of us ate it over the hard-as-rocks canned chow mein noodles, Dad would have his over mashed potatoes. Talk about a meal with no texture.

In my part of the country macaroni and ground meat was known as Johnny Marzetti. Similar to the New England ACS, but fewer ingredients. Johnny Marzetti was created by an Italian immigrant in 1896. She and her husband opened a restaurant in Columbus and wanted to serve food that was both plentiful and cheap...after all, there was a university just down the street and it was full of hungry students!
CG, thanks for clearing that up for me with that link. I'd never heard of "Johnny Marzetti" before PF mentioned it the other day.Now it makes sense.
Kids had to bring their own sack lunch where I went to school, so no cafeteria American Chop Suey in my memory either. As I've mentioned before, I was raised in a grocery/meat market and my mom wasn't a fan of ground beef. I made lots of dishes with ground beef when my kids were growing up, but I don't remember naming them anything.
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Old 02-15-2014, 08:27 PM   #32
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powerplantop, try this recipe. It's approved by my daughter.


American Chop Suey


1 Lb Ground Beef
1 Ea Onion
1 Ea Green Pepper
2 Cl Garlic
3 Tb Tomato Paste
28 Oz Canned Tomato
½ Lb Elbow Macaroni

Brown the beef in a sauté pan over medium high heat. Remove it from the pan. Pour off all but two tablespoons of fat.

Sauté the onion, pepper and garlic in the remaining fat until softened.

Add the paste and sauté for an additional 3 minutes.

Add the tomato and the meat to the sautéed vegetables. Simmer for 15-20 minutes.

Prepare the pasta according to package directions.

When the pasta is cooked, drain off the water and mix the pasta with the vegetable and meat mixture. Cook together for 2-3 minutes to allow the flavor of the sauce to cook into the pasta.

Serve with grated cheese.
That is what my Grandma call Goulash. This is the first time I have heard it called American Chop Suey
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:09 PM   #33
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That is what my Grandma call Goulash. This is the first time I have heard it called American Chop Suey

Same dish, regionally different names. Goulash in some places (often the south) and ACS in other places.
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:13 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post

Same dish, regionally different names. Goulash in some places (often the south) and ACS in other places.
In North Dakota, this was goulash. Or hot dish.
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:24 PM   #35
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How many of you guys make this dish? Am I the only budding cafeteria lady here?
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:47 PM   #36
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I always thought America chop suey was a casserole with hamburger, cream of celery soup and rice. With soy sauce to make it authentic.

At our house it was Goulash. I still make it when we need comfort food. Ours is burger, onions, peppers, corn, tomatoes, oregano, worcestershire sauce and some water with macaroni cooked right in the sauce and topped w/ cheddar cheese.

I remember Chung King Chow Mein. Mom tried to pass it off as a special treat. Probably because it had two cans, lol.
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:48 PM   #37
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Apparently, Andy. I asked DH, who's originally from PA, if he'd heard of ACS. Nope. Then when I described Andy's recipe, he said, "That's goulash."

I don't like elbow macaroni. Otherwise I'd probably make a good cafeteria lady too.

And Bookbrat, we had Chung King with the two cans too! Very exotic!
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:54 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
The LaChoy stuff was exactly what my Mom called American Chop Suey. While most of us ate it over the hard-as-rocks canned chow mein noodles, Dad would have his over mashed potatoes. Talk about a meal with no texture.

In my part of the country macaroni and ground meat was known as Johnny Marzetti. Similar to the New England ACS, but fewer ingredients. Johnny Marzetti was created by an Italian immigrant in 1896. She and her husband opened a restaurant in Columbus and wanted to serve food that was both plentiful and cheap...after all, there was a university just down the street and it was full of hungry students!
Thanks for that, I got my Johnny Marzetti recipe from the Best Lunch Lady in the world. She was one of my cooking inspirations.
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Old 02-15-2014, 10:01 PM   #39
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Me, too. My mom would make a pork roast one night and chop suey the next with leftover cubed pork, a can of LaChoy chop suey vegetables, and a sauce of the can liquid, soy sauce and cornstarch, served over rice. Sometimes we had the chow mein noodles on top.

That was our Chop Suey, too. The tomato-meat-pasta dish was goulash.

Hungarian Goulash was the paprika dish...
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Old 02-15-2014, 10:11 PM   #40
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Apparently, Andy. I asked DH, who's originally from PA, if he'd heard of ACS. Nope. Then when I described Andy's recipe, he said, "That's goulash."

I don't like elbow macaroni. Otherwise I'd probably make a good cafeteria lady too.

And Bookbrat, we had Chung King with the two cans too! Very exotic!

Maybe ACS is just a New England thing...
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