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Old 04-19-2011, 11:12 PM   #1
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Any experts on toasting bread?

Hi, I love toasted bread that maintains that crunchy texture on the surface... but from my experience, it's just not that simple...

It would be great if Alton Brown had an episode on the science of toasting bread - superior method (oven, fry pan, toaster oven, toaster, etc) and superior bread (white, whole grain, wheat, rye, etc).

From my experience, I noticed that the more natural the bread, the better the crunchy texture. For example, rye bread maintains that crunchiness for the duration of the meal.

On the other hand, my favorite brand name loaf of bread is "Home Pride" white bread (butter top). Not sure why it's called "butter top," 'cause I don't taste any butter... but I love it because it's always soft and it's lovely for PB&J sandwiches.

That said, Home Pride does not hold up to toasting. The crunchy texture lasts about a minute or two, and then the bread becomes stale and tenacious... don't know what that's about. I guess white bread has been altered too much, and it just doesn't have enough of that natural goodness to maintain the crunchiness like rye bread.

However, I also buy the loaf of artisan french bread that are directly made by the bakery of the supermarkets. Even though it's white bread, the toast holds up very well. The downfall however, is that the individual slices of bread simply aren't large enough for sandwich purposes... they're more intended for dipping in soup, or spreading butter on 'em, etc. But individually, they're very small. It would work if the market could slice the loaf of bread on a bias, but they said the machine doesn't work like that...

So is there a really good secret to toasting brand name white bread? Or is it pretty much impossible, due to all the processing?

Thanks as always!

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Old 04-19-2011, 11:26 PM   #2
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What are you using to toast? Toaster or toaster oven?

I use a toaster oven and find that if I leave toast in the oven after the cycle shuts off the oven, the bread drys out and becomes brittle. A a result, I take the toast out right away at the end of the cycle and set it out to cool.
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Old 04-19-2011, 11:32 PM   #3
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and set it out to cool.
Oh, I could never do that!

I have to get my margarine on immediately so it melts properly into the toast!
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Old 04-20-2011, 12:00 AM   #4
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Oh, I could never do that!

I have to get my margarine on immediately so it melts properly into the toast!

Of course! But, if you make toast with fresh bread, there is residual moisture in the bread. If you lay the slices of bread flat on a plate when they are hot out of the toaster, moisture will collect under the toast making it soggy.
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Old 04-20-2011, 12:10 AM   #5
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Of course! But, if you make toast with fresh bread, there is residual moisture in the bread. If you lay the slices of bread flat on a plate when they are hot out of the toaster, moisture will collect under the toast making it soggy.
What plate?
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Old 04-20-2011, 12:25 AM   #6
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Of course! But, if you make toast with fresh bread, there is residual moisture in the bread. If you lay the slices of bread flat on a plate when they are hot out of the toaster, moisture will collect under the toast making it soggy.
I have been making toast all my life and the only times it has ever been soggy is when I have taken it out of the freezer with ice crystals on it and have toasted it before thawing the bread. Maybe condensation on toast is an American thing
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Old 04-20-2011, 12:25 AM   #7
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What plate?
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Old 04-20-2011, 12:26 AM   #8
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I have been making toast all my life and the only times it has ever been soggy is when I have taken it out of the freezer with ice crystals on it and have toasted it before thawing the bread. Maybe condensation on toast is an American thing
Possibly that self-clean cycle on the toaster...
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Old 04-20-2011, 12:35 AM   #9
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You get out what you put in. Supermarket white bread is pretty much air and water, those two items are kind of hard to toast.
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Old 04-20-2011, 01:07 AM   #10
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Quote:
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Of course! But, if you make toast with fresh bread, there is residual moisture in the bread. If you lay the slices of bread flat on a plate when they are hot out of the toaster, moisture will collect under the toast making it soggy.
I leave my bread in the toaster a little while after it's done just to avoid "toast sweat".
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