"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-28-2008, 04:01 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Nazaré, Portugal
Posts: 120
Any tips for using roasting bags?

I tried roasting bags for the first time a couple of days ago and again today and didn't like the results.

Two days ago I put chicken thighs and legs plus par boiled potatoes into a bag after oiling then with a brush. I cooked them on Gas mark 4 (350) for 45 minutes and everything came out as if I steamed and not roasted.

Today I tried just the potatoes (oiled) but raised the temperature to Gas mark 6 (400) and left them without par boiling for 45 minutes.

The bag melted slightly where it was touching the metal pan and now I can't clean the pan properly.

And the potatoes weren't brown.

Any suggestions would be appreciated,

Mike

__________________

__________________
redmike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2008, 04:13 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,346
Your experiences are why I don't use roasting bags. They are, in effect, another way to braise, not roast. Roasting, is a dry heat cooking method and that is what gives you the browning for meats and potatoes.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2008, 06:31 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
I'm with Andy M. - they should really be called "braising" bags - since the idea is to trap in moisture during cooking.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2008, 07:33 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
MexicoKaren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bucerias, Nayarit, Mexico
Posts: 1,914
I gave up on them years ago as well. It seems to me that I feel more rewarded and healthy if I stick to basic cooking techniques without the expensive accessories like roasting bags, special teflon-coated foil, prepackaged seasonings, etc. I can't help but think that some of the plastic from the bags ends up in our food, for example. Good, fresh food, no mixes, no chemicals. That's just me.
__________________
Saludos, Karen
MexicoKaren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 08:50 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Mooresville, NC
Posts: 3,102
I only use the roasting bags for the turkey and baking clay. Yes, clay. You use the roasting bag to contain the smell of the clay, so that should tell you something.

While they are good and convenient for keeping my turkey moist once a year, they aren't practical for every day use, and I seem to end up with an extra bag and needing to buy a new box every year because I can never find the ties when the next year comes around.

Again, great for clay and your turkey once a year, but not for everyday use.
__________________
Callisto in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 09:02 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pdswife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Washington
Posts: 20,308
Send a message via AIM to pdswife Send a message via MSN to pdswife Send a message via Yahoo to pdswife
I haven't used one in a few years but... I had some beef roasts and veggies turn out really well. Moist and tender and delish.
__________________
In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes on. Robert Frost
pdswife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 10:30 AM   #7
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Nazaré, Portugal
Posts: 120
thanks for the replies - seems doubtful there are any buyers

I ended up having to throw the pan away as I couldn't get the melted plastic off of it.

Mike
__________________
redmike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 10:37 AM   #8
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Mooresville, NC
Posts: 3,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by redmike View Post
I ended up having to throw the pan away as I couldn't get the melted plastic off of it.

Mike
Interesting...I've never had the bag melt. I put a metal pan inside the bag and never had any problems. This is why I do clay. And when I do turkey it touches the sides of the pan. What brand are you using? The Reynolds bags aren't plastic.
__________________
Callisto in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 07:01 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Not all bags can be used at high temps. Depends on the bags. They should have instructions on the package telling you what temps you can use. I've never had a problem with a "roasting bag" melt - but I always followed the instructions.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 09:35 AM   #10
Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: In the Land Down Under
Posts: 69
Mmm...Yes...Interesting thread!

I can see this becomming one of those ever lasting threads.

Here in Gods country, OOrrstraylearemate, we call them oven bags, not roasting bags.

Funny though, we here in Australia also call some female humans 'bags'...In a friendly way of course!! And some we don't want to be friendly with should be roasted

How about chicken (whole) from frozen to served in 35 minutes?...I kid you not!

One oven bag is needed. Do NOT use the wire thingy OK? Put chicken in bag and seal with a knot...NOT the wire thingy! Assuming the chicken is a standard commercial sized bird, it will be size 12, 1.2kg (about 3lb). Put bagged bird in microwave oven and turn the thing on. For a 700 watt oven you need about 1 minute per 100grams. So a frozen size 12 needs 12 minutes on high (minimum). 15 minutes would be better.

Whilst frozen, bagged bird is being zapped...turn on normal oven at 180c. Then put pot on stove and make a roux. After 15 minutes bird is cooked (sort of). Take care to open bag and pour liquid into pot with roux to make sauce. Put bird in roasting tray and put in normal oven for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes bird is golden crispy and yummy on the outside and tender juicy moist on the inside...

Serve with the pan gravy you made. Along with what ever vege you want...like chips...Mmm, chicken n chips...I will be back in 35 minutes!
__________________

KissTC is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.