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Old 11-23-2010, 11:20 AM   #1
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Anybody ever use a clay baker?

I found this clay cooker at a second hand shop last year. It had never been used. It is a cooking implement from Italy made from volcanic rocks that promises to remove fats and harsh acids. It claims to transform economic cuts of meat to create a tenderness and flavour that would only be achieved through slow cooking." I have only used it once and never really noticed any difference.(Actually, I forget what I cooked in it). I think it is time to use it again. There are a few recipes with the manual but any other suggestions as to what I should try in it?


Here is a bit more info Healthy from 25 to 100: Cooking on a La Cotta

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Old 11-23-2010, 11:44 AM   #2
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It's an Italian version of a small Dutch oven, where Terra Cotta is cheaper than cast iron. The ability to flip the contents is a neat advantage.

The promises to remove fats and harsh acids is snake oil (fictional promises.) Yes, it may melt off some of the fat from a fatty piece of meat, but no more so than any other cooking vessel.
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Old 11-23-2010, 03:15 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
It's an Italian version of a small Dutch oven, where Terra Cotta is cheaper than cast iron. The ability to flip the contents is a neat advantage.

The promises to remove fats and harsh acids is snake oil (fictional promises.) Yes, it may melt off some of the fat from a fatty piece of meat, but no more so than any other cooking vessel.
Actually, it doesn't seal tight. The manual warns about not flipping...
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Old 11-23-2010, 04:08 PM   #4
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They're nice. I would just split them and turn them into wall hangers.
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Old 11-23-2010, 04:24 PM   #5
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I had a clay cooker.It worked just fine but like Selkie said, I don't think it cooked any better than other vessels.

You need to soak it for an hour submerged in water before using.That is why I gave mine up.
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Old 11-23-2010, 04:27 PM   #6
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Looks like it might be useful in a cooking on a hearth or other rustic setting. Why would you use it in a modern kitchen?

.40
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Old 11-23-2010, 05:06 PM   #7
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Looks like it might be useful in a cooking on a hearth or other rustic setting. Why would you use it in a modern kitchen?

.40
Hey .40. It looks that way, but the promo and manual look like it was from the 80's. The handles are plastic and the metal is fairly thin, so it probably wouldn't hold up to extreme heat. I think it was designed for stovetop cooking. I have used it on my gas range.
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Old 11-23-2010, 06:09 PM   #8
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Rocklobster, I have a BIGGER clay baker and I love it. It really does make things moist and tender and delicious.
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Old 11-23-2010, 06:15 PM   #9
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Rocklobster, I have a BIGGER clay baker and I love it. It really does make things moist and tender and delicious.
This isn't a baker for the oven. Check the link I posted. I have a couple of bakers also. This is designed for the stove top. This is why I posted it. It is an odd piece.
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Old 11-23-2010, 06:18 PM   #10
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Yep, I know that. You can still use it in much the same manner. I've seen those ones used too. I've even seen one used on the BBQ. Best chicken thighs EVER.
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