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Old 08-17-2009, 11:55 AM   #21
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I have an issue with basing a definition of roasting on the presence or absence of a spit or rack.

According to the book, "Roasting, A Simple Art" by Barbara Kafka, The two factors that differentiate roasting from baking are 1) the presence of a fat, either naturally occurring within the meat or added as part of the preparation, and 2) high heat, which is necessary to attain the desirable surface browning that is inherent to a successful roast.

She goes on to say that flat bottomed, low sided pans just big enough to contain the foods being roasted are best. She does not recommend racks as they do not real good and are hard to clean.

That's my take on it.
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Old 08-17-2009, 12:01 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
2) high heat, which is necessary to attain the desirable surface browning that is inherent to a successful roast.
This is what I meant by "directed heat source".
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Old 08-17-2009, 01:42 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
According to the book, "Roasting, A Simple Art" by Barbara Kafka... That's my take on it.
That's interesting.

My information comes from
:
Massimo Montanari, "Peasants, Warriors, Priests: Images of Society and Styles of Diet In Food, A Culinary History from Antiquity to the Present", edited by Jean-Louis Flandrin and Massimo Montanari, pp. 178185. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999.

I mean, as long as we're quoting sources...
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Old 08-17-2009, 02:03 PM   #24
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I wasn't trying to be snotty, Arky. Just wanted to offer some info on the topic that I felt was more on point. I guess we'll have to differ on this one.
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Old 08-17-2009, 02:19 PM   #25
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Ok, remember now kids. (say it with me) Text is a lousy medium for emotions. What reads "snarky" could just be straight.

Don't make me give examples. My texts have been known to cause internal bleeding.
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Old 08-17-2009, 04:20 PM   #26
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Here are some definitions of "roast" from various sources found on the web:

define:roast - Google Search
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Old 08-17-2009, 05:07 PM   #27
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That's what my electric GE ovens -- and every oven I've every used for that matter -- calls "broiling."

As for baking or roasting in the oven, only the bottom heating element is used in my ovens.

BTW, I found one site that suggests "roast" means to bake uncovered. Of course, that makes no sense when it comes to cookies and so forth.

I think the terms were invented to confuse foreigners so they won't be able to duplicate our wonderful cuisine.
Broiling is a completely different setting on the oven. You set it for broil, leave the door open at the first detent, and the top element stays on all the time for direct heat cooking.

In the convection roasting, the door is closed and the oven is maintained at a set temperature. The heat is somewhat more directed than it is in baking, but it isn't the same sort of high heat that is used in broiling. The only difference between the roasting and baking baking setting is that they use different elements to supply the heat.

BTW, I'm not saying that it's right or wrong, only that this is how the terms are used for my oven settings. Roasting usually involves meats, and as Andy said, that generally means some fat is present.
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Old 08-17-2009, 05:38 PM   #28
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I never pondered this question! This is a tough one! When I think of roasted turkey or roasted vegetables, I think of things that are deeply browned. When I think of baked things, the picture in my mind is of things only lightly browned. There doesn't seem to be rhyme or reason with temperature (roasted turkey cooks most of its time on 350, but I bake a pizza in a much hotter oven) or the type of food (there are recipes for roasted vegetables and baked meats). Really my "browning" idea doesn't even fly 100% - artisan loaves of bread are baked but can come out of the oven deeply browned. I can't really come to a definitive answer, I guess!
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Old 08-17-2009, 06:12 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Broiling is a completely different setting on the oven. You set it for broil, leave the door open at the first detent, and the top element stays on all the time for direct heat cooking.

In the convection roasting, the door is closed and the oven is maintained at a set temperature. The heat is somewhat more directed than it is in baking, but it isn't the same sort of high heat that is used in broiling. The only difference between the roasting and baking baking setting is that they use different elements to supply the heat.

BTW, I'm not saying that it's right or wrong, only that this is how the terms are used for my oven settings. Roasting usually involves meats, and as Andy said, that generally means some fat is present.
Convection adds an entirely different factor to the mix. You can have convection baking, convection roasting, and convection broiling.
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Old 08-17-2009, 06:55 PM   #30
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Roasted: Wire rack, grill or spit.

Everything else is baked.

Get it!? - Good!
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