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Old 08-16-2009, 01:59 PM   #1
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Baked or roasted?

I am a bit confused about english term roasted and baked.

Here in norway the oven has:
Grill
Grill + over heat
Over/under heat (thats what we normally use)
Fan (that cirkel the air in the oven so I can make cakes at to levels)
Fan + under heat (good for pizza..)

When I was on holiday in FL we rented a small apartment with kitchen. It seemed like the oven only had under heat and grill. It also had a broiler pan. We dont use that in norway.

But anyway.

What is the difference between baked and roasted meat?
Is it with over/under heat or only under heat?

Broiled meat, is that with the grill on a broiler pan? Is there not any other heat, only the broiler?
It is not normal to broil food here so I am very curios how that works!

Thanks for any answers!

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Old 08-16-2009, 02:04 PM   #2
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Baked is where the heating is even all the way around the item being baked.

Roasted or broiled is where the heat comes from a single source and is directed at one side of the item at a time.
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Old 08-16-2009, 02:05 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdaddy3k View Post
Baked is where the heating is even all the way around the item being baked.

Roasted or broiled is where the heat comes from a single source and is directed at one side of the item at a time.
So if it is roasted the heat will come from under the meat? And broiled is over?
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Old 08-16-2009, 02:16 PM   #4
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The majority of ovens in the US have two heat sources. One at the top of the oven which is used for broiling. That is cooking the top surface of a piece of meat with direct heat. This often requires you to turn the food over to cook the second side. Think of this as an upside down charcoal grill. Broiling is used for smaller pieces of meat, poultry and fish. Such as steaks hamburgers, etc.

The second heat source is at the bottom of the oven either under the oven floor in the case of gas or just above it for electric. The bottom heat source is used for baking and roasting. Baking and roasting are essentially the same - dry indirect heat that heats the air surrounding the meat in a low sided pan.

Baking is more often used to describe things like breads and cakes while roasting is used to describe meats.

However, in the case of chicken, cooking a whole chicken is commonly referred to as roast chicken. If you cut had that same chicken into pieces and cooked them using the same heat source, it's referred to as baked chicken. Go figure.

A small fan that circulates the air in the oven makes baking/roasting more efficient by constantly moving the air around so hot air is always on the move and in contact with the food.
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Old 08-16-2009, 02:40 PM   #5
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Thank you so much for answer :)

Now I understand a bit more!

I have been very confused about this. I normally use over and under heat (but not the broiler).
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Old 08-16-2009, 03:29 PM   #6
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I don't think there's any real difference between "bake" and "roast." Both refer to cooking by dry heat.

As Andy said, "bake" usually refers to breads, cakes, cookies, and so forth, cooked in an oven, but it can also refer to meats (for example, "baked chicken" or "baked fish," which are usually cooked in a sauce of some sort).

"Roast" usually refers to meats, poultry, or fish ("roast beef" or "roast chicken") that are cooked in the oven without a sauce.

At least that's how I've come to understand the terms. There may be regional differences in how these words are understood.
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Old 08-16-2009, 05:46 PM   #7
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My understanding, after consulting some of my old time recipe books goes something like this:

To bake means oven cooking or cooking in coals using some sort of a baking dish or container as in casseroles, cakes, pies, souffles, Dutch Oven, etc.

To roast primarily refers to oven or open fire cooking that may include a wire rack, rotisserie, grill or means of support other than a baking dish.

Simplicity. What is the food being cooked in or on?
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Old 08-16-2009, 05:54 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
The majority of ovens in the US have two heat sources. One at the top of the oven which is used for broiling. That is cooking the top surface of a piece of meat with direct heat. This often requires you to turn the food over to cook the second side. Think of this as an upside down charcoal grill. Broiling is used for smaller pieces of meat, poultry and fish. Such as steaks hamburgers, etc.

The second heat source is at the bottom of the oven either under the oven floor in the case of gas or just above it for electric. The bottom heat source is used for baking and roasting. Baking and roasting are essentially the same - dry indirect heat that heats the air surrounding the meat in a low sided pan.

Baking is more often used to describe things like breads and cakes while roasting is used to describe meats.

However, in the case of chicken, cooking a whole chicken is commonly referred to as roast chicken. If you cut had that same chicken into pieces and cooked them using the same heat source, it's referred to as baked chicken. Go figure.

A small fan that circulates the air in the oven makes baking/roasting more efficient by constantly moving the air around so hot air is always on the move and in contact with the food.
absolutely correct. i may just add that an oven with a fan to circulate the heat is called a convection oven and the fan helps cook food faster and more evenly.
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Old 08-16-2009, 10:10 PM   #9
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In my Samsung range, roasting uses the top element with the convection fan while baking or convection baking uses the bottom element. I haven't had the range long enough to really try everything out yet, so I can't do more than just repeat what the instruction manual says.
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Old 08-16-2009, 10:25 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
In my Samsung range, roasting uses the top element with the convection fan while baking or convection baking uses the bottom element. I haven't had the range long enough to really try everything out yet, so I can't do more than just repeat what the instruction manual says.
is it electric? i have a gas convection and the top of the oven is a broiler with flames not for roasting or baking. my convection uses the heat from under the floor of my oven for convection baking or regular baking and convection roasting or regular roasting. yes i have a choice with both baking or roasting to use the fan or not. there is only hi or low broil and that adjusts the flames on the roof of the oven only. the top won't come on unless broiler is turned on (top and bottom heat sources WILL NOT come on at the same time)
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