"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-24-2007, 03:49 PM   #1
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Barbara Kafka's "Roasting" - Thermometer Calibration Question

My brother in law got me this book for my birthday. I am very excited to be reading it and trying her techniques. I have only had a few minutes today to flip through so far, but she wrote something that I am wondering if it was a typo or not.

She was talking about instant read thermometers and how you should check their accuracy every once in a while. To do this she said to stick the tip into boiling water. It should read 210 F. Is this a typo do you think or is there a reason it would not be 212?

__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 04:18 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,280
Great book, isn't it? Make sure you do a chicken right away. But put some really thinly sliced potatoes under it or the smoke alrms will go off.

About the thermometer.....

Water boils at 212 at sea level. The boiling point decreases 1 degree for every 500 feet above sea level the water is boiling at.

You are no doubt somewhat above sea level. Find out how much and adjust accordingly. 210 would be for 1000 feet above.

An alternative is calibrating it in a glass filled with crushed ice and topped off with water so it is still mostly ice. Stir the slush mixture well. The thermometer should read 32.
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 04:21 PM   #3
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Yes I am loving this book so far!!!

I knew that about sea level and temps, but I find it odd that she would say the temp should read 210 without making any mention of seal level or anything else. Most people know that water boils at 212 so while I knew what she was getting , I just found the way she said it a little misleading.

This book is making me very hungry.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 04:29 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,280
It is weird, as she lives in NYC, I think ....
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 04:35 PM   #5
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Well, unless she's discussing how the boiling point of water changes with the weather or altitude (barometric pressure) - I would stick with 212ºF. That's what the thermometer makers suggest for calibrating them.

For example, at standard 1-Atmosphere sea-level barometric pressure (29.92 inches Hg) - water boils at 212ºF. But, you have a high-pressure system sitting over you and the barometric pressure is 30.5 in/Hg - the boiling point of water is 213.07ºF. If you've got a low-pressure system sitting over you and the pressure falls to 29 in/Hg - the boiling point falls to 210.3ºF.

If you can find out your barometric pressure - you can use this Pressure Corrected Boiling Temperature of Water Calculator

If you have an old-fashioned wet-blub analog candy/fry thermometer (the kind with a liquid that rises in a glass tube) you can use that to determine the boiling point of water - and adjust your instant-read accordingly.

RE: Calibrating Instant Read Thermometers

There are two types - analogs that use springs and have a pointer dial, and digital. For the analog type - they should be calibrated on the high end of the scale - since that is where you are going to be using them. For digital types - they usually have two calibration settings - the Zero and the Span ... you calibrate the Zero setting for ice-water (32ºF) and the Span for boiling water (212ºF).
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 04:43 PM   #6
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,280
That is exactly why I calibrate my thermometers in ice water!!
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 05:31 PM   #7
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,395
GB:

I assume you're referring to her book, ROASTING. I have that as well and really like it.

I use both boiling and ice water to check accuracy at both ends of the scale. You should never have an issue with a digital thermometer but it never hurts to be sure. Analog therms can go wrong and should be checked more frequently.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 08:48 PM   #8
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Yep Andy I was talking about ROASTING (did I forget to mention that )

Yeah I know all about calibrating and how to do it. It just struck me as really odd that a woman who obviously knows her stuff would say to calibrate to 210 with no other explanation.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 09:08 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
GB - if she didn't give a reason for calibrating at 210F - I would assume it was a typo. Writing a cookbook is a big task - editors are involved who don't know what they are doing (they edit text but don't necessarily know anything about the topic) ... things get overlooked from one revision to another ... and after you've read the same book over several times you just overlook mistakes like this.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 09:12 PM   #10
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Yeah that seems to make the most sense Michael.

Toots, at least pull it out and give it another read before you decide. From what I am seeing, this is going to be a keeper for me for a long long time.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.