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Old 12-05-2012, 02:35 PM   #31
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In your original post you said:

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It was my first attempt & even though the sauce flavour was tasty the meat had shrunk a lot into small pieces and seem fatty in places (soft jelly type fat) which i didn't like.
Just so you know for the future, shin meat is full of connective tissue and what you thought was fat was actually that "jelly like substance" of connective tissue. I don't like it either but apparently it's used much more often in the UK for stew.
That being said, it sounds like the young butcher was not off the mark with her recommendation.
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Old 12-05-2012, 03:38 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
The difference between stewing and braising is that braising describes slow-cooking a fairly large piece of meat (generally at least 2-3 lbs.) and sometimes vegetables, while stewing is slow-cooking meat and vegetables cut into bite-size or slightly larger pieces. Tough cuts from the shoulder or rear end are suitable for this; they're tough because they are used by the animal more than tender cuts, such as those along the back.
Whole chickens are commonly stewed. Sometimes with no veggies.
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Old 12-05-2012, 04:18 PM   #33
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I've heard a few descriptions of the difference between stewing and braising.

The large piece of meat vs. bite-sized pieces is one. The other is that stewing involves meat (and veggies) being fully submerged in a liquid where braising involves the meat to be only partially submerged.

We've run into the imprecise nature of cooking terms before. After all, it's called a pot roast but it isn't roasted, it's braised. A whole chicken is roasted but a cut up chicken is baked even though they're but cooked with dry heat.
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Old 12-05-2012, 05:10 PM   #34
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As Andy said, it can be imprecise. This is one thing I learned in the short time I was in cooking school; not that that means it's the definitive definition, but it works for me
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Old 12-29-2012, 01:09 PM   #35
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Shoulder chuck is what I use. Of the two ends of the cut tell your butcher you want the end with the most fat. 'Low and slow' at 200 F is perfect. Any higher than 212 F and the protein strands in any meat will turn into rubber bands. Shoulder chuck has the perfect ratio of connective tissue to fat. Juicy delicious large two inch plus chunks and whole mushrooms the same size. Good for you making sure you added a good wine and not cheap 'plonk'.
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Old 01-01-2013, 04:46 PM   #36
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For the OP in the UK . For this type of dish use stewing steak or braising steak and cook it on a slow heat for a good 2 hours in the oven . I seal it first by frying it in batches and then put it in your pot , no need to soak overnight in wine first . I use Julia Childs Boeuf Bourgignon recipe . You should be left with a dark rich stew and the meat should be very very tender .
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Old 01-01-2013, 05:18 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Shoulder chuck is what I use. Of the two ends of the cut tell your butcher you want the end with the most fat. 'Low and slow' at 200 F is perfect. Any higher than 212 F and the protein strands in any meat will turn into rubber bands. Shoulder chuck has the perfect ratio of connective tissue to fat. Juicy delicious large two inch plus chunks and whole mushrooms the same size. Good for you making sure you added a good wine and not cheap 'plonk'.
Since all chuck comes from the shoulder of the cow, it's unnecessary and potentially confusing to call it "shoulder chuck.". That would be akin to a "leg shank."

Also you may potentially confuse people by saying "Low and slow' at 200 F is perfect. Any higher than 212 F and the protein strands in any meat will turn into rubber bands.". That suggests that actually cooking meat at a temp above 212 will ruin meat, which is absolutely false. A final internal temperature of 212 no matter what temp you cook at may be undesirable but its fine to cook meat at much higher temperatures.

I agree that a stew like BB is best made with a flavorful cut like chuck that benefits from a nice long braise. I do mine at 275.
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Old 01-02-2013, 10:04 AM   #38
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Since all chuck comes from the shoulder of the cow, it's unnecessary and potentially confusing to call it "shoulder chuck.". That would be akin to a "leg shank."

Also you may potentially confuse people by saying "Low and slow' at 200 F is perfect. Any higher than 212 F and the protein strands in any meat will turn into rubber bands.". That suggests that actually cooking meat at a temp above 212 will ruin meat, which is absolutely false. A final internal temperature of 212 no matter what temp you cook at may be undesirable but its fine to cook meat at much higher temperatures.

I agree that a stew like BB is best made with a flavorful cut like chuck that benefits from a nice long braise. I do mine at 275.
I ought to have put a '/' between shoulder and chuck. It may confuse people to use the word "cow" which implies all beef comes from a "cow". When properly used the word 'cow' is used to describe a female bovine creature. Beef 'cattle' is more accurate IMO.
I think 'sous vide' demonstrates there is no need to roast/cook/stew/braise any meat/protein at any higher heat than the desired finished temperature. A quick sear after the sous vide process adds to the appearance and flavor.
'Low and slow' IMO is the future of cooking meat especially. The science/logic behind the method can not be disputed. With the cost of protein going up more people or making an extra effort to roast that $40 piece of protein to perfection.
350-450 F oven settings turn the exterior to leather and ironically more often than not leave the meat that is actually in contact with bones deep inside a bird/haunch/roast etc. at unsafe temperatures. This isn't a 'theory' or an 'opinion', it's a cold hard scientific fact. Hence 'sous vide'.
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Old 01-02-2013, 10:41 AM   #39
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
I think 'sous vide' demonstrates there is no need to roast/cook/stew/braise any meat/protein at any higher heat than the desired finished temperature. A quick sear after the sous vide process adds to the appearance and flavor.
I've never cooked sous vide, but I assume the cooking and searing need to be done in different pans?

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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
350-450 F oven settings turn the exterior to leather and ironically more often than not leave the meat that is actually in contact with bones deep inside a bird/haunch/roast etc. at unsafe temperatures. This isn't a 'theory' or an 'opinion', it's a cold hard scientific fact. Hence 'sous vide'.
Interesting. I've been roasting poultry, beef and pork at 350+ degrees F for years and as long as it isn't overcooked, it doesn't end up with a leathery exterior or unsafe interior.
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Old 01-02-2013, 10:59 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
350-450 F oven settings turn the exterior to leather and ironically more often than not leave the meat that is actually in contact with bones deep inside a bird/haunch/roast etc. at unsafe temperatures. This isn't a 'theory' or an 'opinion', it's a cold hard scientific fact. Hence 'sous vide'.

It's certainly not a "fact"

If your protein is leathery on the outside and raw on the inside from roasting at 350, you can only blame your cooking skills, not the temperature of the oven.
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