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Old 10-19-2007, 11:24 PM   #1
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Beef wontons with habenero teriyaki?

OK. Second try on the beef wontons. We use all natural beef from Washington (86% lean). I minced some shallots and mixed them with the beef (with a dash of soy sauce and Worcestershire). I browned the bottoms in olive oil and them steamed them (watching the flame, of course), in fish broth. Drizzled with habenero teriyaki. This time they ended up a bit undercooked, but the wrap was perfect.

What I am seeking advice on is how to cook the beef thoroughly without pre-cooking it. Any suggestions?

Also, should I pre-make the teriyaki and drizzle on at room temp, or hot in the pan?

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Old 10-20-2007, 12:34 AM   #2
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What cut of beef are you using? Also, temperature and the amount of filling in each wonton will affect cooking time and doneness.
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Old 10-20-2007, 10:16 AM   #3
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I'm just using ground chuck. I may be packing them too tightly. I'll try it with the meat warmer.
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Old 10-20-2007, 01:12 PM   #4
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How about steaming them longer?

Lee
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Old 10-20-2007, 02:13 PM   #5
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Try changing the profile of the wonton so it's not as thick. A flatter filling will cook through faster than a thicker one.
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Old 10-20-2007, 05:22 PM   #6
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I browned the bottoms in olive oil and them steamed them

I steam them first, then brown them. Not sure if this would make a difference. They sure sound good.
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Old 10-20-2007, 09:38 PM   #7
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Thanks all... Andy, I'd really like to make them like gyoza, but I haven't found round wraps or wraps large enough to cut them into rounds. I think steaming them longer will help, Lee, but I really think that I just packed them too tight.
Loprraine, If I steam them first and then brown them, how do I prevent the foreseeable sticking? If the wet wrap hits the oil (even if it's smoking hot) are they going to stick and tear?

At any rate, they are very tasty. I am trying not to season the meat too much because of the quality of the meat. A little worsh, soy, and shallots go a long way. I was rather pleased with the fusion of the teri with the habenero. I've been afraid of habeneros because of their intense heat, but roasting them cools them down and bring out the flavor. Any suggestions on a garnish to cool it all down further? Perhaps cucumber and avocado?
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Old 10-20-2007, 10:49 PM   #8
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I wish I could see a picture of your wontons, abandon! They sound great!

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Old 10-21-2007, 12:46 AM   #9
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Abandonship, I am glad you have probably figured it out. I had been lurking but said nothing because I could not figure out what was going on. Frying and steaming is one ccommon way of making potstickers as you well know, and that is close to what you seem to be preparing, so I was at a loss for ideas. Hope less in the pan helps.

I like the idea of a bit of a cooling salad with the dish. Am not sure how a vinagrette type of dressing would work with the teriyaki/habanero. Might try some kind of salad with a more fat based dressing, perhaps even a tzatziki or a yogurt based one. No great idea leaps to mind though.

Good luck.
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Old 10-21-2007, 02:34 PM   #10
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[quote=abandonship;497538]OK. Second try on the beef wontons. We use all natural beef from Washington (86% lean). I minced some shallots and mixed them with the beef (with a dash of soy sauce and Worcestershire). I browned the bottoms in olive oil and them steamed them (watching the flame, of course), in fish broth. Drizzled with habenero teriyaki. This time they ended up a bit undercooked, but the wrap was perfect.

What I am seeking advice on is how to cook the beef thoroughly without pre-cooking it. Any suggestions?

Also, should I pre-make the teriyaki and drizzle on at room temp, or hot in the pan?[/quote]

Welcome to DC, abandonship.

Okay, step by step - first, as I understand your post, you fryed the won tons and then steamed them? I usually use one cooking method for won tons - steam, fry, boil or bake. (Except, on occasion for perogies - which I have boiled briefly and then fry for crispness - but, too much work - I either boil or fry them, as the dough is thicker.)

No need to precook the beef. Use about a tbl of filling. I don't have a bamboo steamer, so when I steam, I use a metal steaming tray sprayed w cooking spray - placed over boiling water in a Dutch oven on the stovetop. Cover, and w/i a few minutes they are cooked thru - the skins will look translusent.

If I boil them, fill the wontons with raw mixture, seal, place in boiling water. When they float to the top, they are done.

If you want them crisp, either deep fry, fry in a skillet (be sure the oil is hot enough), or spray the filled wrappers with cooking spray and bake. Different texture, but still good.

Re the sauce - I would drizzle it over the cooked won tons or serve it on the side. Hope that helps.
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