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Old 08-28-2012, 09:18 PM   #1
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Boiled Peanuts?

I am a west coast girl transplanted to the east.

Today while shopping I saw something I have never ever seen before. It was a huge mega sized display of canned boiled peanuts.

I have no idea what in the world a person does with these.

I'm sure there are a few here who can teach this old dog a new trick
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Old 08-28-2012, 10:23 PM   #2
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Here on the west coast in a Korean market I see what appears to be canned locusts. There's no accounting for regional taste... (I think they had them marked "not for human consumption" to get around FDA regulations.)
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Old 08-28-2012, 10:31 PM   #3
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Boiled peanuts are a big thing in the South. I personally didn't care for them when I lived in Texas. Unless they say salted on the can, they have no flavor at all. Even a boiled steak would have more flavor than boiled peanuts without salt.
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Old 08-29-2012, 05:48 AM   #4
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Boiled peanuts are one of those things that seem to evoke utter disgust or pure ecstasy with little middle ground. I like 'em.... Mrs Hoot, on the other hand has no difficulty expressing her dislike of them. Right out the can is ok with me. I have heard of folks making hummus with them and I seem to recall a recipe for chocolate chip cookies that used boiled peanuts. I reckon they can used pretty much like any other nut in a recipe...only the texture of boiled peanuts is kinda soft. I won't tell you what Mrs Hoot says about the texture.
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Old 08-29-2012, 05:51 AM   #5
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I will say that, IMHO, freshly made boiled peanuts are far and away superior to canned ones.
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Old 08-29-2012, 06:08 AM   #6
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So I am getting that this is simply a snack then and not an ingredient.

Think I will stay away from them. The photo on the label was not at all appealing to me.

Thanks for your replies everyone.
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Old 08-29-2012, 11:19 AM   #7
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There are recognized variants of Georgia Boiled Peanuts, Cajun seasoned, Texas Style, and Chinese (with star anise). All begin with green (raw) peanuts. For the true boiled peanut lover, they are a seasonal food, using only freshly harvested peanuts from the green nuts in spring, through the summer end of season. Just as the peanut is a legume and not really a nut, boiled peanuts have little nut-like about them. They are more like what you would anticipate from a bean. Probably best you don't get involved with them. They can become a serious addiction.








Vegetables and boiled peanuts - Beijing
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Old 08-29-2012, 11:35 AM   #8
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Probably best you don't get involved with them. They can become a serious addiction.
LOL Don't need another addiction .. coffee and chocolate are good enough for me. Thanks for the info though. Perhaps I will encounter them at a fair or the likes sometime and give them a try.
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Old 08-29-2012, 11:36 AM   #9
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Cold Cider & Sorghum Syrup

Beautiful photograph, thanks GLC
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Old 08-29-2012, 01:36 PM   #10
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Sorghum syrup production has been falling since the 1940's in the U.S. It takes a lot of time and energy to make, and it's been overtaken by cane syrup, a very sweet syrup produced early in the boiling of sugar cane juice, a favorite U.S. brand being Stein's



and molasses from the second boiling/extraction of syrup, and blackstrap, the low sugar but high nutrient product of the third boiling.

It's not that there isn't a lot of sweet sorghum grown for livestock feed. Where I am, sorghum and cotton are the predominate crops, because both do better than corn when it doesn't rain.




The cold cider would be fresh soft cider, although this nation was largely built on hard cider. The first thing people moving west would do was plant apple trees so they could start fermenting cider. In some places, you couldn't claim ownership of the land you settled on unless you planted apple trees. Jonathan Chapman, the semi-legendary Johnny Appleseed was providing for hard cider. He started apple nurseries from seed and left them under local care, and apples from seed generally produce tart apples valued for hard cider.

Likely, if you were friends with the operator of the stand in the photo, you could have access to the hard cider jug or the more potent applejack brandy jug behind the counter.
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