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Old 02-17-2006, 12:47 PM   #11
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I prefer the taste of the bone-in breasts. Not only are they cheaper, but they have a lot more flavor. I do keep some boneless ones on hand, though, for a quick chicken sandwich.
I have been cutting up my own chickens for years, and it's no trick at all to bone the breast. Feel your way around...a lot of the bones will just pull out.

Here's a site with pictures...

http://www.ehow.com/how_2706_bone-chicken-breast.html

And this one shows how to bone a whole chicken...

http://www.ehow.com/how_2069_bone-whole-chicken.html
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Old 02-17-2006, 07:06 PM   #12
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I also prefer bone-in, and for a variety of reasons. First, like Constance said, bone-in meats have more flavor. They are usually easier to cook to succulent perfection.

Second, The meat stays fresher longer if it isn't handled as much.

Third, If I'm removing the bones for a particular recipe, I save them, and the skin for making stocks and soups. In fact, poultry are full of healthful nutrients that are difficult to get elsewhere. Just make sure you crack the bones before boiling them.

Seeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 02-17-2006, 07:19 PM   #13
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"...In fact, poultry are full of healthful nutrients that are difficult to get elsewhere. Just make sure you crack the bones before boiling them..."

Well said, Goodweed. I've never cracked my bones first, though...I just simmer them all day, then strain, put broth back in kettle and reduce it by half.

By the way, the experts now admit that chicken soup really can help you get over colds and flu. It's important that you eat it from a mug, inhaling the vapors. Our grandmothers knew what they were talking about. I think even Vick's Vapor Rub is making a comeback.

And by the way, the less someone else handles my meat, the happier I am. My husband and I tend to buy big chunks of meat and cut them to our own specifications.
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Old 02-18-2006, 07:58 AM   #14
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I buy my with bones in them. With a sharp knife just slowing and carefully cut the meat away from the bone. It save the bones in a freezer bag and just keep adding to it until i get a bag full and then make stock or soup. Usually has some meat left on the bones. When I make the stock I divide it up into 16oz containers and freeze it for when I need a can of chicken broth. Saving $$ all the way around.
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Old 02-18-2006, 04:22 PM   #15
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Remember, though, that if you are throwing away the bones and skin (I don't; stock is the name of the game) then the price difference may not be worth the extra trouble. If you're young, two or three jobs, a few kids, then the boneless/skinless IQF may be the only way to go. I personally used to do a lot of cooking for my extended family, and had a couple of regular "guests" who were very fussy eaters. It was always nice to have those frozen chicken breasts to feed them. Some people prefer their food with less flavor!!!
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Old 02-20-2006, 05:11 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
"...In fact, poultry are full of healthful nutrients that are difficult to get elsewhere. Just make sure you crack the bones before boiling them..."

Well said, Goodweed. I've never cracked my bones first, though...I just simmer them all day, then strain, put broth back in kettle and reduce it by half.

By the way, the experts now admit that chicken soup really can help you get over colds and flu. It's important that you eat it from a mug, inhaling the vapors. Our grandmothers knew what they were talking about. I think even Vick's Vapor Rub is making a comeback.

And by the way, the less someone else handles my meat, the happier I am. My husband and I tend to buy big chunks of meat and cut them to our own specifications.
Cracking the bones allows the nutrients from the bone marrow, and the collagen to dissolve into the liquid. Cooking with slighly acidic veggies, such as cekery root, onion, garlic, and celery also help extract the vital nutrients. In China, broths made from bones and marrow are called "soups of longevity" and have been prized for centuries.

To be sure, cooking all day in boiling water will extract the nutrients as well. But as I'm the bread-winner in my home, and the head cook and bottle washer, time is often at a premium. I find that any shortcuts I can find to speed things up are very useful to me. For broths and extracting nutrients and flavors, I always crack the bones, add acidic veggies, and usualy use a pressure cooker. I get the same quality and flavor in this manner as I would by cooking for extended periods of time, but usually in a mere 45 minutes. I also found that if l let the broth cook for much more than that, I have to dilute with water as the flavor becomes too concentrated.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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