"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-15-2006, 02:29 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 49
Boneless Chicken Breasts vs Split Breasts

Okay I have a beginner's question! I usually buy boneless, skinless chicken breasts but they're so darn expensive- $5.35 for 3-4 breasts! The grocery has "split chicken breasts" on sale and I'm wondering what the difference is. Do they have a bone? Is there an easy way to just take the bone out and end up with "boneless, skinless chicken breasts"? Sorry if this is a really stupid question! lol

~K

__________________

__________________
k_young221 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2006, 02:31 PM   #2
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,418
Split chicken breasts still have some rib and backbone on them. Its not terribly hard to debone them, just a bit painstaking for some folks. A nice alternative for you might be to buy frozen boneless skinless breasts. I get around 8-10lbs at Costco (Sam's Club) for about $30 roughly.
__________________

__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2006, 02:38 PM   #3
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 49
Thaks for the quick response! We don't have a warehouse store nearby, but I'll look for a website that tells me how to debone them. I'm willing to put in a little extra work to save $$!

Thanks!
~K
__________________
k_young221 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2006, 02:39 PM   #4
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,418
Its not really that hard to do. Pick some up and just fiddle with them, you won't need instruction, trust me.

Welcome to DC!
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2006, 02:43 PM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 49
LOL okay I'll give it a shot! My parents always told me I had no common sense, so I tend to research the heck out of something before trying it. =)

BTW this looks like an awesome forum. I'll definitely be coming back regularly!

~K
__________________
k_young221 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2006, 03:00 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13
Alix is right, also here shops in Rome I see some significant difference in price between already separated chicken breasts and split chicken breasts, practically the same items!! To me it is a great saving opportunity for not so much of a work... like Alix said, no need for instructions... you can see and feel the bone and sinews, just slice around them, also making sure to slice around your own fingers as well (chicken can be a bit slippery so never push the blade towards any of your body part!! also if the chicken if semi-frozen--not completely though--it is much more manageable to cut!)

BTW welcome to the forum!! Hope you will hang with us a lot, here "TheresAlwaysSomebodyHome" to help and entertain you!!
__________________
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2006, 03:13 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 8,447
A lot of the time you can cook them bone-in. It's easy enough to eat around the bones.

You do need to trim off some of the rib portion though. I use scissors.
__________________
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2006, 03:41 PM   #8
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 37,161
The more a chicken has to be handled, the more expensive it is. You are, essentially, paying someone to split the breasts or debone them.

If you can learn to cut up and debone a whole chicken and use all the parts, that will be the least expensive way to go. If that's more than you want to deal with, then go with the least processed pieces you can deal with.

I sometime will buy up to a dozen whole chicken breasts on sale, then debone them for boneless chicken breasts. That leaves me with the bones to make a stock. It also gives me the option of having boneless breasts with the skin still on for some recipes.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2006, 05:17 PM   #9
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,417
We prefer chicken breasts with the keel bone intact, usually try to get them split.

Cooking them with the bone and cartilage in keeps in the juices.

Can bake or broil them, or cook them on the grill.

They are easier to cook without drying out than the boneless version.

If there is a downside, you have to deal with the keel bone, which really is not a problem.

We grew up with the breasts with the bone in, and find boneless a poor second in general.
__________________
auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2006, 10:59 AM   #10
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 8,128
My response is that if I'm cooking on the grill outside, I want bones and skin. During the winter, it is nice to have them prepped and ready to go for stir fries, chicken fingers, curries, etc. In fact, my favorite chicken is one that has everything on it ... somehow a roasted, fully dressed chicken in the oven or on the weber has more flavor. Then the carcase goes into the pot for stock. Don't get me wrong; my freezer almost always holds a bag of bonless, skinless breasts and one of wings (we have a neighborhood thing about wings). But to me, the more bone and skin, the more flavor.
__________________

__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cooking News & Tips Straight to your Email!

Stay up-to-date with Cooking info to your inbox!

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]