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Old 01-22-2009, 04:15 PM   #11
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Taters..

I've never poked holes in my baking potatoes. I rinse and dry and wrap them in foil and place them in a 400 oven for about an hour and a half or two hours. I can imagine it could "explode" in a microwave, but I've never had that happen.
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Old 01-22-2009, 04:17 PM   #12
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I agree with Phil. The only time I poke em is when they are going into the microwave. In an oven or in a camp fire I do not bother poking.
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Old 01-22-2009, 04:23 PM   #13
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I haven't had it happen but I've talked to a few people who did have brined potatoes explode because they aren't wrapped in foil, they are baked right on the rack. The foil doesn't allow the coating to crisp up which is why when you brine and coat but do not wrap, it is indeed a good idea to poke. My understanding from those who didn't poke say it happened because the brine develops a steam and the steam cooks the potato from inside as well as out.

Personally, I would rather poke than take the chance. The first place I saw this method was on a cooking show and the host did emphasize poking.
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Old 01-22-2009, 04:53 PM   #14
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Mmmm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Callisto in NC View Post
I haven't had it happen but I've talked to a few people who did have brined potatoes explode because they aren't wrapped in foil, they are baked right on the rack. The foil doesn't allow the coating to crisp up which is why when you brine and coat but do not wrap, it is indeed a good idea to poke. My understanding from those who didn't poke say it happened because the brine develops a steam and the steam cooks the potato from inside as well as out.

Personally, I would rather poke than take the chance. The first place I saw this method was on a cooking show and the host did emphasize poking.
That's quite interesting. The only way to know for sure is try it out. We used to put potatoes up exhaust pipes as kids, but that's another story. I haven't experimented with brines and wonder if they add any real flavor to the potato at all. If you eat the skin, I see the justification. Salt on the skin of fowl, on the grill, acts as a "browning bag" as it seals in the juices. Years and years ago there was a steak house that touted a "rosin" baked potato, done in paper bags. I really don't know as someone will have to post from their experiences.
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Old 01-23-2009, 07:26 PM   #15
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That's quite interesting. The only way to know for sure is try it out. We used to put potatoes up exhaust pipes as kids, but that's another story. I haven't experimented with brines and wonder if they add any real flavor to the potato at all. If you eat the skin, I see the justification. Salt on the skin of fowl, on the grill, acts as a "browning bag" as it seals in the juices. Years and years ago there was a steak house that touted a "rosin" baked potato, done in paper bags. I really don't know as someone will have to post from their experiences.
Having done potatoes both ways, I believe brining does add flavor and fluff. The potatoes seem lighter in the middle. I'm just saying, it is my preferred method and if you are going to do it, poke before baking.
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Old 01-23-2009, 08:17 PM   #16
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What is liquid margarine?????
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:12 PM   #17
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What is liquid margarine?????
Ds says it's like the spray Parkay.....only in large quantities. They have it shipped in from corporate.

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