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Old 07-14-2016, 12:03 AM   #31
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Bread to keep the brown sugar soft? Hmm, never thought of that. I have used: lettuce, cabbage, orange peel, apple peel, a wet paper towel taped to the lid of the canister, but never tried bread.

If my brown sugar turns into a large, very hard lump, I use the rasp attachment on my meat grinder. I get a something that looks like white sugar, except brown and then it doesn't harden again. And yes, I have used the add-molasses-to-white-sugar method and it works fine.

Thanks for the link to the article and recipe for toasted sugar. That was interesting and I'm going to give it a try.
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Old 07-14-2016, 07:59 AM   #32
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Remember the "Old" Fiesta tableware? The dishes came in all colors. It was found that the red dishes had lead in them from the red paint. If you used one of the cups for acidic drinks like orange juice, it would leech out the lead into the juice. Those red dishes today are highly prized and very rare. Unused, but prized none the less. Some states now require antique dealers to mark those cups inside and dishes so that they can't be used.

I have a vintage red Fiestaware platter that I use all the time. But just as a serving platter
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Old 07-14-2016, 09:39 AM   #33
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I have a vintage red Fiestaware platter that I use all the time. But just as a serving platter
I loved those dishes as a kid. I would see them in my friends house, and wish my mother would get them. They were so colorful and made the table look inviting.

When I lived in Washington, there was an antique shop just down the street from my home. He had a whole set of them, and the owner had a big warning label on all the red pieces.
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Old 07-14-2016, 10:15 PM   #34
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Bread to keep the brown sugar soft? Hmm, never thought of that.
My mom used to make some sort of soft chocolate cookie, and she would put a slice of bread on top of those in the cookie jar to keep them soft.
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Old 07-15-2016, 12:03 PM   #35
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Bread to keep the brown sugar soft? Hmm, never thought of that. I have used: lettuce, cabbage, orange peel, apple peel, a wet paper towel taped to the lid of the canister, but never tried bread.
You can also use a marshmallow. Anything that will absorb the moisture from the sugar.
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Old 07-15-2016, 12:42 PM   #36
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Addie, you want moist brown sugar. If the moisture is absorbed, you have a brown brick. The bread adds moisture to the canister and softens the sugar.
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Old 07-15-2016, 12:48 PM   #37
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Addie, you want moist brown sugar. If the moisture is absorbed, you have a brown brick. The bread adds moisture to the canister and softens the sugar.
Agreed.

My "wet paper towel taped to the lid of the canister" doesn't absorb water.
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Old 07-15-2016, 01:01 PM   #38
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You can also use a marshmallow. Anything that will absorb the moisture from the sugar.
It's the other way around. You put an object that contains moisture in the container to prevent the sugar from drying out.
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Old 07-15-2016, 02:17 PM   #39
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Addie, you want moist brown sugar. If the moisture is absorbed, you have a brown brick. The bread adds moisture to the canister and softens the sugar.
You're right. And I thought that too. But the place I saw about the marshmallow said just the opposite. Because if you leave whatever in there, eventually the bread, marshmallow, etc. will become very dry and hard.
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Old 07-15-2016, 02:53 PM   #40
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You're right. And I thought that too. But the place I saw about the marshmallow said just the opposite. Because if you leave whatever in there, eventually the bread, marshmallow, etc. will become very dry and hard.
They become dry and hard because they're *losing* moisture to the sugar.
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