"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-10-2016, 11:54 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Seattle
Posts: 185
"Brownulated" Sugar

I moved to the West Coast ten years ago, and have been searching in vain for "brownulated" sugar. My motivation was that I don't use sugar much, so the brown sugar I'd buy would solidify itself between uses.

"Brownulated" sugar is sold by Domino on the East Coast. Here's the Cooks' Illustrated take on it, which isn't all positive. The great advantage is that it stays as separate grains.

But now Kenji at Serious Eats has deconstructed the stuff and came up with a recipe to make your own, with whatever characteristics you want.

His closing statement: "Set aside that blowtorch and step back from the stove. There's a new caramel in town, and it has the power to change every recipe you've ever known" may be a bit strong, but it's certainly giving me ideas.

__________________

__________________
outRIAAge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 12:27 AM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,910
Put a piece of bread in the container with the brown sugar and it will be fine.

Btw, that article was written by Stella Parks, the baking expert at Serious Eats, not Kenji. He doesn't much like baking
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 01:16 AM   #3
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 6,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Put a piece of bread in the container with the brown sugar and it will be fine.

Btw, that article was written by Stella Parks, the baking expert at Serious Eats, not Kenji. He doesn't much like baking
That's what I do too, for as little as I use brown sugar. It keeps it soft and fresh for quite a long time. After a few months the slice of bread has to be replaced.
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 05:22 AM   #4
Sous Chef
 
Silversage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Florida
Posts: 863
First, there is a difference between caramel and molasses. The SE article is referring to making caramel. Brown sugar contains molasses.

Unless you are buying turbinado, demerara, or moscavado sugar, you are probably not buying what you think you are. Commercially manufactured brown sugar is simply a very fine white sugar with some molasses added back to it. If you don't want to keep it on hand, just keep a bottle of molasses in the pantry.

One tablespoon of molasses plus one cup of white sugar is the equivalent of one cup of brown sugar. This is not just a substitution - it's the actual equivalent - it's how brown sugar is made.
__________________
In our house, dog hair is a condiment!
OMG! I decided to blog!
Silversage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 01:10 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silversage View Post
First, there is a difference between caramel and molasses. The SE article is referring to making caramel. Brown sugar contains molasses.

Unless you are buying turbinado, demerara, or moscavado sugar, you are probably not buying what you think you are. Commercially manufactured brown sugar is simply a very fine white sugar with some molasses added back to it. If you don't want to keep it on hand, just keep a bottle of molasses in the pantry.

One tablespoon of molasses plus one cup of white sugar is the equivalent of one cup of brown sugar. This is not just a substitution - it's the actual equivalent - it's how brown sugar is made.
I don't think we have turbinado sugar here but we have demerara, which is the real mcoy, but we also have something called "London Demerara sugar" which is refined (white) sugar with molasses added to make it look brown. I always try to buy unrefined "brown" sugars, whichever type I need - better taste - better for you - better results in cakes, etc..
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 01:13 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
I don't think we have turbinado sugar here but we have demerara, which is the real mcoy, but we also have something called "London Demerara sugar" which is refined (white) sugar with molasses added to make it look brown. I always try to buy unrefined "brown" sugars, whichever type I need - better taste - better for you - better results in cakes, etc..
Sugar is sugar. Brown sugar is not measurably better for you.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 01:18 PM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,165
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Sugar is sugar. Brown sugar is not measurably better for you.
No, it isn't but unrefined sugar has to be better than the refined white suff with all the guts take out of it.

I only buy cane sugar because beet sugar doesn't taste as good.

And I'm going to be contentious here - in my experience, jam made with beet sugar doesn't set as well as that made with cane sugar.
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 01:21 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
No, it isn't but unrefined sugar has to be better than the refined white suff with all the guts take out of it.

I only buy cane sugar because beet sugar doesn't taste as good.

And I'm going to be contentious here - in my experience, jam made with beet sugar doesn't set as well as that made with cane sugar.
No, it doesn't "have" to be, and it's not. I like the flavor of brown sugar, too, but it's not healthy by any means.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 01:52 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,277
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
No, it isn't but unrefined sugar has to be better than the refined white suff with all the guts take out of it. .
"So is the raw stuff really more virtuous? Sugar in the Raw could not be reached for comment, but a spokeswoman for the Wholesome Sweeteners brand of raw sugar explained to me that, like refined sugar, raw—technically called Turbinado—sugar comes from sugarcane (refined sugar can also be derived from beets). The main difference between the two is in the boiling of the cane juice: The juice for refined sugar is boiled several times to remove all the molasses, whereas Turbinado sugar is boiled only once.

The residual molasses gives Turbinado sugar "some flavor and texture other than just sweetness," says Katherine Zeratski, a registered dietitian with Mayo Clinic. But it doesn't provide any significant nutrition. Refined and raw sugar are "calorically identical," Zeratski notes. And while Turbinado sugar does contain calcium, iron, and potassium, it contains them in trace amounts.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 03:42 PM   #10
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Seattle
Posts: 185
I will try the bread trick, and I always have blackstrap molasses on hand, so I'll try the brown sugar "recipe" given above. From the description, I believe I grew up eating "London Demerara" - large "brown" crystals that when quickly rinsed, turn white? After dipping a spoon in the bowl, the grains took minutes to stop moving, allowing my nasty big sisters to convince me it was covered in "bugs," so they could have my share.

Also, thanks to Silversage for pointing out that caramel and molasses are completely different things: duh! From the comments, commercial brown sugar sounds rather like commercial "whole-wheat" flour: a reconstructed facsimile only vaguely like the original.

The reason I need the sugar to keep for a long time is that I only use it when cooking. Other than that, my sugar intake is zero. Yes, I know that processed foods and sodas and so on have tons of added sugar slipped into to them, but I have no interest in those things.

In closing, I think the "brown sugar is healthier" nonsense dates from the '70s, when everything brown was held to be morally superior to white (and giving me a lifelong prejudice against brown rice that I've only now managed to get over).
__________________

__________________
outRIAAge is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
granulated sugar, other, sugar

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.