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Old 11-08-2011, 01:25 AM   #21
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I agree absolutely!

My background was originally as a chemical engineer so I have turened the kitchen into a laboratory on actually too many occasions. Eg - I am the one posting about trying yeast in place of BP/BS. etc etc - but that has mostly been a winner.

And I was sincere about being glad you found the maple syrup.

It's just that the empirical results of trying to correct burned vegetables have been very poor. (I too often go off to another room and have left the heat too high too long - even with the diffuser)

I've been referring to burned taste with vegetables - I've found that one can overblast meat to almost anything and it will still be edible - even almost to the point of ashes -

And as I said - if one has left the stuff on heat so where it's been bubbling and simmering a while above the burnt crust - the bitter taste will have pervaded to the point it's damn difficult to overcome.

Generally a 'too much' correction is a difficult nut to crack - especially with salt, sugar,habanero-type chili etc. - only doubling, tripling quantities tends to work.

Trying is indeed fun - and serendipity has its rewards - but often the result is a flush and a grilled cheese sandwich
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Old 11-08-2011, 08:19 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpe View Post
I agree absolutely!

My background was originally as a chemical engineer so I have turened the kitchen into a laboratory on actually too many occasions. Eg - I am the one posting about trying yeast in place of BP/BS. etc etc - but that has mostly been a winner.

And I was sincere about being glad you found the maple syrup.

It's just that the empirical results of trying to correct burned vegetables have been very poor. (I too often go off to another room and have left the heat too high too long - even with the diffuser)

I've been referring to burned taste with vegetables - I've found that one can overblast meat to almost anything and it will still be edible - even almost to the point of ashes -

And as I said - if one has left the stuff on heat so where it's been bubbling and simmering a while above the burnt crust - the bitter taste will have pervaded to the point it's damn difficult to overcome.

Generally a 'too much' correction is a difficult nut to crack - especially with salt, sugar,habanero-type chili etc. - only doubling, tripling quantities tends to work.

Trying is indeed fun - and serendipity has its rewards - but often the result is a flush and a grilled cheese sandwich
Been there, done that. My worst cae of ruined food due to the above mentioned "too high, too long, was out of the room" scenario involved a frying pan, calves liver, tomato sauce, and seasonings. As you said, most meats burn fairly well. This is not true of liver and tomato. The house was filled with the most terrible odor. I never could get the bad odor/flavor out of the pan. I had to toss not only the food, but the pan as well. The worst part is, I burned food for the same reasons later on.

I rarely leave the kitchen anymore until the meal is done, or at least set a timer or two. I guess I did eventually learn enough to avoid that mistake, at least most of the time.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 11-08-2011, 08:29 AM   #23
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One other think you can try - if you have the patience - usually the burnt part has "skinned"...if you carefully sift through the sauce you can find that and remove it - that helps a little. Also, if you make it a bit more spicy - maybe with hot sauce or even more garlic, or my favorite to use when making spaghetti is a korean ketchup-type sauce that has ketchup and sweet chili. I have been told that putting a potato into a soup or sauce will absorb excess spices...not sure about burnt taste though. Obviously...i have done this myself...a few times actually. Now I usually use a crock pot to cook it in. I don't have a good heavy simmering pan.
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Old 11-08-2011, 01:13 PM   #24
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I am glad that you didn't dump it. If you don't scrape the bottom part out of the pan, it usually works, as you found out. I usually add a dash of cinnamon to my sauce instead of sugar.
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