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Old 10-26-2012, 12:40 PM   #11
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If you use a lot of honey, know your honey. It's a dirty business, apparently dirtier than the Corleone's olive oil business. (Actually, the olive oil business is pretty shady.)

The short version is that so much Asian honey is chemically contaminated that the Chinese scheme is to ultrafilter it to remove pollen so that the country of origin can't be tested and to then tranship it through another country where it will be labeled Product of _______. Singapore suddenly became a major honey producer. They have no bees. When inspectors get onto one tranship point, they shift to another. Insiders consider the big criminal honey players to be like major drug lords, too big for government to deal with. There's a term for it: Honey Laundering.

If you randomly buy honey in a grocery store, you have a better than 75% chance of buying contraband honey, meaning it's been ultrafiltered, there being no other good reason to do that but to conceal where it's from. If you buy at Walgreens or CVS, 100% will be mystery honey. Same for the small packages at fast food joints. Honey sold in genuine, well-managed farmers markets, where the local sourcing is verified, always have the full amount of pollens. But in less well policed markets it can be Chinese honey in a cute local jar.

And of course, all this is in addition to the more obvious adulteration by stretching with HFCS and other sweeteners.

So, the labeled county of origin is no help. Packers like to stay ignorant of where their honey comes from. Known local sources are about the only reasonable assurance.
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Old 10-26-2012, 03:06 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLC View Post
If you use a lot of honey, know your honey. It's a dirty business, apparently dirtier than the Corleone's olive oil business. (Actually, the olive oil business is pretty shady.)

The short version is that so much Asian honey is chemically contaminated that the Chinese scheme is to ultrafilter it to remove pollen so that the country of origin can't be tested and to then tranship it through another country where it will be labeled Product of _______. Singapore suddenly became a major honey producer. They have no bees. When inspectors get onto one tranship point, they shift to another. Insiders consider the big criminal honey players to be like major drug lords, too big for government to deal with. There's a term for it: Honey Laundering.

If you randomly buy honey in a grocery store, you have a better than 75% chance of buying contraband honey, meaning it's been ultrafiltered, there being no other good reason to do that but to conceal where it's from. If you buy at Walgreens or CVS, 100% will be mystery honey. Same for the small packages at fast food joints. Honey sold in genuine, well-managed farmers markets, where the local sourcing is verified, always have the full amount of pollens. But in less well policed markets it can be Chinese honey in a cute local jar.

And of course, all this is in addition to the more obvious adulteration by stretching with HFCS and other sweeteners.

So, the labeled county of origin is no help. Packers like to stay ignorant of where their honey comes from. Known local sources are about the only reasonable assurance.
Nice summary of the pitfalls and foibles of the honey industry.
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Old 10-26-2012, 03:33 PM   #13
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If you want to bake with it, make baklava or honey cake.

Also, this is really good:
Baked Bananas with Honey and Lime:
2 medium unpeeled firm ripe bananas
1 Tbsp honey, or more to taste
1 Tbsp plus 1 tsp. fresh lime juice

Preheat oven to 350 F. Line baking pan with foil.
Place bananas in pan, and bake about 20 minutes, or until skin is golden brown and bananas are soft. Cool 5 minutes.
Make lengthwise cut through skin, drain, then remove skin.
Mix honey and lime juice together and drizzle over bananas.
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Old 10-26-2012, 04:19 PM   #14
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As a child, we used to go to the cranbery bogs, pick a handful of ripe berries, then go to the beehive, peel back a corner of the honey, pop the berries in our mouth and suck out the honey right from the comb. Today, I HATE honey. the last time I bought some was more than 35 years ago at the Washingto State Fair from a local farmer. I made oatmal bread with it.
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Old 11-13-2012, 01:24 PM   #15
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As referenced above, all honey is not equal! I recommend finding a local producer, maybe at a farmer's market in your area. That is also the best way to find different types and flavors.

I love using my local honey in quick BBQ sauces to add a little depth of flavor. I use it with pork at least once a week in marinade. With some soy sauce, vinegar, garlic and ginger it makes a wonderful marinade or sauce to cook a pork roast in the slow cooker. I love honey with apples so I will sweeten a crisp with it and save the brown sugar for the crumb topping. It's been mentioned, but I love honey with plain yogurt. I cannot stand vanilla or fruit flavored yogurt, so I always buy plain and drizzle a little honey on top.
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Old 11-13-2012, 01:33 PM   #16
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I have a friend who's husband is in the honey business and she sells it at the local Farmers Market. I'll print this info out for her honey stand...it should help with sales. Thank you.
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Old 11-25-2012, 12:03 PM   #17
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I also have a jar of honey, lemon & ginger slices. Which help with colds, marinades, and is great as a stand alone hot drink. If the cold is bad, I'll also add a slice of chilli. It never lasts long in my house
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Old 12-31-2012, 10:13 AM   #18
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There's someone local that's got a sign out which reads: ORGANIC HONEY FOR SALE
I assume all those little honey bees are careful not to land on a plant that's not being grown in 'organic soil'. LOL
We got a jar for Christmas from a fancy resort that has it's own honey bees.
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Old 01-02-2013, 06:03 AM   #19
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I like to use Manuka honey . I use it very simply, in porridge and on toast .
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Old 01-02-2013, 12:40 PM   #20
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Lucky for me, local honey is easy to find around here. There is a guy that has a truck set up outside the Walmart all of the time.
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