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Old 01-10-2013, 09:11 AM   #21
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Tupelo honey is good but in my opinion there's no other honey that compares with sourwood honey from the Appalachian region of the US. If you ever get a chance to try it, don't pass it up.

"Iím going to break one of the rules of the trade here. Iím going to tell you some of the secrets of improvisation. Just remember ó itís always a good idea to follow the directions exactly the first time you try a recipe. But from then on, youíre on your own." - James Beard
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Old 01-10-2013, 10:52 PM   #22
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I use honey whenever I want to make drinks and also use some of them when making frosting :)

General Info:

Honey is good because it

- Only needs to be consumed less as it is sweeter than sugar
- Honey has a healthier GI; the lower the rating is, the slower the sugar is absorbed into bloodstream and hence a healthier digestive process
- Honey contains nutrition and minerals

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Old 01-11-2013, 12:06 AM   #23
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OK. First of all, I heard somewhere that using local honey could be good for allergies. My husband used to suffer (not so much any more)(probably just age, won't swear to honey), but, in fact, I met a gal who is a beekeeper, living maybe a mile from me, and buy my honey from her.

Neither my husband nor I have a sweet tooth, but when it is appropriate, I sweeten with my friends' honey.

It is said (may be old wives' tales) that using the honey that is raised as close to where you live is best, especially if you have allergies (kind of like giving yourself a bit of a vaccination). Who knows?

Probably my favorite use for honey is when one of us has a cold. Mom raised me on ginger tea when we were sick. A heaping teaspoon of ground ginger, boiling water, sugar, and milk. I hated milk (still do), so she ommitted that. I now make it as a cold remedy with honey instead of sugar. It really is a wonderful comfort remedy.

I like to take mayo, a very small dab of Dijon mustard, and honey and make a dip or sauce that is especially good dribbled over asparagus, or, especially, a dipping sauce for a whole artichoke. This makes a good sauce for a lot of foods, but those are my favorites.
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:54 AM   #24
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Dad has horrible pollen allergies. When he was traveling for work, he would order a jar of local honey from his destination point and start eating it a week before he had to be there. This helped him greatly over the years, hew swears by it for folks who have pollen allergies. He lived in Wyoming and Colorado and traveled every where in the states and to England a couple of times.
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:31 PM   #25
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Location: Yuma, AZ
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Interesting to see this thread resurface. So far as I can tell it is based on an article in the Food Safety News, "Tests Show Most Store Honey Isn't Honey", from 110711. I remember it because I used it in a rhetoric exercise with BGD, entitled, "how to mislead while telling the truth". The publisher of FSN is Bill Marler, a peronal injury and food borne illness attorney, so at least we know where he is coming from. Without going into boring details, though, you might want to consider how much local bee keepers would charge for their "homegrown honey" if they were the sole providers of honey in the US. :)
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Old 01-12-2013, 08:55 PM   #26
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Local honey is great for allergies. I put it in my green tea to help with mine.
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Old 01-13-2013, 12:45 PM   #27
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IF possible I try & use honey in place of white sugar,
It is wonderful when after chicken thighs,legs,etc are fully cooked spread honey all over them................turn OFF the oven & put your pan back in for 5 or 10 minutes while you get everything else on the table.........

I also put a wee bit of honey in my corn muffin batter...and sprinkle brown sugar over the tops before baking
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Old 01-13-2013, 01:22 PM   #28
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I like to add it to drained ricotta along with either dry or fresh berries it's wonderful.

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