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Old 06-01-2007, 12:00 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
What elevates a pan fried steak to the level of "Steak Diane" is the sauce ... and the brandy or cognac is as important as the Worcestershire sauce for the distinctive flavor that makes this dish what it is.

As Uncle Bob said, Google on the phrase "steak diane recipe" and you will find some that do not use alcohol. They are, however, totally different from the ones that do.

IMHO - without those distinctive flavors of brandy and Worcestershire sauce in the sauce it is just a pan fried steak with "a sauce" - not Steak Diane! It would be like chopping up some iceberg lettuce, throwing in a handful of croûtons and dousing it in Bacon flavored Ranch Dressing and calling it a Caesar Salad.
You have a very good point, Michael. But how can you explain the fact that the Coca-Cola recipe has changed over its history of 121 years?
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Old 06-01-2007, 04:45 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Marcus
You have a very good point, Michael. But how can you explain the fact that the Coca-Cola recipe has changed over its history of 121 years?
Simple Marcus - US Federal Drug Regulations were imposed which took the Coca out of Coca-Cola recipe. However, this thread is about "Steak Diane" ... if you would like to discuss a different topic- please start a new thread.
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Old 06-01-2007, 04:51 PM   #13
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If you're going for a French-style dish, I would recommend doing a Steak au Poivre or Steak Oscar, both of which can be done without alcohol. If you do not want alcohol in the dish, you may as well forget about doing the Steak Diane.
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Old 06-01-2007, 05:16 PM   #14
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I am not going to forget about doing the steak, and quit calling me Diane!
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Old 06-01-2007, 05:47 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Simple Marcus - US Federal Drug Regulations were imposed which took the Coca out of Coca-Cola recipe. However, this thread is about "Steak Diane" ... if you would like to discuss a different topic- please start a new thread.
It really doesn't matter much to me. Whatever way you prepare it, steak is steak. It doesn't have to be a Steak Diane if you don't intend it to be.

However, take a hamburger for instance. A true hamburger is ground beef to many, but Emeril Lagasse has made a hamburger with ground pork and chorizo on one of his shows. According to one account, the authentic hamburger sandwich has two slices of bread without the ketchup and mustard, but times have changed, yet they still call it a hamburger, with or without the works. It's just like taking the Coca out of Coca-Cola, yet the name sticks.

Forgive me for getting off topic. I just don't want to see another thread posted as an outgrowth of a previous thread.
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Old 06-01-2007, 06:49 PM   #16
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I think there are several answers here, but I have to wonder why the poster wanted the recipe.

Were it to make a dish for someone who just adores steak Dianne, then to serve a steak without the classical ingredients and call it steak Dianne might prove a disappointment. So my advice would be make a steak with any sauce she wishes but demur from tacking on Dianne's moniker.

Have had classical recipes served to me in a restaurant that missed the mark by a whole lot. When I questioned the waiter about the dish have generally been told that is their version of the dish.

Phooey, if I want steak Dianne I want steak Dianne, not some chef's fanciful steak creation that bears little or no relation to the original version.

If the chef wants to call it steak Jack, call it that. But leave Dianne alone.

Alternatively, as another scenario, if the poster had tried steak Dianne, perhaps in a restaurant, loved it, but then wantied to make it for herself, but preferred to shun the alcohol, then I would say give the substitutes a go.

It may not be the Dianne McCoy, but she might find it acceptable or even delicious.

Just my take on things.
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Old 06-01-2007, 08:05 PM   #17
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I think there are several answers here, but I have to wonder why the poster wanted the recipe.

Were it to make a dish for someone who just adores steak Dianne, then to serve a steak without the classical ingredients and call it steak Dianne might prove a disappointment. So my advice would be make a steak with any sauce she wishes but demur from tacking on Dianne's moniker.

Have had classical recipes served to me in a restaurant that missed the mark by a whole lot. When I questioned the waiter about the dish have generally been told that is their version of the dish.

Phooey, if I want steak Dianne I want steak Dianne, not some chef's fanciful steak creation that bears little or no relation to the original version.

If the chef wants to call it steak Jack, call it that. But leave Dianne alone.

Alternatively, as another scenario, if the poster had tried steak Dianne, perhaps in a restaurant, loved it, but then wantied to make it for herself, but preferred to shun the alcohol, then I would say give the substitutes a go.

It may not be the Dianne McCoy, but she might find it acceptable or even delicious.

Just my take on things.
You said it, Dot. Again, it doesn't really matter to me. The alcohol burns off after you cook it. Take a look at penne alla vodka. I don't drink alcohol, but I think penne alla vodka is delicious.
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Old 06-01-2007, 08:28 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Marcus
The alcohol burns off after you cook it.
Actually this is incorrect. Unless you cook it for a very very long time, the alcohol is still present. Even if you flambe, a surprising amount of alcohol remains.
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Old 06-01-2007, 08:31 PM   #19
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A great Steak Diane is one of my all-time favorite entrees. I just love it and, when it's prepared in the traditional way, it's nothing short of heaven.

I'd be hard put to eliminate the alcoholic ingredients if I was preparing it for someone who truly enjoys this dish.
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Old 06-01-2007, 08:32 PM   #20
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I wanted to make steak dianne because I had it when I was younger and loved it. It's actually in a healthy recipe book that I own. I'm trying to lose weight and wanted to make some nice food as well. But I just simply dont have the money to buy the alcohol for the recipe. Well I have no idea how much brandy costs or red wine for that matter. I only really drink pre mixed drinks, and so I was just hoping to omit the alcohol for the sake of money. However, as it seems to be such a big part of the recipe, I'll check out the local liquor store next time I'm down town to see if I can get a small bottle or something. :D. Thanks for your time though guys. I appreciate it.
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