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Old 10-28-2006, 01:38 AM   #21
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Crisco should freeze at about -4 to -10 F (-20 to -23.5 C) or a little lower. But freezing will not stop it from going rancid, but if properly packaged can retard the oxydation rate.

Put the room temp Crisco in "freezer" grade plastic bags and squeeze out as much air as you can (to remove as much of the oxygen as possible) and then seal. This is basically a 2-point chemical reaction - oxydation requires oxygen and heat - the more you can remove of both, the slower the reaction. This will not stop oxydation (fat going rancid) but it will retard it a bit. Sorry scott123 - Crisco doesn't defy oxydation - it simply retards it due to hydrogenation ... which is where Trans Fats come into play - and gets into a chemistry discussion we've already had.

Now - as for substituting butter for shortening ... yeah, you could - if you're willing to accept the changes in texture. Butter has a low (and very narrow range) melting point - shortening has a higher broader range melting point. In something like cookies - replacing the shorting with butter in a cookie recipe will result in a cookie that spreads more, is dryer, flatter, and crisper. In cakes - it can mean a difference in the moistness, texture and tenderness of the crumb. In something like a pie crust - if you want both flakey and tender - you need both butter and shortening.
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Old 10-28-2006, 02:44 AM   #22
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Thanks, Michael in FtW,

Your explanation on the differences between using butter Vs shortening makes a lot of sense-----and I guess that is why bacon (which is mostly fat) will even go rancid in the freezer eventually.
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Old 10-28-2006, 06:44 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Crisco should freeze at about -4 to -10 F (-20 to -23.5 C) or a little lower. But freezing will not stop it from going rancid, but if properly packaged can retard the oxydation rate.

Put the room temp Crisco in "freezer" grade plastic bags and squeeze out as much air as you can (to remove as much of the oxygen as possible) and then seal. This is basically a 2-point chemical reaction - oxydation requires oxygen and heat - the more you can remove of both, the slower the reaction. This will not stop oxydation (fat going rancid) but it will retard it a bit. Sorry scott123 - Crisco doesn't defy oxydation - it simply retards it due to hydrogenation ... which is where Trans Fats come into play - and gets into a chemistry discussion we've already had.

Now - as for substituting butter for shortening ... yeah, you could - if you're willing to accept the changes in texture. Butter has a low (and very narrow range) melting point - shortening has a higher broader range melting point. In something like cookies - replacing the shorting with butter in a cookie recipe will result in a cookie that spreads more, is dryer, flatter, and crisper. In cakes - it can mean a difference in the moistness, texture and tenderness of the crumb. In something like a pie crust - if you want both flakey and tender - you need both butter and shortening.


Your suggestion on "freezer" bags for Crisco also brings to mind vacuum seal bags, which would get all of the air out of the bag first, then seal it up tightly.

Since air is the chief cause of food spoilage, and opens the door for mold, mildew and other spores to thrive, I think the vacuum seal bags will also prolong the life of Crisco in the freezer.

Hydrogenation is also a process used in making oleomargarine. The veggie oil that's in it. Health analysts have diagnosed it to be very unhealthy, and suggest moderate use.

Butter, on the other hand, has animal fat and must also be used in moderation. But with butter, you get that pleasent buttery taste - something that you just can't get with margarine!


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Old 10-28-2006, 07:35 PM   #24
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I'd humbly suggest you do not freeze Crisco. Use it up , leave it out in your closet, and leave valuable refrigerator space for important things, like lobster tails, giant shrimp, sashimi-quality tuna and smoked salmon.

Not EVERYTHING needs to be frozen - only perishable goods.

FYI - I've had a tub of Crisco in my closet for 6 weeks. Room temperature. I used some on Friday, and it was fine.
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Old 10-29-2006, 10:50 AM   #25
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Dear Clive,

Can I please send my refrigerator/freezer to your place? I would love to load up on the lobster tails, giant shrimp, sashimi, quality tuna, smoked salmon, etc., if I could find it here (Kazahstan) without giving up my first born children. Ha!!!!!! You wouldn't believe the prices of seafood here. Dining out is very expensive. Crisco is not to be found here or any solid shortening for that matter that I know of. We are only allowed so many trips out of the country so what we bring in basically has to last about 6 months to a year depending where you go.
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Old 10-29-2006, 02:38 PM   #26
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I too am a butter fan when it comes to baking. I wondered
how long Crisco lasts.... guess I better toss mine... well over
a year or 2 old. thanks for all the info
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Old 10-29-2006, 04:03 PM   #27
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**** yeah!!! You're welcome!

When I make the 7-up cake or any other, I DO NOT substitute it. You just can't get that same great buttery taste in baked goods with margarine!!

Same with vanilla and lemon extracts. There is just no cutting corners and going to cheap flimsy products when it comes to baking cakes and cookies!!!

Julia Child NEVER used the fake stuff either! She once said that if you're going to cook or bake anything at all, use only the finest ingredients.


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Old 10-29-2006, 04:04 PM   #28
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spread a little bit of crisco on a soda biscuit. You'll soon know if it's rancid. Don't chuck it out till you're sure!!
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Old 10-29-2006, 11:36 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
So if my sour cream is beyond the expiration date, I should just scoop out the green and blue fuzzy parts and use the rest?
Are you really getting green and blue fuzz on your old sour cream? The first time you open it?

How often do you clean your fridge?
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Old 10-29-2006, 11:48 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Sorry scott123 - Crisco doesn't defy oxydation - it simply retards it due to hydrogenation ... which is where Trans Fats come into play - and gets into a chemistry discussion we've already had.
Sorry Michael, but I didn't say that Crisco never goes rancid.

The American Heritage Dictionary defines 'defy' as:

Quote:
To oppose or resist with boldness and assurance
Hydrogenated oil boldly resists oxydation. If stored in a cool, dark place, it's good for at least a year, probably two. No, it's not forever, but within the perspective of the age span of other oils/fats, a year or two is a very long time.

If someone is purchasing crisco and lettting it sit around for years, maybe they should ask themselves if they really needed to purchase it in the first place.
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