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Old 10-13-2012, 04:37 PM   #11
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I would think that there would be a botulism risk doing this.
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Old 10-13-2012, 05:09 PM   #12
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The jars seal. It's "canned".
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Old 10-13-2012, 10:34 PM   #13
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My mother-in-law told about her step mother canning every thing. She never once mentioned that she wanted to try to reproduce the taste and even said she was so thankful that in modern times she had a freezer. She even talked about canned chickens. Just thinking about it, I had to agree with her.
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Old 10-14-2012, 12:16 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chopper View Post
The jars seal. It's "canned".
Yes they do, and yes it is, but if there are any botulism bugs in the jar when it is sealed and canned, they will continue to grow unless the jar is kept in the freezer, in which case, all that hard work spent in sealing the jars is something of a waste time. I hope that the many experienced canners on this forum will forgive me for stating such basic information, but here's how it works.
Clostridium botulinum thrives on both animal and plant tissue (it loves asparagus!) and is anaerobic, so it can live in an oxygen free environment. One thing that will kill it is an acid environment. I believe that C. botulinum cannot live at a pH below 4.6, and when we make high acid jams and such (yum) the pH is probably closer to 4.0.
Unfortunately, some other nasties are not deterred by the low pH and so we subject them to the temperature of boiling water in a water bath for ten minutes. A weak spot on the lid pops down as the contents of the jar cool and contract, and the bottle is "sealed" or "canned. Unfortunately, this temp (212F) alone is not enough to kill the botulism bugs, so if the contents of the canning jar are not highly acidic, they will thrive. What will kill them is the high pressure, high temperature produced in a pressure cooker. Sparrowgrass already gave us a link with the government's figures for this.
But of course, if there are no botulism organisms in the jar when it is sealed, you won't get the disease. Perhaps because so few people can anything but jam these days, the national incidence of botulism is very low, less than 30 persons per anum, I believe. A third of those, however, are from Alaska, where, my late wife told me, the Inuit would thaw frozen meat and then freeze what was left for next time. I saw one case in London over fifty years ago. The patient was a Goanese seaman, and everyone thought that he must have an exotic tropical disease. Unfortunately, by the time that they discovered their mistake, he had died in great distress, so I am very careful about the handling and preparation of canned foods!
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Old 10-14-2012, 08:24 AM   #15
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I too grew up on a farm. Every fall, AFTER the corn was done picking there was no sitting around, like if it didn't freeze yet some late fall plowing could be done... Then my dad and his cousin would help each other. Butcher a beef and a hawg at each other's. These were all day affairs for each and us little kids had to help too. Mom wrapped the meat cuts in butcher paper as it was ready and us kids carted it off to the chest freezer. After the freezer got full, then we loaded up the back of the pick up with bushel baskets and hauled the meat into town to the "meat locker" at the meat market ( we must have rented space) for storage.

At the end, mom, made lard and I know Gramma taught her to pack sausage into crocks that were kept in the cellar. Our cellar was cold. I forget what else she made, head cheese, boiled. And she made good lard pie crusts all year.

Now adays, it's hard just to find a good package of lard that hasn't been fortified with chemicals for shelf storage.
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Old 10-14-2012, 09:10 AM   #16
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The jars seal. It's "canned".
Home canned food is the most common cause of botulism poisoning.

And botulism used to be called "sausage disease"

Sort of a double whammy.
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Old 10-14-2012, 11:54 AM   #17
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A link to info on botulism:

Botulism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 10-14-2012, 12:15 PM   #18
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I've seen Vienna sausages in a can, but I wouldn't ever consider eating them.
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Old 10-14-2012, 12:21 PM   #19
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It isn't like I am going to do this myself, so you folks needn't worry about me getting sick. I was just talking about the jars at my grandparents farm in the pantry. I'm not even sure if we ate them or not. I don't remember. ;)
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Old 10-14-2012, 02:02 PM   #20
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I've seen Vienna sausages in a can, but I wouldn't ever consider eating them.
Not a fan of mechanically separated chicken?
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