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Old 11-07-2013, 11:49 AM   #111
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hungarian goulash seems to be another dish that has been messed about with,as has stroganoff,imho.one is a quick cook dish,the other is long & slow.what they have in common is that they both have a few,simple,ingredients.goulash is a peasant dish with it's roots in hungary/the balkans.stewing beef or,as in serbia & croatia wild boar,onions,garlic,oil,sweet & hot paprika,tomatoes,water or stock,caraway,sour cream,salt & pepper.in other words ingredients that were readily available and/or relatively cheap.traditionally served over wide,flat noodles or potatoes or dumplings
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Old 11-07-2013, 12:27 PM   #112
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hungarian goulash seems to be another dish that has been messed about with,as has stroganoff,imho.one is a quick cook dish,the other is long & slow.what they have in common is that they both have a few,simple,ingredients.goulash is a peasant dish with it's roots in hungary/the balkans.stewing beef or,as in serbia & croatia wild boar,onions,garlic,oil,sweet & hot paprika,tomatoes,water or stock,caraway,sour cream,salt & pepper.in other words ingredients that were readily available and/or relatively cheap.traditionally served over wide,flat noodles or potatoes or dumplings

That is how my mother made it. I think she made it with a small amount of meat and a large amount of potatoes or noodles as she had little money to feed her family. She was a good cook considering what she had to work with. I was not allowed in her kitchen except to eat. I think she was afraid if I learned to cook I wouldn't need her anymore. So I didn't learn any cooking skills from her.
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Old 11-07-2013, 01:04 PM   #113
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That is how my mother made it. I think she made it with a small amount of meat and a large amount of potatoes or noodles as she had little money to feed her family. She was a good cook considering what she had to work with. I was not allowed in her kitchen except to eat. I think she was afraid if I learned to cook I wouldn't need her anymore. So I didn't learn any cooking skills from her.
My exDIL was born in Naples, Italy. Her family came here when she was seven. Her mother is a great cook. But she refused to let any of her five daughters in the kitchen. As a result, my son ate more at the MIL's house than at home. As did the DIL and their two sons. None of her daughters knew how to cook when they got married.
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Old 11-07-2013, 01:47 PM   #114
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That is how my mother made it. I think she made it with a small amount of meat and a large amount of potatoes or noodles as she had little money to feed her family. She was a good cook considering what she had to work with. I was not allowed in her kitchen except to eat. I think she was afraid if I learned to cook I wouldn't need her anymore. So I didn't learn any cooking skills from her.
i'm sure that is how she cooked it carol.cooked true to it's roots...a peasant dish,light on meat & heavy on potatoes or noodles.my family tree has many branches.my lineage goes from russia,through poland,down to the balkans & up through austria & france,with a touch of israel thrown in!!.not a drop of british blood in my body but lots of relatives from lots of countries who shared one passion...food!that's exactly how we cooked it too!!what on earth worcestershire sauce is doing in a recipe for a dish that had been cooked for centuries before said condiment was invented simply beggars belief!!
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Old 11-07-2013, 01:55 PM   #115
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I think she was afraid if I learned to cook I wouldn't need her anymore. So I didn't learn any cooking skills from her.
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None of her daughters knew how to cook when they got married.
i think this is more of a hierachy thing ladies.who IS queen of the pride or queen of the hive??.daughters learning to cook represented a threat to the throne!!
different with sons i think.mum was an amazing cook.she could outcook bolas & i put together without drawing breath.mum taught us to cook before we could read.wanted us to be independant chaps & fly the nest asap too,no doubt!!
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Old 11-07-2013, 02:03 PM   #116
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There is always discussion about what an"authentic" recipe is for a dish. If you take a "representative" recipe for goulash that is generally accepted and change one ingredient, is it still goulash? What if you add an ingredient or two, is it still goulash?

When someone insists their recipe is the only authentic recipe for a dish that was in general use across a region, I tend to pay little attention.

I don't write this to demean various recipes. Rather to point out that there are many viable versions.
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Old 11-07-2013, 02:13 PM   #117
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There is always discussion about what an"authentic" recipe is for a dish. If you take a "representative" recipe for goulash that is generally accepted and change one ingredient, is it still goulash? What if you add an ingredient or two, is it still goulash?

When someone insists their recipe is the only authentic recipe for a dish that was in general use across a region, I tend to pay little attention.

I don't write this to demean various recipes. Rather to point out that there are many viable versions.
absolutely right andy,the reality is that no one knows what the original ingredients of any dish truly were or how it was cooked.recipes have been adapted to what's available & cooking methods have changed over the millenia.apart,maybe,for that first chunk of meat that was chucked on a fire thousands of years ago.but what meat was it and how long was it on the fire???
i think it is true to say that the further you go back,the closer you get to the original.one thing i am certain of is that worcestershire sauce,wonderful though it surely is,has no place in a goulash!!
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Old 11-07-2013, 03:30 PM   #118
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i'm sure that is how she cooked it carol.cooked true to it's roots...a peasant dish,light on meat & heavy on potatoes or noodles.my family tree has many branches.my lineage goes from russia,through poland,down to the balkans & up through austria & france,with a touch of israel thrown in!!.not a drop of british blood in my body but lots of relatives from lots of countries who shared one passion...food!that's exactly how we cooked it too!!what on earth worcestershire sauce is doing in a recipe for a dish that had been cooked for centuries before said condiment was invented simply beggars belief!!
Goulash probably predates the use of tomatoes as food in Europe too.
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Old 11-07-2013, 03:47 PM   #119
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There is always discussion about what an"authentic" recipe is for a dish. If you take a "representative" recipe for goulash that is generally accepted and change one ingredient, is it still goulash? What if you add an ingredient or two, is it still goulash?

When someone insists their recipe is the only authentic recipe for a dish that was in general use across a region, I tend to pay little attention.

I don't write this to demean various recipes. Rather to point out that there are many viable versions.
When I hear the words "peasant dish" I expect to see very little meat. Meat was a luxury for the peasants. So their dishes added veggie to stretch it to feel the whole family. And for areas around the Balkans, I expect to find cabbage also. It kept well and one head went a long way. It was a veggie that could be stored throughout the winter months along with the root veggies. Seasonings they had, although they may be expensive. But a little went a long way and made the dishes tasty. Many of their herbs were found in the wild.
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Old 11-07-2013, 04:08 PM   #120
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Goulash probably predates the use of tomatoes as food in Europe too.
Not to mention paprika, made from a pepper, which is also indigenous to South America.
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