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Old 11-07-2013, 07:13 PM   #131
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I was just reading some of the recipes and one calls for a "Faggot of Sweet-herbs and parsley."
Interesting, we had a word before we started calling it a "bouquet garnie".
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Old 11-08-2013, 04:18 AM   #132
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Being endlessly curious about food and history, this is one of my favorite sites: The Food Timeline: history notes--soup
that is a cracking site gg!!bookmarked it for future reference mate!!
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Old 11-08-2013, 04:31 AM   #133
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Interesting, we had a word before we started calling it a "bouquet garnie".
the origins of words & sayings fascinates me too tax,as per gravy's thread on faggots.bundle of sticks/bundle of herbs....seems to make sense.i think that at one time the food faggot was wrapped in caul fat before cooking,hence bundle/package again? who knows eh?
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Old 11-12-2013, 05:26 PM   #134
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We're guessing it's older than that.

And I'm pretty sure that only the rich got tomatoes and peppers for quite a while after they were introduced to Europe.
Even at the beginning of the 20th century there were still people in England who believed tomatoes were poisonous, caused cancer, "inflamed the passions", etc., etc. One of my grandmothers, born in the 1890s never ate a tomato until she was in her 30s because she believed them to be poisonous. Thereafter she always ate them with sugar and (malt) vinegar because the sugar and vinegar warded of the "bad" effects.
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Old 11-12-2013, 06:01 PM   #135
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i'm sure that is how she cooked it carol.cooked true to it's roots...a peasant dish,light on meat & heavy on potatoes or noodles.my family tree has many branches.my lineage goes from russia,through poland,down to the balkans & up through austria & france,with a touch of israel thrown in!!.not a drop of british blood in my body but lots of relatives from lots of countries who shared one passion...food!that's exactly how we cooked it too!!what on earth worcestershire sauce is doing in a recipe for a dish that had been cooked for centuries before said condiment was invented simply beggars belief!!
Worcestershire sauce has very ancient antecedents in the garum and liquamen used by the ancient Greeks and Romans as far back as the 5th century BC. All involved fermented fish and all were used to improve the flavour of meat dishes.
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Old 11-12-2013, 06:17 PM   #136
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Worcestershire sauce has very ancient antecedents in the garum and liquamen used by the ancient Greeks and Romans as far back as the 5th century BC. All involved fermented fish and all were used to improve the flavour of meat dishes.

Interesting. I just read that Worcestershire sauce was based on a recipe for a savory sauce from India.
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Old 11-12-2013, 09:04 PM   #137
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Interesting. I just read that Worcestershire sauce was based on a recipe for a savory sauce from India.
I'm not surprised. It has tamarind as an ingredient.
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Old 11-17-2013, 08:20 PM   #138
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Interesting. I just read that Worcestershire sauce was based on a recipe for a savory sauce from India.
Well, yes. These things wandered round the world a bit. Ancient Greece to India isn't too great a leap when you consider that Alexander the Great got as far as modern Pakistan (which was part of India until partition in 1947). In fact the Indian connection for Lea & Perrins, who marketed the "original" Worcestershire sauce, is a bit tenuous. The Victorians where very good at writing advertising copy for their products!

There are fermented fish products all over the world from Scandinavia to Japan. Some more repellent than others. When I mentioned liquamen and garum I was pointing out that fermented fish based sauces had a very ancient background as Harry seemed to think that Worcestershire sauce was a modern aberration (it's nearly 200 years old).
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Old 11-18-2013, 03:57 AM   #139
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I was pointing out that fermented fish based sauces had a very ancient background as Harry seemed to think that Worcestershire sauce was a modern aberration (it's nearly 200 years old).
i am well aware of the ancient history/origins of fermented fish based sauces & the history of worcester sauce itself.if you read my post again,you will see that it was the use of worcester sauce in goulash that i found to be a modern aberration,not the sauce itself.that's my personal opinion/taste.
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