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Old 03-10-2012, 12:35 PM   #11
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I lived in Philly for quite a few years, and people in Philadelphia do NOT put Cheese Whiz on cheesesteaks. Onions on the griddle first, maybe some bell pepper, then shaved beef, often still frozen, on top of 'em. Turn and top with provolone, let melt. Serve on a 6" Italian torpedo roll, top with marinara. Cheese Whiz...aaaagghhhh!
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Old 03-10-2012, 12:37 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
Some cheesesteak places use cheese whiz, but the really good ones use provolone. If you absolutely have to have cheese whiz, try melting some Velveeta if that's available in GB or you can melt some American cheese slices. You know, the ones individually wrapped in plastic, stacked and sealed in cellophane? It's all the same processed cheese food in a different form.
I often think of those Japanese ginger candies wrapped in rice paper when I think of those Kraft celo-wrapped slices. The contents are as edible as the container.
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Old 03-10-2012, 06:01 PM   #13
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GLC - Kraft, that was it. When I was a child growing up in the groovy 70's I remember Kraft Cheddar Spread which came in a jar and it was orangey coloured and a weird texture, I am sure that was our version of cheese whiz.

Its long gone from our shelves now.
Kraft sells a variety of processed cheese and "cheese spread" products around he world.










Some are "processed." Some are "prepared," I assume to accord with local food terminology law.

Cheese Whiz appears to be the senior member of the tribe. In fact, it achieved something of the same kind of generic meaning as "coke" representing any cola soda. In The Blues Brothers, the old guy in the hotel asks Elwood, "Did you get my Cheez Whiz, boy?" Elwood tosses him a can, clearly an aerosol type can, something Cheese Whiz never came in. What Elwood tossed him was Kraft Easy Cheese.

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Old 03-10-2012, 06:57 PM   #14
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You can make a knock-off version by combining equal parts of American process cheese and evaporated milk in a double boiler with a little salt, mustard and Worcestershire sauce. Just heat and stir until all is melted.
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Old 03-10-2012, 07:05 PM   #15
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We get individual cheese slices, which my boys like on burgers. I'm not familiar with provolone or velveeta. Hmm cheese slices on nachos might work then?
You are not familiar with provolone? I assumed that this would be a pretty universally available cheese. It is an Italian slicing cheese, similar in texture to mozzarella but with its own distinct flavor and aged a bit more.
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Old 03-10-2012, 08:43 PM   #16
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We get individual cheese slices, which my boys like on burgers. I'm not familiar with provolone or velveeta. Hmm cheese slices on nachos might work then?
Try using grated cheddar cheese or a mix of cheddar and jack cheese for your nachos.

Calculate the price per pound of those individually wrapped cheese slices, then compare that to buying real cheese.

I had some friends who used to call Cheese Whiz "blowzo."

Velveeta makes good fish bait for trout, in the middle of the day when they're not biting flies and maybe skeptical about your worms. Added bonus: you can eat your bait while you're fishing. Perhaps Velveeta when lake fishing and worms when stream fishing. Don't forget where you are if you're nibbling on your own bait. It adds a whole new meaning to the term "with baited breath." Particularly if you get confused and you're fishing with worms...
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:36 AM   #17
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This has been very interesting for me, and learning so many new things!

Errrm sorry to be a pain but I don't know what "jack" cheese is either....
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:39 AM   #18
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I'm not a food snob. Yes, I use American cheese on burgers and sandwiches, if I don't have anything else on hand.
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Old 03-11-2012, 09:05 AM   #19
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Monterey Jack. (Note spelling. It's named for Monterey, California - not Monterrey, Mexico.) In the form encountered in grocery stores, not a very sophisticated cow's milk, semi-hard white cheese, supposedly developed by Franciscan Friars in California. Not aged much, maybe one month. A hard aged dry version can be found that grates well. In the UK, it's "Mexican Cheese."

(In the U.S., "Mexican cheese" may be Jack or may be Queso Acadero or Queso Oaxaca, which is similar to Jack but of a consistency more like mozzarella. Mass marketers have also begun distributing "Mexican Cheese" that's mostly Jack. I think they feel "Mexican" sounds more exotic.)

Monterey is often found marbled with Colby cheese or mixed with bits of hot and mild pepper and called "Pepper Jack." The "Jack" part might come from David Jacks, the major producer in the 19th century. (Like a lot of other foods, there are other stories of it origin and name, but it's not really the kind of cheese worth arguing over.) It is often found on Mexican-American dishes and as an alternative to cheddar on burgers and such.

No doubt, when made as an artisanal cheese, it becomes more flavorful than the plastic-like grocery store brick. And it's undoubtedly rooted in Spain and pretty much a plain, mild cheese that's aged longed in its best form. And with the increasing interest in artisan cheeses, there are now many sources of far more sophisticated Jack cheese that is likely back to the original Spanish quality.

Industrial Grade


Getting Better


Rumiano's Dry Jack
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Old 03-11-2012, 09:07 AM   #20
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I lived in Philly for quite a few years, and people in Philadelphia do NOT put Cheese Whiz on cheesesteaks. Onions on the griddle first, maybe some bell pepper, then shaved beef, often still frozen, on top of 'em. Turn and top with provolone, let melt. Serve on a 6" Italian torpedo roll, top with marinara. Cheese Whiz...aaaagghhhh!
I can't remember the restaurant names, but I saw on a tv show once (either food network or cooking channel) where they featured two places. The point of the show was to see who had the best philly cheesesteak, and they used cheez whiz.
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